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SEPTEMBER *, 2018 I VOLUME 37 I NUMBER 34 I EU6ENEWEEKLY.COM I FREE EVERY THURSDAYI 



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letters! 


UNIVERSITY OF WASTE 

Watching the destruction of the East 
and West grandstands at Hayward Field, I 
can’t help but ask the question: How much 
of that material is good enough to be re¬ 
cycled and utilized? 

For example: How many tiny homes 
could have been built with salvaged mate¬ 
rial from the stands, if it could have been 
carefully dismantled, the salvageable lum¬ 
ber reused and the larger timbers sawn to 
smaller dimensions and utilized? 

Why simply dump it in the landfill, 
when it could be reused? 

Lon Miller 
Drain 

PROTECT THE VULNERABLE 

I was present when former Mayor Kitty 
Piercy and the city of Eugene passed our 
sanctuary resolution. Today I am writing to 
address Measure 105, a new effort to re¬ 
peal the sanctuary laws that have been in 
place in Oregon for 30 years with biparti¬ 
san support. 

The measure would erode our sense of 
security with local law enforcement. 

I was present when the city of Spring- 
field held a hearing to decide the future of 
their contract with ICE. An hour of testi¬ 
monies made clear that the presence of 
ICE in Springfield deteriorated the rela¬ 
tionship between the community and local 
law enforcement. The city and the mayor 
terminated the contract with ICE. 

Measure 105 will not make our com¬ 
munities safer. It will perpetuate racial pro¬ 
filing and undermine the safety of our most 
vulnerable community members. 

Carol Goodman 
Eugene 

NO HARM IN KAVA 

I was annoyed to see that the local kava 
bar was harassed (“Kava Controversy,” 
Aug. 23) and temporarily shut down by 
authorities, only to open after hiring an at¬ 
torney that fought for their case. 

The accusation was that kava is a “food 
additive” and therefore cannot be sold in 
a restaurant. I don’t fully understand what 
“food additive” means in this context; nev¬ 
ertheless, it makes no sense to me at all. 
Kava is a plant, and the root is used to make 
a tea or infusion that is then consumed. 

There are many plants used in similar 
ways that are for sale in restaurants, tea 
houses and coffee shops all over — plants 
that we like for different reasons, many of 
which have scientifically proven health 
benefits and that we enjoy. 

I love a cup of coffee in the morning. 
Coffee is a bean living within a fleshy fruit 
that comes from places far away. We dry it, 
roast it and grind it up to make a yummy 
and medicinal drink that many, although 
not all, like to consume. 

Kava has some effects on mood and 
tends towards producing a euphoric effect. 
In my view, drinking kava is a very safe 
and gentle way to have a good time. 

Elke Overstake 
Cottage Grove 

BOOT KNUTE 

Russian meddling with campaign ads 
in Oregon? Well, maybe misleading and 
twisted ads did a job on Hillary, but Or¬ 


egon is not going to accept it. 

Our view of our female Gov. Kate 
Brown is based on what we have seen her 
do in the short time that she has been our 
governor. Brown is a fine workhorse for 
the public good, and she is not the cause 
of any longstanding problems in our state. 

Republican gubernatorial candidate 
Knute Buehler, on the other hand, is cam¬ 
paigning without a voting record to sup¬ 
port his claims. 

I stand with Planned Parenthood and 
their warning that Buehler cannot be trust¬ 
ed. We are just not that gullible to believe 
in Buehler’s fairytale ads that are scaring 
our children as well as giving them misin¬ 
formation. 

Deb Huntley 
Eugene 

RESTORING THE MILLRACE 

Hooray! It is encouraging to learn that the 
University of Oregon, in building the new 
science campus, will restore at least a section 
of the Eugene Millrace. With that example, 
the remainder of the race should be restored 
to bring back a great asset for our city. 

Prior to the construction of a roadway, 
in about 1949, the Millrace had a steady 
flow of water and was widely used for 
recreation until the city choose to fill the 
lower section of it for the roadway. I joined 
with many University of Oregon students 
and Eugene citizens to object to the de¬ 
struction of the Millrace. 

The best we could negotiate was a com¬ 
promise, but one that was significant. The 
city agreed to place large pipes under the 
fill so that it would continue to have rea¬ 
sonable drainage and agreed to continue to 
pump water from the Willamette River into 
the Millrace so that there would be cold 
water with a satisfactory flow. 

Following the construction of the road¬ 
way, the city kept its promise — but only 
for a few years. The flow of the Millrace 
was slowed, and the pumping of water 
from the river into the Millrace stopped. 
As described in the Register-Guard, the 
result was a stagnant, unpleasant ditch of 
bad of water. 

The restoration could be accomplished 
in conjunction with the work being done 
for the University of Oregon. To restore 
the Millrace would be to return an enor¬ 
mous asset to our city and to keep a prom¬ 
ise that was made long ago. 

Arthur C. Johnson 
Eugene 

Editor’s note: Art Johnson is a co-owner of Eugene Weekly. 

PILEDRIVER 

Regarding the “Nerd Bashing Time” 
cover story on the Springfield ultimate 
figher (EW, Aug. 16): Fake sport, fake 
champ, fluff news, waste of (expensive) 
newsprint. 

Would have made a good one column, 
but not worth cover and feature pages. 
Were the words free? 

Stephen Stanley 
Eugene 

LETTERS POLICY: We welcome letters on all topics and 
will print as many as space allows, with priority given 
to timely local issues. Please limit length to 200 words 
and include your address and phone number for our files. 
Email to letters@eugeneweekly.com, fax to 484-4044 or 
mail to 1251 Lincoln, Eugene 97401. 


September 6, 2018 • eugeneweekly.com 






BY BOB WARREN 


It’s All We Got 

PINNING HOPES ON TRAVEL AND SPORTS 

A July 31 editorial in The Register-Guard highlighted Lane County 
workers’ low wages relative to other Oregon counties. The RG is 
correct and points to our affordable housing crisis as one symptom 
of these low wages, making a good case for why we do economic 
development. 

However, no one should be holding their breath for improvement any time soon. 
The local economic development agency, the Lane Metro Partnership, was dis¬ 
mantled by Lane County in 2014. Since then, there has been no one in charge. And 
the state’s economic development agency, Business Oregon, offers little or no help 
to communities outside of the Portland area. Under the current governor, Oregon 
doesn’t really do economic development anymore and Business Oregon is a shadow 
of its former self. 

Our best hope for job growth in Lane County now rests with Tracktown USA and 
Travel Lane County. 

There was a time when Lane County had an effective and successful economic 
development agency. In those days, the state of Oregon was also actively engaged in 
statewide economic development, putting staff and resources out in the held to help 
create family wage jobs. The state had a core team of business recruitment and re¬ 
gional development professionals linked with Oregon communities. All of this grew 
out of the recession of the 1980s. 

Neil Goldschmidt ran for governor on “The Oregon Comeback,” and, as gover¬ 
nor, he delivered. Goldschmidt created an effective economic development depart¬ 
ment within his office and hired seasoned professionals to run it. They identified 
and focused on “key industries” that included the newly emerging high technology 
sector. Intel was one of the early recruitments, creating thousands of high wage jobs, 
and is still one of the state’s largest private employers. Goldschmidt was governor 
for only four years but he put the state economy on a recovery trajectory that was 
continued and enhanced by Barbara Roberts, John Kitzhaber (before Cylvia Hayes) 
and Ted Kulongoski. 

The Goldschmidt team created economic development regions with designated 
non-government organizations contracted to coordinate economic development in 
their communities. For Lane County, that agency was the Eugene Springfield Metro 
Partnership, later changed to Lane Metro Partnership. 

Big changes in economic development came with the new Kitzhaber, after Hayes. 
The deterioration was almost immediate, taking people out of the held and putting 
them in offices. By the time of Kitkzhaber’s resignation, economic development by 
the state had been relegated to the Regional Silly Teams (see “The Long Con,” EW 
12/13/17). Business Oregon quickly lost focus and, with the elimination of regional 
staff, agency morale and effectiveness plummeted. 

In Lane County, the Metro Partnership had been managed by a string of highly 
qualified economic development professionals that included John Lively, Lee Beyer 
and Jack Roberts. And the results were spectacular. Working closely with the state, 
the Metro Partnership was instrumental in recruitments that included Hyundai, Sony 
Disc Manufacturing, Symantec, Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines, Enterprise Car Rent¬ 
als, Levi Strauss and others. 

Regardless of your opinion about recruiting big companies to locate here, they 
created thousands of good high wage jobs and, I believe, it was the right thing to do at 
the time. Don’t kid yourself: We would welcome any one of those recruitments today. 

Metro also helped hundreds of local businesses to expand and grow and create 
thousands of jobs. Williams/Franz Bakery and Invitrogen, now Life Technologies, 
are just two examples of high-wage jobs that likely would have left Lane County 
were it not for the effectiveness of the Metro Partnership. But, rest easy folks, none of 
those recruitments could happen now. Those days are gone. Neither the state or local 
agencies are capable of anything close to that level of performance today. 

Lively, Beyer and Roberts have gone on to other things and the Metro Partnership 
is no more. Gov. Kate Brown just accepted the Regional Silly Team nonsense and 
called it “economic development.” Under her watch, Business Oregon continued its 
downward slide, eliminating knowledgeable regional held staff and now offers little 
or no assistance outside of the Portland area. There is no ability to actually recruit or 
retain high wage jobs outside of Portland. 

Given all of that, I would place our best hope for the creation of jobs and wage 
growth with the efforts of Travel Lane County and Tracktown USA. Their upcoming 
events in 2020 and 2021 at the new Hayward Field will put our community on the 
national stage, in a positive light. It’s our best economic development strategy by 
default. We show the world what and who we are as a community. They can see us 
as the kind of place where people want to live, and where a businesses would want to 
locate. If we can do that, there is a good chance that some of the track fans who own 
or manage a business will make a lifestyle decision to bring and grow their jobs here. 

I hope so, because in terms of economic development, it’s our best shot for now, 
it’s really all we got. Maybe it’s enough. ■ 


Bob Warren retired in 2012 as the regional business development officer for Business Oregon for Lane, 
Lincoln, Linn and Benton counties. Before that he was a senior policy advisor to Gov. Barbara Roberts and 
district aide and natural resource advisor for Rep. Peter DeFazio. 




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Coming up next at The Shedd... 


9.14-30 THE WIZARD OFOZ 
10.3 David Bromberg Quintet 
10.11-14 Jazz Kings: In The Mood 
Glenn Miller & The Dorseys 
10.17 Chico Schwall Am. Roots: 

Bonaparte’s Retreat 
10.21 Carl Woideck Jazz Heritage: 
Perfectly Frank 


10.22 An evening w/ Pat Metheny 

10.26 Leo Kottke 

10.27 Larry Fuller Trio 

10.28 microphilharmonic: Brahms 
11.13 Rufus Wainwright 

11.15 David Grisman Dawg Trio 

11.16 The Good Time Travelers 
11.30-12.16 WHITE CHRISTMAS 


EUGENEWEEKLY.COM • SEPTEMBER 6, 20 l8 







BY HENRY HOUSTON 

TAKING THE 
PAPER TRAIL 

Sen. Ron Wyden pushes for 
paper ballots In elections 

en. Ron Wyden wants elections to go back to the 
future. 

Wyden, along with other senators including 
Sen. Jeff Merkley, introduced legislation to the 
U.S. Senate that would require state and local 
governments to use paper ballots to ensure elections are 
free from foreign interference, like Russians. 

Wyden was joined at a press conference in Eugene 
Thursday, Aug. 30, by local chapters of the NAACP and 
League of Women’s Voters, to advocate the Protecting 
American Votes and Elections (PAVE) Act of 2018. 

If passed, the bill would require the use of paper ballots 
and “risk-limiting” audits for all federal elections, which 
Wyden says would limit the chances of foreign influence 
in elections. 

Now, Wyden isn’t pushing for ballots like hanging 
chads — which caused election controversy in Florida dur¬ 
ing the 2000 election. 

He and other senators want elections to have a paper 
ballot which, when an audit is necessary, leaves a verifiable 
paper trail. 

Wyden said about 40 million Americans currently use 
“unreliable” voting machines. In addition, 22 states do not 
offer paper ballots to voters. 

The problem with modern elections, Wyden said, is that 
voting machine companies think they’re above the law and 
have found a way to secure their place in elections thanks 
to active lobbying. 

During the press conference, Wyden targeted Election 
Systems & Software (ES&S), a company that he described 
as a leading provider of election services and products. 

In March, the senator questioned ES&S on whether the 


company’s voting machines were installed with remote- 
access software. The company didn’t provide an answer. 

ES&S sent a letter in April 2018 to Wyden, saying their 
voting machines had remote access software installed. As a 
result, the machines could be vulnerable to hacking, which 
has the power to manipulate election results. 

“That’s as bad for American voters as taking our ballots 
and transferring them to the streets of Moscow,” Wyden said. 

However, in an email to Eugene Weekly, the company 
expanded on the answer, saying the remote access software 
was not installed on voting machines but on computers 
used for elections administrative purposes, as was common 
practice for computers in the early 2000s. 

ES&S added that it ended the practice in 2007 and its 
customers do not have the remote access software installed 
in computers today. 

During the press conference, Wyden also took a hard 
stance against Russians as well as “hostile foreign states” 
that he said are able to easily penetrate U.S. democracy. 

“The Russians are essentially like the burglars, who 
stalk around the neighborhood,” Wyden said. “Literally 
going from door to door, looking for opportunities, doors 


left open, places where they can penetrate our democracy.” 

Twelve Russians have been charged with hacking the 
2016 U.S. election. 

Wyden, however, says he doesn’t want his tone to be 
confused with stirring up a Cold War-like narrative with 
Russia. 

“There’s a difference between Russians trying to under¬ 
mine democracy and exploit the fact that our country has a 
president who’s willing to go along with it, and going out and 
starting a new nuclear arms race,” he tells Eugene Weekly. 

So far, Wyden has recruited support from senators Ber- 
nie Sanders and Kamala Harris, and he says he’s going to 
work on getting more allies in Congress. 

As for securing the funds to distribute paper ballots, he 
says that Congress appropriated $380 million for election 
security. This money could provide every registered Amer¬ 
ican voter with paper ballots. 

“Everyone should get a ballot by mail,” Wyden said 
in reference that the U.S. should have an Oregon-style 
election. “Now, I don’t think we can get that in this 
Congress. What we can do is get a paper ballot for every 
American.” ■ 



SLANT 

• Fear is an apt title for 
Bob Woodward’s new book 
about the Trump White House, 

where staffers steal the 
president’s paperworkto keep 
him from starting a world war 
and P0TUS derides his own 
attorney general as “retarded.” 
But the real fright this week 
is the Senate confirmation 
hearing for Brett Kavanaugh, 
Trump’s latest pickto stackthe 
Supreme Court with justices 
opposed to abortion rights. Is 
anyone else afraid? 

• After enjoyingthe first 
two seasons of the Netflix 


series The Crown, we came to 
a stunning realization: What 
the United States craves 
these days is proper royalty. 

In The Crown, Claire Foy as a 
young Queen Elizabeth II learns 
the difference between her 
job as head of state and the 
prime minister’s job as head 
of government. The American 
remake ofthe show would have 
to be called The Clown — for the 
man who holds both offices. 

• To prove that wonderful 
gifts come in all sizes and for 
all life, a man this week told an 
CW employee about adopting 
elderly dogs and givingthem 
the home life they deserve. 

It’s something he has done 
for years. Fie showed off his 


elderly, and shiny, blue heeler, 
adopted at 1st Avenue Shelter 
in Eugene morethan a year 
ago. Sadly, a tumor in the dog’s 
underside burst overthe Labor 
Day weekend, and the dog will 
have to be put down. The man 
said he will be sad, but he will 
adopt another elderly dog and 
give it the gift of a dignified 
life. Please consider adopting 
elderly dogs and cats— the 
frosted faces in our shelters 
need a soft landing. 

• Thought experiment 
as Twitter and Facebook 
representatives went before 
Congress on Sept. 5: What 
is the effect of Twitter on 
Donald Trump’s presidency? 
What would happen if, say, a 


wealthy group of investors 
bought controlling shares 
in Twitter (NYSE: TWTR) and 
then took away Trump’s ability 
to Tweet? Is social media 
so powerful that, without it, 
Trump’s seemingly Teflon-like 
ability to deflect scandal would 
disappear too? Duly noted: CW 
is pro-First Amendment and the 
right to free speech. 

• Take some action on 
climate change this weekend. 

Saturday, Sept. 8 is a global 
day of action on climate change 
and 350 Eugene invites you to 
join in solidarity with people 
from 83 countries. 350 
Eugene is comingtogether with 
“a dozen ally organizations, 
and the climate-concerned 


community at large” to “Rise 
for Climate, Jobs and Justice.” 
There will be a a rally, teach- 
ins, pledge of resistance, 
activities for kids, short march 
and a public demonstration 
from 1 to 3 pm at the Campbell 
Community Center, 155 High 
Street, world.350.org/eugene. 

• This week in Ely’s online 
news coverage: A mural by 
Blek Le Rat accidentally 
painted over, Sen. Ron Wyden’s 
favorite Subway sandwich and 
£W’s football coverage ofthe 
“Bowling Green Massacre.” 


SLANT INCLUDES SHORT OPINION PIECES, OBSERVATIONS AND RUMOR-CHASING NOTES COMPILED BY THE EW EDITORIAL BOARD. HEARD ANY GOOD RUMORS LATELY? CONTACT EDIT0R@iEUGENEWEEKLY.COM 


September 6, 2018 • eugeneweekly.com 





I 


This September is the fourth one in a row where the focus must 
be on the dire straits of our forests. It was 2015 when I first wrote, 
“The worst fire season ever. Ever!” Every year since then has been 
just as bad or worse. Drought stress coupled with a barrage of pests 
and fungal diseases is killing Douglas firs rapidly. Now prominent in 
low elevation forests, tall, dead trees are giant torches waiting for 
ignition. 

September is traditionally 
considered the best month 
for camping in the wild. 

Campfires are prohibited 
in all parts of the National 
Forests, removing one of 
the most enjoyable parts of 
camping. Use small stoves 
only, for cooking. 

It’s time to think seriously 
about gathering equipment 
for rain camping this winter. 

This might prove more chal- 
lengingthan snow camping; 
stayingdry can be harder 
than staying warm. The pros¬ 
pect depends on the rainy 
season arriving soon, before 
the nights get too long. 

We are looking forward to 
the annual surge of migra¬ 
tory bird sightings. Already 
our feeders are swamped 

with flocks of goldfinches and various sparrows. Winter waterfowl 
will start showing up in the ponds and sloughs where our avifauna 
diversity will climb. Arrival of one of my favorites, buffieheads, is 
keenly anticipated. 

Rain or not, mushroom season is here. Chanterelles are already 
up near the coast; porcini in the mountains will wait forthe rains. 

Our vegetable garden (especially the cucumbers) has benefited 
from hot, sunny days thanks to ample daily watering. 



David Wagner is a botanist who works in Eugene. He teaches moss classes, 
leads nature walks and makes nature calendars. He can be contacted through his 
website, fernzenmosses.com. 


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EUGENEWEEKLY.COM • SEPTEMBER 6, 20 l 8 























PHOTO COURTESY MARCUS OBAL / WIKICOMMONS MEDIA 


FIRES WON’T WAIT ANOTHER MONTH 

City code gives property owners up to a month to get in compliance, but fires can come at any time. 


A single spark could light up the dead grass and 
blackberry bushes blanketing the sidewalks 
and alleyways of Eugene’s neighborhoods. 
Even with this summer’s bone-dry weather 
— the U.S. Drought Monitor says Lane County 
is experiencing severe to extreme drought — the city of 
Eugene’s current vegetation code allows property owners 
upwards of a month to dispose of dry debris. 

Although Eugene saw a brief reprieve with some 
late August rain, those small showers didn’t dampen the 
tinderbox that could threaten homes in south Eugene. On 
Emerald Street between 35th and 38th avenues, an area 
of dried trees and blackberry bushes has been waiting for 
a spark, says Charlie Larson, a Eugene resident who has 
lived in the city since 1950. 

“Perhaps we’ve been given a few extra days of grace 
since the weather has been cooler and we’re heading into 
September,” Larson wrote in an email to Eugene Weekly. 
“But Eugene may have to discover painfully it’s more 
vulnerable than Redding if the big trees catch on fire on 
one of those hot days. There won’t be a way to contain it.” 

The possibility of a huge fire caused by a few sparks 
isn’t unheard of. The Carr Fire in California started after 
sparks from a flat tire ignited dry brush on the side of the 
road. It destroyed hundreds of homes in Redding and killed 
eight people. 

In Eugene, Larson noticed the build up of dry debris 
and contacted city officials, including City Manager Jon 


Ruiz and Eugene-Springfield Deputy Fire Marshall Merrill 
Harrison, several times to alert them to the fire hazard. 

Michelle Parkins, Eugene’s code enforcement officer with 
the city’s Urban Forestry Department, says the department 
responds to complaints that residents submit, and that the 
department is not primarily worried about aesthetics. 

“Blackberries are a nuisance, but the tall grass and 
weeds are a fire hazard,” she says. 

Parkins is the city’s sole vegetation code enforcement 
manager, with only one additional seasonal employee from 
May to October. 

When Parkins receives a complaint, she completes an 
inspection and documents a code violation should one 
occur. A notice is sent to the property owner as well as the 
resident living at the property, and they have 10 days to 
comply with city code. 

Parkins says the ultimate goal is for the resident or property 
owner to voluntarily comply with the city code, and that she 
is open to working with residents who may need more time. 

If Parkins does a second inspection and the property is 
not in compliance, an abatement notice giving the owner 
another 10 days is posted on the property and sent through 
the mail. If the order is not completed, the city takes care 
of the work and then bills the owner. 

But for Larson and others, this month-long process 
seems shortsighted when a spark could ignite the powder 
keg of dry debris in a second. He contacted his city 
councilor, Betty Taylor, about the fire hazard. 


“I agree that this is not enough — or soon enough,” 
Taylor wrote in an email to Larson. 

Taylor isn’t only concerned with the current fire hazard 
that dry debris poses — in the past she has tried to ban 
consumer fireworks because of Eugene’s parched summer 
conditions. 

“It’s really dangerous because it’s almost always dry 
here in the summer, and a spark can cause something that 
can sweep through [a neighborhood],” Taylor says. 

For Taylor, the process of notifying owners multiple 
times and giving them more time to comply with the code 
could increase the risk of a fire. 

“If it’s a dangerous thing, I think it should be less time 
than that,” Taylor tells EW, adding that if it’s dangerous it 
should be removed immediately. “I think a week would be 
long enough, but you need to find out if the person is in town.” 

Taylor has brought up the timeliness issue with the 
Eugene City Council several times, but the matter has been 
postponed. The council is not in session until later this 
month, and Taylor says that changing the nuisance code is 
on the city council’s agenda for November. 

“It’s too late to take care of things this summer, but for 
next summer,” Taylor says. 

With the City Council out of session, the possibility for 
a fire grows every day, and for now Eugeneans can only 
hope for cooler skies and raindrops. ■ 

Information about Oregon’s drought conditions can be found on 
drought.gov. 


LANE COUNTY AREA 
SPRAY INFORMATION 

• Weyerhaeuser, 541-744-4600, 
plans to aerially spray 943.1 acres in 
many areas around Dexter Lake with 
clopyralid, glyphosate, imazapyr, 
triclopyr with amine, Induce, MS0 Con¬ 
centrate and/or Dyne-Amic. See 0DF 
notification 2018-771-12051, call Tim 
Meehan at 541-726-3588 with ques¬ 
tions. 

• City of Eugene, 541-682-4874, 
plans to hire Habitat Restoration, 541- 
979-7282, to treat stumps on 131.1 


acres south of the LCC main campus on 
30th Avenue with Garlon 3A, Mineral Oil, 
Alky I phenol polyoxyethylene (contains 
petroleum distillates) and/or Hasten. 
See 0DF notification 2018-781-11888, 
call Brian Peterson at 541-935-2283 
with questions. 

• Christian Futures, 541-999- 
6977, plansto hire Essential Flight 
Operations, 360-526-4659, to aerially 
spray 37.0 acres near South Canary 
Road and 40.5 acres near Herman 
Cape Road with glyphosate, imazapyr, 
sulfometuron methyl 8c metsulfuron 
methyl, triclopyr with ester and/or MS0 


Concentrate. See 0DF notifications 
2018-781-11801 and 2018-781-11994, 
call Quincy Coons at 541-997-8713 
with questions. 

• New Growth c/o FIA, c/o Mason 
Bruce 8c Girard, 541-973-8713, plans 
to hire Nick’s Timber Services, 503- 
876-8220, to spray 516.1 acres near 
the Siuslaw River and Westlake with 
triclopyr with ester, brush 8c basal oil 
and/or MS0 Concentrate. See 0DF no¬ 
tification 2018-781-11992, call Quincy 
Coons at 541-997-8713 with questions. 

• Roseburg Resources, 541-679- 
3311, plans to spray 483.1 acres in 


many areas north and south of the 
Siuslaw River with imazapyr. See 0DF 
notification 2018-781-11994, call Dan 
Menk at 541-935-2283 with questions. 

• Tall Corn Forestry, c/o FIA, c/o 
MBG, 541-973-1951, plans to hire Nick’s 
Timber Services, 503-876-8220, to 
spray 371.3 acres north of Ferguson 
Creek with glyphosate, imazapyr, 
triclopyr, sulfometuron methyl, brush 
8c basal oil and/or LI 700. Call Robin 
Biesecker at 541-935-2283 with ques¬ 
tions. 

Compiled by Gary Hale, Beyond Toxics, beyondtoxics.org 



















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EUGENEWEEKLY.COM • SEPTEMBER 6, 20 l 8 






LEONARD BERNSTEIN 
COMPOSING IN 1945 


PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE LEONARD BERSTEIN OFFICE 


Leonard Bernstein’s contribution to classical music lives on in Eugene by henry Houston 


arin Alsop had just started her job as music 
director and conductor at Eugene Symphony 
when Leonard Bernstein invited her to celebrate 
her birthday with him in New York. 

It was Oct. 14, 1990. She was inside the 
Eugene airport, ready to go visit her mentor, and she still 
remembers the date. Because that’s when she heard that 
Bernstein had died. 

He was 72. 

Aug. 25, 2018, marked 100 years of Bernstein, whose 
work and contribution to the American classical world 
lives on. Bernstein never set foot in Oregon, but his legacy 
of engaging with audiences, inspiring youth and his com¬ 
positions continue in Eugene’s orchestras. 

THE PEOPLE'S MUSICIAN 

Throughout his life, Bernstein worked toward “demys¬ 
tifying” classical music, Alsop tells Eugene Weekly on the 
road from Chicago. 

Alsop, now the music director of Baltimore Symphony 
Orchestra, has been talking with media outlets to both sup¬ 
port Bernstein’s 100th birthday and market a box set of 
Bernstein, titled Bernstein: Marin Alsop’s Complete Naxos 
Recordings. Alsop, a student of Bernstein’s, has become 
one of his biggest advocates. 

Bernstein was born in 1918 to Russian-Jewish immi¬ 
grants. He caught the music bug at 10 and became an over¬ 
night sensation when, at 25, he substituted for an ill Bruno 
Walter, conducting the New York Philharmonic at the last 
minute. He held the music director position until 1969. 

He was the first conductor to break down walls by 
bringing orchestral works to the general public through 
television with his Young People’s Concerts with the New 
York Philharmonic. The series was broadcast on CBS from 
1958 to 1972. Bernstein used the show to introduce the 
works of Gustav Mahler, Aaron Copland, Igor Stravinsky 


and many other composers to young audiences — but its 
target demographic could be anyone interested in music. 

“He had the ability to make it sound so natural and nec¬ 
essary for the average Joe,” says Kelly Kuo, artistic direc¬ 
tor for Oregon Mozart Players. “By taking out the elitism, 
he made it like you were having a conversation with the 
butcher at your deli. As you’re getting a pound of ground 
beef, you’re talking about Copland.” 

The series’ episodes had titles such as “What is Clas¬ 
sical Music,” “What Is a Mode” or “What Is a Melody.” 
These are the kind of questions that can easily result in a 
dense, academic answer. However, with a young audience 
present, Bernstein gave answers that were educational and 
easily accessible. 

Besides conducting and educating, Bernstein’s work 
ethic resulted in a prolific catalogue of compositions. Yet 
it’s the music of West Side Story, which gracefully meshes 
the worlds of jazz and classical, that many know Bernstein 
for. 

Alsop can’t say what her favorite Bernstein piece is, but 
she will say that she loves “Somewhere” from the Broad¬ 
way musical. 

His other works included film scores, choral works, 
chamber music, symphonies and more. 

Bernstein also took on politics and human rights. He 
held a fundraiser for the Black Panthers to raise money for 
the members of “Panther 21” who were in jail. 

To no surprise, Bernstein was a target for the FBI and 
J. Edgar Hoover. In fact, Bernstein was even dragged into 
a House Un-American Activities Committee interrogation. 

The FBI has since declassified several hundred pages 
of reports on Bernstein and his political activity as they 
attempted to pinpoint some sort of “communist” activity 
and ruin his career. 

His passion for global politics took him to Berlin when 
the wall fell in 1989, where he conducted a performance of 
Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, changing “Ode to Joy” into 


“Ode to Freedom.” 

Alsop says Bernstein burned the candle at both ends, 
yet those around him thought he’d live forever. 

EUGENE’S CONNECTION TO BERNSTEIN 

When Alsop was growing up in New York City, she had 
a poster of The Beatles’ iconic Abbey Road walk and one 
of Leonard Bernstein. The poster of Bernstein was larger 
than the Beatles. It wasn’t done on purpose, but it was fore¬ 
telling of the role he would play in her life. 

“He was my hero,” she tells EW. “He knew he was my 
idol. I told him enough times.” 

Alsop avoids the word “crush” when talking about Ber¬ 
nstein, but she says he knew he was an idol for many. 

She remembers seeing one of his Young People’s Con¬ 
certs at 9. She doesn’t remember the music from the event, 
but what still sticks in her memory is how he would jump 
around when he conducted. 

“It made me want to be a conductor that day because no 
one yelled at him for jumping around,” Alsop says. 

That nine-year-old girl would later become music di¬ 
rector and conductor of Eugene Symphony from 1989 to 
1996. 

Today, Alsop has earned some of the highest accolades 
in classical music — certainly the most for any former di¬ 
rector of Eugene Symphony. 

Alsop is currently the music director of Baltimore Sym¬ 
phony Orchestra and principal conductor and music direc¬ 
tor of the Sao Paulo Symphony Orchestra. She’s consid¬ 
ered one of Bernstein’s best-known pupils and is a central 
figure in his 100th birthday celebration. 

Bernstein, she says, had a sort of grace and comfort 
while sharing his thoughts about music. 

“I loved the communication,” she says about his Young 
People’s Concerts. “I felt that he was talking to me.” 

At Eugene Symphony, which was her first job as a 



September 6, 2018 • eugeneweekly.com 









BRAVO! 2018 


MARIN ALSOP AND 
LEONARD BERNSTEIN AT 



PHOTO COURTESY MARIN ALSOP 


music director after studying with Bernstein, Alsop says 
she started experimenting talking with audiences, and it 
seemed to have a positive impact. 

When Alsop first studied with Bernstein, after earn¬ 
ing the Leonard Bernstein Conducting Fellowship to the 
Tanglewood Music Center, she says it was terrifying and 
wonderful to work with him. 

“I was afraid that he wouldn’t live up to my expecta¬ 
tions,” she says. “He not only met all of my expectations. 
He exceeded them. He was one of those rare people that 
gave so much more in person than you could ever imag¬ 
ine.” 

Alsop, then 31, worked with Bernstein in what she re¬ 
members as an exciting summer of 1988. 


“I was old enough to understand it. I didn’t miss any of 
it,” she says. “I can remember almost every conversation 
with him, verbatim.” 

The day after she conducted a concert with Bernstein, 
he celebrated his 70th birthday. Alsop attended the birthday 
celebration, which was a gathering of some of America’s 
greatest composers, lyricists and musicians. 

It was a festive celebration, Alsop recalls. Among oth¬ 
er dedications to him, West Side Story’s lyricist, Stephen 
Sondheim, reworked lyrics in Bernstein’s honor, which 
Lauren Bacall then sang. And John Williams — the giant 
of movie music — wrote a sort of fanfare for Bernstein. 

In June, Williams was a guest conductor for Baltimore 
Symphony Orchestra. Aware of how much Bernstein 
meant to Alsop, Williams invited her to take the podium 
and conduct “To Lenny! To Lenny!,” the piece he wrote for 
Bernstein’s 70th birthday. 

A year after working with Bernstein in 1988, Alsop 
would go on to serve as Eugene Symphony’s music direc¬ 
tor and conductor until 1996. 

At Eugene Symphony, she was a champion for Bern¬ 
stein, Kuo says. 

Kuo remembers attending Eugene Symphony’s perfor¬ 
mance of Bernstein’s Mass, which would be Alsop’s final 
time at the podium as music director. Commissioned by 
Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, the composition is an ambi¬ 
tious project that presents the diversity of American music: 
rock 'n’ roll, Broadway and opera. 

Then a student at the University of Oregon, Kuo re¬ 
calls how the performance threw in basically everything 
— even the kitchen sink. The piece is known for being an 
interdisciplinary collaboration, and it took a lot of courage 
for Alsop to bring it to the stage in Eugene, Kuo says. 

HOOKED ON CLASSICAL 

Anniversaries can be problematic for Francesco Lecce- 
Chong, the newest music director and conductor of Eugene 


Symphony. Sometimes anniversaries are an excuse to dedi¬ 
cate performances to a composer whose work is already 
played a lot. Or work that maybe wasn’t meant to pass the 
test of time. 

Bernstein’s work is neither. 

“Leonard Bernstein is more than just a composer,” Lec- 
ce-Chong says. “He’s done more for the music world than 
any other figure in history, especially with how we listen to 
music in the U.S.” 

Although Bernstein could hold his own in an academic 
setting, he was dedicated to breaking down the pretense 
often surrounding classical music with his family-oriented 
concerts. 

Family concerts are a mainstay for many orchestras, 
especially for Eugene Symphony. However, many music 
directors don’t prioritize these concerts, often delegating 
them to assistant directors. 

Family concerts are important for Lecce-Chong. 
They’re a way for Eugene Symphony to have a direct, 
close relationship with the community. 

Lecce-Chong also serves as the music director of the 
Santa Rosa Symphony in Santa Rosa, California. Despite 
the distance, he says the family concerts are an important 
aspect of the job. 

Despite Bernstein’s emphasis on education, the classi¬ 
cal music world is a far cry from where it was when Bern¬ 
stein was alive, says Kuo. 

It’s important to include more youth in music and Ber¬ 
nstein was aware of this, especially since classical music 
— just like today — had a predominately older audience. 
Bernstein was a champion for engaging youth with classi¬ 
cal music, and it’s something Kuo says has worked with 
the Mozart Players. 

During his tenure as music director, he’s implement¬ 
ed programs, like the Young Soloist Competition, to get 
young people hooked on classical music. 

This is also the first year that the Oregon Mozart Play¬ 
ers have committed to conducting community outreach 


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Comedy by Noel Coward • Jan. 25-Feb. 9 

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Classic Musical Comedy • March 29-April 13 

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EUGENEWEEKLY.COM • SEPTEMBER 6, 20 l 8 









BRAVO! 2018 


LEONARD 

BERNSTEIN 



PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE LEONARD BERSTEIN OFFICE 


through Eugene-Springfield Youth Orchestras Mentorship 
and Collaboration. 

The point of the program is to bring a wider community 
into Oregon Mozart Players’ concerts. By doing so, Kuo 
hopes it’ll ingrain classical music into young musicians, 
and especially inspire some to become the next genera¬ 
tion’s leaders in the held. 

“It’ll do what Young People’s Concerts did for me,” he 
says. 

CELEBRATING BERNSTEIN IN EUGENE 

The Bernstein centennial is an opportunity to dig out 
some of the maestro’s work that hasn’t been performed by 
Eugene Symphony, Lecce-Chong says. 

He thought about cramming the Bernstein celebration 
into one program, but he didn’t want people to hear just 
Bernstein. 

Lecce-Chong is proud of the symphony’s three-month 


Bernstein celebration. It has more than just music by Ber¬ 
nstein. It shows his connection to his Jewish heritage with 
Ernest Bloch’s Schelomo. It shows his dedication to human 
rights by performing Dmitri Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 5 
in D Minor, a composer who suffered as an artist under the 
Joseph Stalin. And it’s a display of Bernstein’s ingenuity with 
his Symphony No. 2 (also known as Age of Anxiety). 

Best of all, the season pairs the Fancy Free ballet com¬ 
position with Mozart’s Six German Dances. That will be 
the first time Eugene Symphony has performed the Bern¬ 
stein composition. 

When Lecce-Chong talks about Mozart’s piece, he 
lights up with enthusiasm — although, to be fair, he seems 
to always be that way. It helps that playing harpsichord 
is one of Lecce-Chong’s favorite things to do, but it’s the 
combination of the compositions that excites him. 

He calls the Mozart dances goofy, yet rustic. And they 
were banned during Mozart’s time. 

“You can see people at that time doing scandalous 
dances during this music,” he says. “Like they’re probably 
touching when they shouldn’t be touching.” 

Bernstein, like Mozart, captures a similar image in 
Fancy Free. At 25, Bernstein composed the music for Je¬ 
rome Robbins, who’d later choreographed West Side Story. 
Years later, Fancy Free would become On The Town. 

The score captures the sort of music you would’ve 
heard if you were a sailor out on liberty in World War II- 
era New York City, Lecce-Chong says. 

Oregon Mozart Players have one program of Bernstein, 
titled “Made In America” that features his Arias and Bar¬ 
carolles. 

Bernstein dedicated Arias and Barcarolles to President 
Dwight D. Eisenhower based on feedback from the presi¬ 
dent after a White House performance. 

“I liked that last piece you played. It’s got a theme. 
I like music with a theme, not all them arias and barca¬ 
rolles,” Eisenhower told Bernstein. 

The program also includes Copland’s Lincoln Portrait, 


with whom Bernstein had a close relationship, and Finding 
Rothko by Adam Schoenberg, which channels Bernstein’s 
passion for interdisciplinary arts. 

During the Schoenberg performance, Ella Hansen, a 
student of John Park, a professor at University of Oregon, 
will project her art inspired by Rothko. 

A 21ST-CENTURY MAN 

Conductors today haven’t exactly caught on to jump¬ 
ing on stage as wildly as Bernstein did. Even Alsop says 
that, although his podium antics drew her to conducting, 
she doesn’t conduct like Bernstein. 

However, Bernstein set a precedent for how a conduc¬ 
tor works with an orchestra and its audience. Kuo says the 
modern-day conductor has to follow some of Bernstein’s 
practices. You have to engage with younger audiences, as 
well as provide pre-concert lectures about a performance. 

Bernstein wasn’t just a conductor-composer to Alsop, 
though. He was a great storyteller who could switch from 
reciting great classical literature to making up a limerick 
on the spot. He was a humanitarian. He wasn’t afraid to 
speak out about injustices. 

Although Bernstein’s impact has been made within the 
orchestral world, Alsop may be right that the world needs 
someone who is unafraid to stand up for human rights and 
world issues as proudly as he did. Bernstein might be a fig¬ 
ure the U.S. could gain some wisdom from, as orchestras 
in Eugene — and nationwide — undergo their celebration 
of him. 

For Bernstein’s 70th birthday, he wrote a poem for The 
New York Times. Bernstein criticized American voters for 
electing politicians (President George H.W. Bush) who 
would rather gut social and culture budgets for military 
gain. 

All you have to do is swap Cold War with “War on Ter¬ 
rorism” and his criticism could be viewed as current com¬ 
mentary. ■ 


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September 6, 2018 • eugeneweekly.com 






I once referred to local theater maven Tony Rust as the 
hardest-working man in local show biz, but I believe 
there’s a more apt description, borrowed from baseball 
parlance: Rust is the ultimate utility player, able to bll 
a variety of positions, and to bll them rather well. In 
utility players, talent and endurance and bexibility bnd an 
invaluable harmony, and Cottage Theatre is lucky to have 
Rust on its team. 

For instance, it would seem of late that there isn’t a 
production at Cottage Theatre upon which Rust hasn’t left 
something of an imprint — as director, as set designer, as 
a board member, as a builder and painter, and even, occa¬ 
sionally, as an actor strutting and fretting his hour on stage, 
only to move on immediately to the next project. 

“Partially, it’s just my makeup as a human being,” Rust 
says when I ask him about his ceaseless work in local the¬ 
ater, which includes teaching in the Fine Arts Department 
at Marist High School. “I’m not a happy person if I’m 
not busy, if I’m not doing things. I interweave my theater 
worlds. I balance my work.” 

In appearance — on stage, and even more in person — 
Rust personibes the image of the frenetic entertainer, his 
bngers in several pots at once. He has an air of vaudeville 
about him, lanky and charismatic and sepia-tinted, though 
he also carries a distinct vibe of the freewheeling ’70s: 
mustachioed, a bit loose-limbed and shaggy, but whip- 
smart and alert to his surroundings, and at home with ram¬ 
bling like a rolling stone. Rust wouldn’t have been out of 
place in a Sydney Lumet bick — say Serpico, or Dog Day 


Afternoon. 

Part of this cosmopolitan impression derives from 
Rust’s peripatetic background, including a long stint on the 
East Coast. Born and raised in Wyoming, he studied vocal 
and theater arts at the University of Oregon in the mid ’70s 
before taking part in a 1979 production of Godspell that 
toured Eugene parks. After a brief period in Texas, Rust 
took the big leap, moving to New York, where he served 
as artistic director of a small Shakespeare company before 
he and his wife ran a scene shop for Broadway and off- 
Broadway productions. 

Rust and his wife moved back to Oregon from the Big 
Apple some 13 or 14 years ago, relocating to Cottage 
Grove, where Janet Rust had gone to high school. “We got 
involved with Cottage Theatre pretty much after we got 
back here,” Tony Rust says, adding that his wife acted in 
the brst production they were both involved in. “That kind 
of pulled us in,” he says. “Eventually it became the place 
we hang out most of the time.” 

Hanging out is one thing, but doing it as a volunteer 
who is willing to do everything from hitting the boards to 
painting them is another altogether. Susan Goes, executive 
director of Cottage Theatre, says Rust is an example the 
kind of volunteer that community theaters “wish we could 
clone.” 

“He readily shares his wealth of design and directing 
experience and is deeply committed to producing work of 
the highest standard on our stage,” Goes says. “Tony is a 
clear leader within our community of production volun¬ 


teers, and he inspires and mentors less-experienced theater 
artists.” 

Community theaters, when running on all cylinders, 
can present audiences with “the best part of theaters,” Rust 
says. “Everybody that’s involved wants to do it and is in 
love with it.” 

Because venues like Cottage Theatre run largely on 
volunteer hours, he says, the trick is bnding balance — 
between working hard and having fun, as well as between 
entertaining audiences and pushing the envelope. 

“We do push the envelope,” Rust says, both in terms 
of the material presented and the scope of the theater’s 
enterprise and its ability to mount bigger, more complex 
shows. “Our dream is that one day it would be on the level 
of what Ashland’s Shakespeare Festival grew into, that we 
would grow into providing stipends and salaries for more 
people, and that more college kids could afford to make 
the rehearsals.” 

Right now, Rust is throwing a good portion of his ap¬ 
parently boundless energy into Act Three, a huge renova¬ 
tion of Cottage Theatre with a price tag of more than $1 
million; the upgrades will include more seating, refurbish¬ 
ing the lobby, bxing the proscenium and, in general, “just 
breathing it out a little bit more,” he says. The renovations 
are set to begin after next year’s spring show. 

“The center of our existence this year is Act III,” Rust 
says. “It’s a huge, huge project. It’s going to have a huge 
impact on our lives. It’s just a great, warm, welcoming 
space to work in, both onstage and off, and we’re going to 
make it better.” 

And, never one to stop short of exhaustion, Rust is try¬ 
ing to reinvigorate another pet project. A few years back, a 
cancer scare caused him to cancel a production of Bloody, 
Bloody Andrew Jackson, an edgy emo-rock musical. “The 
cancer was hard, but having to tell everybody no...” he 
trails off, acknowledging that the experience still brings 
tears to his eyes. 

This past presidential election — “Politics are pretty 
hairy right now,” he understates — convinced him to try 
again, and hence his side project Fab Performances was 
born. The troupe of musicians remounted the canceled 
Andrew Jackson musical, and then Rust envisioned the 
company going on to recreate classic albums by legendary 
bands like The Doors and The Rolling Stones, with Rust 
often taking lead vocals. 

“The goal is to have this ongoing company that every 
month or two is doing a new album,” he says. “It’s kind 
of rock and roll on a theatrical template.” It was recently 
announced that Fab Performances will perform John Len¬ 
non’s solo album Imagine. 

The show will be a fundraiser for Act III. And that’s 
Tony Rust through and through — killing two birds with 
one stone. ■ 

Fab (Favorite Album Band) Performances does the Rolling Stones’ Let It Bleed, 
Friday, Sept. 14 at the Bob Deveraux Theatre at 1900 Kingsley Road. $15 gen¬ 
eral admission, $10 student/senior, fabperformances.org. 



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EUGENEWEEKLY.COM • SEPTEMBER 6, 20 l 8 





























BRAVO! PERFORMING ARTS CALENDAR 2018-2019 



PHOTO COURTESY OF HANNIBALBURESS.COM 


HANNIBAL BURESS AT MCDONALD THEATRE SEPT. 30 


COMEDY 
&SPOKEN 
WORD 

Hult Center 

hultcenter.org • 541-682-5000 
DEC. 7 Horry Potter & The Socred 
Text 

The Majestic Theatre, Corvallis 

majestic.org • 541-758-7827 
SEPT. 22 Improv Smackdown 
OCT. 20 No Offense: The Improv 
Jam 

NOV. 11 Stories from Service 
DEC. 22 No Class: Improv Show 

McDonald Theatre 

mcdonaldtheatre.com • 541-345- 
4442 

SEPT. 14 W. Kamau Bell 


SEPT. 19 Craig Ferguson 
SEPT. 30 Hannibal Buress 
OCT. 4 Tom Segura 
OCT. 22 Henry Rollins: Travel 
Slideshow Tour 


DANCE 

All That Dance Company 

allthatdancecompany.com • 541- 
688-1523 

OCT. 5 Booked for the Evening 
(Valley River Inn) 

OCT. 20 NEHS Showcase (North 
Eugene High School) 

Ballet Fantastique 

balletfantastique.org • 541-342- 
4611 

Performances at the Hult Center 
OCT. 19-21 As You Like It: A Wild 
West Ballet 

DEC. 14-16 Babes in Toylond 


Eugene Ballet Company 

eugeneballet.org • 541-485-3992 
Performances at the Hult Center 
OCT. 6-7 Homlet 
DEC. 21-23 The Nutcracker 
FEB. 9-10 Romeo & Juliet 

Hult Center 

hultcenter.org • 541-682-5000 
OCT. 6-7 Eugene Ballet: Homlet 
OCT. 9 The New Chinese 
Actrobats 

OCT. 19-21 Ballet Fantastique: As 
You Like It-A Wild West Ballet 
OCT. 26 Complexions 
Contemporary Ballet: Star Dust 
DEC. 8 So You Think You Con 
Donee Live! 

DEC. 14-16 Ballet Fantastique: 

Babes in Toylond 

DEC. 21-23 Eugene Ballet: The 

Nutcracker 

FEB. 9-10 Eugene Ballet: Romeo & 
Juliet 

Lane Community College Dance 
Department 

lanecc.edu • 541-463-5161 
All performances Ragozzino Hall 
march 7-9 Collaborations Dance 

The Majestic Theatre, Corvallis 

majestic.org • 541-758-7827 
DEC. 1 Winter Dance Concert: 
Making Spirits Bright 

UO Dance Department 

dance.uoregon.edu • 541-346- 
3386 

NOV. 28 Fall Dance Quaterly 
NOV. 29 Fall Dance Open Showing 
NOV. 30 Fall Dance Loft 
FEB. 26 BE Cultura 
march 8 Interplay 


MUSIC 

Chamber Music Amici 

chambermusicamici.org • 541- 
953-9204 

OCT. 15 Anton Arensky String 
Quartet (Wildish) 

NOV. 19 Mastery (Wildish) 

feb. 11 Operatic Geniuses (Wildish) 

Corvallis/OSU Symphony 
Orchestra 

cosusymphony.org • 541-752- 
2361 

OCT. 28 Portland Youth 

Philharmonic 

NOV. 18 Bernstein 101 

NOV. 30 Holiday Concert 

feb. 24 Stars of the Orchestra 

may 20 / Hove Lost Touch with the 

World 

Delgani String Quartet 

delgani.org • 541-579-5882 
Performances at United Lutheran 
Church unless otherwise noted 
OCT. 28-30 Bold Impressions 
JAN. 13-15 Musical Icons (Temple 
Beth Israel) 

march 10-12 Memories of Prague 
may 12-14 Mozart’s Clarinet 
(Temple Beth Israel,) 

Eugene Concert Choir 

eugeneconcertchoir.org • 541- 
687-6865 

Performances at the Hult Center 
DEC. 16 A Dickens of o Christmas 


feb. 24 Foure Requiem 

Eugene Opera 

eugeneopera.com • 541-682- 
5000 

Performances at the Hult Center 
DEC. 30-31 Gilbert & Sullivan’s 
H.M.S. Pinafore 

Eugene Symphony 

eugenesymphony.org • 541-682- 
500 

Performances at the Hult Center 
SEPT. 27 Opening Night! 

OCT. 18 Bernstein & Beethoven 
NOV. 15 Birds of o Feather 
DEC. 1 Star Wars (Episode IV: A 
New Hope) 

DEC. 6 The Red Violin 
JAN. 24 Tchaikovsky Piano 
Concerto 

feb. 14 Rhapsody in Blue 

Hult Center 

hultcenter.org • 541-682-5000 

SEPT. 7 Cash & King: The Ultimate 

Celebration of Legends 

SEPT. 19 John Prine: The Tree of 

Forgiveness Tour 

SEPT. 24 Death Cab for Cutie 

SEPT. 27 Eugene Symphony: 

Opening Night! 

sept. 28 Gabriel Royal 

OCT. 18 Eugene Symphony: 

Bernstein & Beethoven 

OCT. 19 Danny Gokey: Hope 

Encounter Tour 

OCT. 25 Gina Chavez 

NOV. 9 Kip Moore: After the 

Sunburn Tour 

NOV. 15 Eugene Symphony: Birds 
of a Feather 

NOV. 17 Estas Tonne: The Breath 

of Sound World Tour 

NOV. 18 Black Violin 

DEC. 1 Eugene Symphony: Star 

Wars 

DEC. 6 Eugene Symphony: The 
Red Violin 

DEC. 10 Trey Anastasio 

DEC. 10 Eugene Opera: Maria de 

Buenos Aires 

DEC. 16 Eugene Concert Choir: A 


Dickens of a Christmas 
dec. 30-31 Eugene Opera: Gilbert 
& Sullivan’s H.M.S. Pinafore 
JAN. 24 Eugene Symphony: 
Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto 
feb. 14 Eugene Symphony: 
Rhapsody in Blue 
feb. 24 Eugene Concert Choir: 
Faure Requiem 

Lane Community College 

lanecc.edu • 541-463-5202 

Performances at Ragozzino 

Performance Hall 

NOV. 20 Lane Symphonic Band 

and Lane Jazz Ensemble 

NOV. 29 Lane Choirs 

nov. 30 Student Showcase 

DEC. 3 Lane Jazz Combos (Blue 

Door Theatre) 

jan. 23 Student Recital 

Scholarship 

JAN. 25-26 Oregon Jazz Festival 
march 13 Lane Choirs 
march 14 Lane Symphonic Band 
march 15 Student Showcase 
march 15 Lane Jazz Ensemble 
march 18 Jazz Combos (Blue 
Door Theatre) 

LaSells Stewart Center, 

Corvallis 

oregonstate.edu/lasells/events • 
541-737-2402 

SEPT. 23 A Celebration of Leonard 
Bernstein & more 
SEPT. 30 Newport Symphony 
Orchestra: Ode to Joy! 

OCT. 12 Emerald City Jazz Kings 
OCT. 14 Branford Marsalis Quartet 
OCT. 28 Portland Youth 
Philharmonic 

NOV. 4 Corvallis-OSU Piano 

International 

nov. 14 Childsplay 

DEC. 9 Corvallis Youth Symphony 

DEC. 11 Emerald City Jazz Kings 

JAN. 19 An Evening with Angelique 

Kidjo 

feb. 8 Flamenco Vivo Carlota 
Santana 

APRIL 14 Corvallis-OSU Piano 
International 


The Majestic Theatre, Corvallis 

majestic.org • 541-758-7827 
SEPT. 7 Shook Twins w/Clara 
Baker 

DEC. 15 The Majestic Holiday 
Spectacular 

Newport Symphony Orchestra 

newportsymphony.org • 
541-574-0614 
Performances at Newport 
Performing Arts Center 
SEPT. 30 Ode to Joy! (LaSells 
Stewart Center, Corvallis) 
nov. 3-4 Bella Italia 
DEC. 8-9 Amahl & the Night 
Visitors 

march 23-24 Spring Bursts Forth 
may 18 Fairy Tale Finish 

Oregon Mozart Players 

oregonmozartplayers.org • 541- 
345-6648 

Performances at Beall Hall 
OCT. 6 Times Change 
NOV. 10 Made in America 
dec. 8 Candlelight Concert 
feb. 9 Shall We Dance? 
march 9 London Bridges 

Oregon State University 

liberalarts.oregonstate.edu • 541- 
737-0561 

Performances at various locations 
SEPT. 23 A Celebration of Leonard 
Bernstein 

OCT. 24 OSU Wind Ensemble 
OCT. 28 Portland Youth 
Philharmonic 

oct. 29 Festival of Voices Gala 
Concert 

NOV. 4 Steinway Series: Lukas 
Vondracek 

NOV. 8 OSU Choirs Fall Sing! 

NOV. 17 Vienna Boys Choir 
NOV. 18 Corvallis-OSU Symphony 
NOV. 20 OSU Jazz Ensemble 
NOV. 26 Diffusions (4) 

NOV. 27 OSU Wind Symphony 
NOV. 28 OSU Guitar Ensemble 
NOV. 30 OSU University Chorale 
NOV. 30 OSU Campus Band 




BRANFORD MARSALIS QUARTET 
Sun, Oct. 14, 2018 | 7:30pm 


CHILDSPLAY 

Wed, Nov. 14, 2018 | 7:30pm 


ANGELIQUE KIDJO 

□r. Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration Special Event 

Sat, Jan. 19, 2019 | 7:30pm 



THE OREGON SYMPHONY 
Fri, Jan. 25, 2019 | 8pm 


FLAMENCO VIVO CARLOTA SANTANA 
Fri, Feb. 8, 2019 | 7:30pm 



TURTLE ISLAND QUARTET with 
PIANIST CYRUS CHESTNUT 
Sat, March 9, 2019 | 7:30pm 


JENNY SCHEINMAN & H. LEE WATERS 
KANNAPOLIS: A MOVING PORTRAIT 
Sat, April 6, 2019 | 7:30pm 


SEASON AND MINI-PLAN DISCOUNTS 
AVAILABLE THROUGH OCT. 14. 


FOR TICKETS AND INFORMATION GO TO: 

liberalarts.oregonstate.edu/SACpresents 

Mini |ji|) Oregon State 

for aii University 




September 6, 2018 • eugeneweekly.com 





















BRAVO! PERFORMING ARTS CALENDAR 2018-2019 


SEPTEMBER 7-13 



PHOTO BY PAUL CARTER 


NOV. 30 Corvallis-OSU Symphony 
DEC. 2 OSU Wind Ensemble 
JAN. 13 Steinway Series: Jeremy 
Denk 

JAN. 29 OSU Wind Ensemble 

FEB. 24 Corvallis-OSU Symphony 

FEB. 26 OSU Campus Band & 

Chamber Winds 

FEB. 28 OSU Jazz Ensemble 

march 1 Alpin Hung 

march 2 People & Pianos 

The Shedd Institute 

theshedd.org • 

541-434-7000 

Performances at the Jaqua 

Concert Hall at The Shedd 

OCT. 3 David Bromberg Quintet 

oct. n-14 In the Mood 

OCT. 22 Pat Metheny 

OCT. 27 Larry Fuller Trio 

NOV. 13 Rufus Wainwright 

NOV. 15 The Dawg Trio 

NOV. 16 The Good Time Travelers 

DEC. 6-12 Ring Those Bells 

FEB. 7-10 Tonight You Belong to 

Me 

FEB. 13 Ehud Asherie 

FEB. 25 Natalie MacMaster & 

Donnell Leahy 

MARCH 6 Ladysmith Black 

Mambazo 

march 9 Mariachi Sol de Mexico 
march 16 Ruthie Foster 

UO Music 

music.uoregon.edu/events • 541- 

346-5678 

SEPT. 30 Eroica Trio 

OCT. 1 CM@B: Master Class 

OCT. 3 Idit Shner (Tykeson) 

OCT. 5 OJE at Jazz Station 
OCT. 7 World Music Series 
OCT. 19 UO Jazz Party 
OCT. 20 All Day String Day 
OCT. 21 Dali Quartet w/Olga Kern 
OCT. 21 String Day (Tykeson) 

OCT. 22 Liszt Birthday Concert 
OCT. 25 Orchestra Concert 
OCT. 26 OWE/Symphonic Band 
Concert 

OCT. 27 Festival of Bands 

OCT. 27 Michael Fleming 

OCT. 28 Spooktastic in 190 

oct. 28 Pacific Arts Collective 

oct. 30 Octubafest! 

nov. 2 Abbigail Kent, solo harp 

(Tykeson) 

NOV. 3 String Day, all day 
nov. 3 Nicholas Sharma Recital 
(Tykeson) 

NOV. 4 Alan Wood, trombone 
(Tykeson) 

NOV. 4 Oregon Composers Forum: 
Esteli Gozez 

NOV. 5 Tao Li Recital (Tykeson) 
NOV. 7 OJE at North Medford Jazz 
Festival 

nov. 8 Flute Studio Recital 
(Tykeson) 

NOV. 9 UO Jazz Party at Jazz 
Station 

NOV. 13 OWE Concert 
NOV. 14 Campus Band Concert 
NOV. 14 Clarinet Studio (Tykeson) 
NOV. 16 Jazz Fall Concert (Beall) 
NOV. 16-17 THistoire du Soldot 
NOV. 17 CMI Suzuki Fall 
Performance 

nov. 17 Master Class: Akropolis 
Reed Quintet 

NOV. 18 Akropolis Reed Quintet 
NOV. 19 Chamber Music on 
Campus 

nov. 20 Orchestra Concert 

NOV. 26 Trombone Choir 

nov. 27 Campus Orchestra & Rep 


Singers 

NOV. 27 Chamber Music on 
Campus 

NOV. 28 Symphonic Band 
nov. 29 Collegium Concert in 
Collier 

NOV. 29 UO Jazz Combos 
NOV. 30 JazzArts and Honors 
Combos 
DEC. 1 Choir 

DEC. 2 Horns for the Holidays 

DEC. 2 Gospel 

DEC. 7 Chamber Players 

DEC. 8 Suzuki Winter Performance 

DEC. 9 CMI Solo Recitals 

Wildish Theater 

wildishtheater.com • 541-868- 
0689 

OCT. 15 Chamber Music Amici 
NOV. 19 Chamber Music Amici 
FEB. 11 Chamber Music Amici 
APRIL 15 Chamber Music Amici 


THEATER 

Actors Cabaret of Eugene 

actorscabaret.org • 541-683-4368 

SEPT. 14-OCT. 13 Assassins 
NOV. 23-DEC. 22 Wizard of Oz 

Cottage Theatre, Cottage Grove 

cottagetheatre.org • 541-942-8001 
OCT. 5-28 Shrek: The Musical 
NOV. 30-DEC. 16 The Fantasticks 
dec. 29 Fab Performances: 
Imagine (fundraiser) 

FEB. 1-15 Romeo & Juliet 
APRIL 5-27 The Sound of Music 

Hult Center 

hultcenter.org • 541-682-5000 

SEPT. 21-23 Radio Redux: Arsenic 

and Old Lace 

SEPT. 28 Wild Kratts LIVE! 

oct. 27 The Naked Magicians 

OCT. 28 World Famous Popovich 

Comedy Pet Theatre 

NOV. 2-3 Finding Neverland 

NOV. 9-11 Radio Redux: The Day 

the Earth Stood Still 

DEC. 21-23 Radio Redux: A 

Cowboy Christmas 

JAN. 9-20 The Lion King 

FEB. 8-10 Radio Redux: 

Casablanca 
FEB. 16-17 Evita 

Lane Community College 

lanecc.edu • 541-463-5761 
Performances at the Blue Door 
Theatre 

NOV. 8-18 Turkey Shorts 
NOV. 27 Acting Showcase 
feb. 14-17 The Oresteia Project 
march 12 Acting Showcase 

APRIL 25-MAY 5 Millicent 
Scowlworthy 

The Majestic Theatre, Corvallis 

majestic.org • 541-758-7827 
SEPT. 8 Teatro Milagro: iCorre, 
Corre! 

SEPT. 29-30 The Odd Couple 
(Female Version) 

SEPT. 29-OCT. 7 An Ideal Husband 
OCT. 19 Belly Full of Bob 
oct. 27-28 Majestic Reader’s 
Theatre: Foxfire 
NOV. 2-17 Catch Me If You Can 
nov. 25 Majestic Reader’s 
Theatre: Ada and the Engine 
dec. 29 Majestic Reader’s Theatre: 
Fireflies 


McDonald Theatre 

mcdonaldtheatre.com • 541-345- 
4442 

SEPT. 29 Magic Men Live! 

NOV. 9 Suicide Girls 

Oregon Contemporary Theatre 

octheatre.org • 541-465-1506 

SEPT. 21-OCT. 13 Fun Home 
OCT. 26-NOV. 11 At Home at the 
Zoo 

NOV. 30-DEC. 16 Miss Bennet: 
Christmas at Pemberley 
JAN. 18-feb. 3 The Understudy 

MARCH 29-april 14 Damascus 
MAY 17-june 2 Good People 

Oregon Shakespeare Festival, 
Ashland 

osfashland.org • 541-482-4331 

THROUGH OCT. 28 Othello 
THROUGH OCT. 28 Sense and 
Sensibility 

THROUGH OCT. 27 Henry V 
THROUGH OCT. 27 Manhatta 
THROUGH OCT. 27 Rodgers and 
Hammerstein’s Oklahoma! 
THROUGH OCT. 12 Romeo and 
Juliet 

THROUGH OCT. 13 The Book of 
Will 

THROUGH OCT. 14 Love’s Labor’s 
Lost 

THROUGH OCT. 28 The Way the 
Mountain Moved 
THROUGH OCT. 27 Snow in 
Midsummer 

Radio Redux 

radioreduxusa.com 
Performances in Hult Center 
SEPT. 21-23 Arsenic and Old Lace 
NOV. 9-11 The Day the Earth 
Stood Still 

DEC. 21-23 A Cowboy Christmas 
feb. 8-10 Casablanca 
APRIL 12-14 Burns & Allen and 
Friends 

The Shedd Institute 

theshedd.org • 

541-434-7000 
Performances at the Jaqua 
Concert Hall at The Shedd 
SEPT. 14-30 The Wizard of Oz 
NOV. 30-DEC. 12 White Christmas 

University Theatre 

uoregon.edu/theatre • 
541-346-4363 

Performances in the UO’s Miller 

Theatre Complex 

NOV. 2-17 Avenue Q 

JAN. 25-feb. 9 Machinal 

APRIL 19-27 New Voices Writing 

Competition 

MAY 24-JUNE 8 Home Planet 

Upstart Crow Studios 

upstartcrowstudios.org • 

541-688-8260 

OCT. 19 Broadway or Bust! 

(Willamalane) 

Very Little Theatre 

thevlt.com • 541-344-7751 
oct. 26-nov. io Dracula 
NOV. 30-DEC. 16 The Long 
Christmas Dinner 
JAN. 25-FEB. 9 Blithe Spirit 
MARCH 29-APRIL 13 Hello, Dolly! 
APRIL 26-MAY 5 Proof 
JUNE 7-22 The Game’s Afoot 
AUG. 9-24 Harvey 



OREGON 

CONTE MPORARY 

THEATRE 


TONY AWARD-WINNING 
HIT BROADWAY MUSICAL 



SEPTEMBER 21 
OCTOBER 13 


A/bee i j 

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Albee pairs his seminal short play 
7ifie Zoo Story with a prequel, 
Homelife, to complete this 
early masterwork. 

OcrfOBEKjlF - 
NoVEMBERJI 


A romantic fiodday 
seqneCto Jane Austen's 
:Pride & 'Prejudice 



(yy Lauren (junderson 
& Margot MeCcon 

JfoyiM'B’E'R 30 - 
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fri-tue 11:15 1:10 5:30 
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LEAVENOTRACE 11:15 4:00 8:45 

WETHEANIMALS 1:50 6:35 
SORRY TO BOTHER YOU 
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WED-THU 11:00 
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DAILY 11:40 2:45 6:00 8:40 

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Serving the Eugene Community for Over 35 Years! 


WOMAN WALKS AHEAD (R) 

Catherine Weldon (Jessica Chastain), a portrait painter from 1890s Brooklyn, travels 
to Dakota to paint a portrait of Chief Sitting Bull (Michael Greyeyes) and becomes 
embroiled in the Lakota peoples' struggle over the rights to their land. Based on 
true events. 

Friday - Tuesday 1:00,3:15,5:30,7:45 
Wednesday 1:00,3:15,8:00 
Thursday 1:00,3:15,5:30,7:45 

PUZZLE (R) (Final Week!) 

Agnes (Kelly Macdonald), taken for granted as a suburban mother, discovers 
a passion for solving jigsaw puzzles, which unexpectedly draws her into a new 
world - where her life unfolds in ways she could never have imagined. Co-starring 
Irrfan Khan. 

1:15,5:45 

BUNDSPOTTING (R) (Final Week!) 

Lifelong friends Daveed Diggs and Rafael Casal co-wrote and star in this timely and 
wildly entertaining story about the intersection of race and class, set against the 
backdrop of a rapidly gentrifying Oakland. 

3:30,8:00 
EOS presents 

l # CLAUDE MONET 

(Encore Screening) 

S8.00 General Admission. No discounts or passes. 

Wednesday 6:00 pm 


TICKET PRICES: MATINEE before 5pm $6 
ADULT $8 | STUDENT $7 | SENIOR 62+ $6 CHILD age 12 & under S6 


EUGENEWEEKLY.COM • SEPTEMBER 6, 20 l 8 

































OK, Eugene, get ready to BRING it on. Sure, it’s been 18 years 
since the classic cheerleading movie featuring Kirsten Dunst 
hit theaters, but, more importantly, it’s the 10th Anniversary 
of BRING’s Home and Garden Tour. The nonprofit is celebrating 
10 years of a self-guided tour that shows Eugene’s sustainable 
indoor and outdoor living spaces. Forthe anniversary, BRING 
focuses on the theme of “Building Community.” The tour will 
include the Arcadia Townhomes, which explores what’s possi¬ 
ble when churches are converted. The celebration will feature 
an after party at the final stop of the tour. At the party, you can 
find out how easy it is to own an electric vehicle, so you can 
partake in National Drive Electric Week in Eugene. Of course, 
food, drink and pleasant company will be present as well. 
BRING’s Home and Garden Tour is Sunday, Sept. 9. Tour hours 
are 10 am to 4 pm and an after party is 3 to 6 pm. For informa¬ 
tion on buying tickets, visit bringrecycling.org. Advanced tick¬ 
ets are $10 and day-of-tour tickets are $14. — Henry Houston 


THURSDAY 

SEPTEMBER 6 

SUNRISE G : 41A M ; SUNSET 7:38PM 
AVG. HIGH 79; AVG. LOW 48 

ART/CRAFT Jerry Ross’ 

Courbet’s Tent, Raven’s, 790 
Willamette St. FREE 

Celebration of local artist: Perry 
Johnson, 10am-2pm, Historic 
Mims House, 330 High St. FREE 

Exhibit of Antique Hand Woven 
Flat Weave Middle Eastern 
Weavings, 10am-5pm, Eugene 
Textile Ctr., 1510 Jacob’s Dr. 

FREE 

Robert Canaga: Smaller Works, 
llam-5pm, Whiteaker Print- 
makers, 1328 W. 2nd Ave. FREE 

Mark Clarke “Classics” Show, 
noon-5:30pm, Karin Clarke Gal¬ 
lery, 760 Willamette St. FREE 

Erich Schwartzwald, noon-6pm, 
WOW Hall Lobby, 291 W. 8th 
Ave. FREE 

Annual Show by Gallery Artists, 
2-5pm, White Lotus Gallery, 767 
Willamette St. FREE 

BENEFIT Pints Gone Wild!, 

6-7:30pm, Ninkasi Tasting 
Room, 272 Van Buren St., bene¬ 
fit for Cascadia Wetlands. FREE 

FARMERS MARKETS Amazon 
Farmers Market, llam-4pm, 
Amazon Community Ctr, 2700 
Hilyard St. FREE 

The Corner Market, fresh local 
produce, noon-6pm today, 
tomorrow, Saturday 8c Thursday, 
Sept. 13 8c Sunday 10am-4pm, 
295 River Rd., 541-513-4527. 
FREE 

Riverbend Produce Stand, 
2-6pm, Riverbend Hospital, 

3333 Riverbend Dr., Spfd. FREE 

South Valley Farmers Market, 
4-7pm, 7th 8c Main St,., Cottage 
Grove. FREE 

FILM Plank Town Presents: Little 
Miss Sunshine, Springfilm On 
the Move September, 6:30pm, 
Wildish Theater, 630 Main St. 
FREE 

GATHERINGS Overeaters Anon¬ 
ymous, on summer hiatus until 
Sept. 22, 7-8am today, Tuesday 
8c Thursday, First Christian 
Church, 1236 Oak St. oaeugene. 
org, call 541-686-6622 for 
security code. FREE or don. 

NAMI Lane County Friendship 
Group, lOam-noon, Jack Sprats, 
510 E. Main St., Cottage Grove. 
FREE 

Healing Through Discussion 
Support Group, 10:30am-noon 
Thursday 8c Tuesday, Trauma 
Healing Project, 1110 Char- 
nelton St. $5. 

Downtown Public Speakers 
Toastmasters Club, drop-ins 
welcome, noon-l:05pm today 
8c Thursday, Sept. 13, Les Lyle 
Conference rm., 4th fl. Wells 
Fargo Bldg., 99 E. Broadway 
Ave., 541-485-1182. FREE 

Hearing Voices and Extreme 
States Discussion/Support 
Group, 1pm, Lane Independent 
Living Alliance, 20 E. 13th Ave. 
FREE 


issues, l-2:30pm today 8c 
Thursday, Sept. 13, 2411 Martin 
Luther King Jr. Blvd. FREE 

NAMI Mindfulness Group, 4-5pm 
today 8c Thursday, Sept. 13, 

NAMI Resource Ctr., 2411 Martin 
Luther King Blvd., 541-520- 
3096. FREE 

Nature Kids: Draw Birds, 4pm, 
Downtown Public Library, 100 
W, 10th Ave. FREE 

Family Steam, 4pm, Eugene 
Library Bethel Branch. FREE 

Men’s Meet Up, for survivors of 
sexual assault, self-identified 
men 18+, 4:30-6pm today 8c 
Thursday, Sept. 13, SASS, 591 W. 
19th Ave. FREE 

Citizens Climate Lobby, Lane 
County Chapter, 5:30pm, First 
United Methodist Church, 
Library, 1376 Olive St. FREE 

Capital 8c Grants for your Small 
Business, 6pm, Eugene Library 
Bethel Branch. FREE 

Lane County NAMI LGBTQIA+ 
Connection Group, 6-7:30pm 
today 8c Thursday, Sept. 13, 

HIV Alliance, 1195A City View 
St. FREE 

Emerald Photographic Society 
Club Meeting, 6:45pm today 8c 
Thursday, Sept. 13, Northwood 
Christian Church, 2425 Harvest 
Ln., Spfd. FREE 

Reversing Global Warming, 6:45 
pm, Eugene Mindworks, 207 E. 
5th Ave., FREE 

STAR Voting for Lane County 
campaign meeting, 7pm, 
AFSCME Hall, 688 Charnelton 
St. FREE 

NAMI Lane County’s Friends 
8c Family Support Group, 

7-8:30pm, NAMI Resource Ctr., 
2411 Martin Luther King Blvd. 
FREE 

Atheist, Agnostics 8c Free Think¬ 
er AA, 12-Step Meeting, 7-8pm 
today 8c Thursday, Sept. 13, 
Unitarian Universalist Church, 
2385 W. 13th Ave., 541-953- 
5119.FREE 

NAMI Lane County’s Family to 
Family Support Group, reserved 
for graduates of the NAMI Fam¬ 
ily to Family class, 7-8:30pm, 
NAMI Resource Ctr., 2411 MLK 
Jr. Blvd. FREE 

HEALTH Tai Chi in the Park 
Blocks, 8:30am-9:30am today, 
Tuesday 8c Thursday, Sept. 13, 
West Park Blocks, 8th Ave. 8c 
Oak St. FREE 

White Bird now offers free walk- 
in counseling 8c referral, 5:30- 
7:30pm today 8c Thursday, Sept. 
13, downtown library. FREE 

KIDS/FAMILIES Babies-Tod- 
dlers Storytime, 4pm today 
8c Thursday, Sept. 13,11am 
Wednesdays, Goose Resale, 
1075 Chambers, 541-343-1300. 
FREE 

Family STEAM, enjoy hands- 
on fun 8c learning together 
w/science, technology, etc., 

4pm today 8c Thursday, Sept. 

13, Bethel Library, 1990 Echo 
Hollow Rd. FREE 

Table Tennis for kids, 4:45- 
6:15pm today, Tuesday 8c Thurs¬ 
day, Sept. 13, Boys 8c Girls Club, 
1545 W. 22nd St., eugenettclub. 
com or 541-515-2861. FREE w/ 
membership. 

LECTURES/CLASSES Song 
writing Workshop with Sarah B. 
Rose, 7pm, WOW Hall, 291W. 8th 
Ave. $20. 

Chair Yoga forthe elderly, 
10-llam today, Tuesday 8c 
Thursday, Sept. 13, St. Thomas 
Episcopal Church, 1465 Coburg 
Rd. Don. 

Talks at the MNCH, 2pm today 
through Sunday, Tuesday 
through Thursday, Museum of 
Natural 8c Cultural History, 2380 
E. 15th Ave., natural-history. 
uoregon.edu. FREE w/price of 
museum admission. 


Learn to Meditate, 6pm, Open 
Sky Shambhala, 783 Grant St. 
$15. 

The Goldfish That Barked, 6:30- 
8:30pm, Stellaria Building, 150 
Shelton-McMurphy Blvd. $10.. 

ON THE AIR “The Point,” current 
local issues, arts, stories, 
9-9:30am, today, tomorrow 8c 
Monday through Thursday, Sept. 
13, KPOV 88.9FM. 

“What a Long Strange Trip It’s 
Been w/Wally Bowen,” 7-8pm, 
K0CF92.5 FM. 

“Arts Journal,” current local arts, 
9-10pm today 8c Thursday, Sept. 
13. Comcast channel 29. 

Thursday Night Jazz w/David 
Gizara, 10pm today 8c Thursday, 
Sept. 13, KLCC89.7FM. 

OUTDOORS/RECREATION 

Pool Hall for seniors, 8:30am- 
4:30pm today, tomorrow 8c 
Monday through Thursday, Sept. 
13, Campbell Community Ctr., 
155 High St. $0.25. 

Lunchtime Running Group, 3-4 
miles, 12:15-12:45pm today 8c 
Thursday, Sept. 13, Tap 8c Growl¬ 
er, 207 E. 5th Ave. FREE 

Duplicate Bridge, 1pm today, 
Sunday, Tuesday 8c Thursday, 
Sept. 13; 9:30am Monday; 
6:30pm Wednesday, Emerald 
Bridge Club, 1782 Centennial 
Blvd., Spfd. $8. 

Centennial chess club, 5-8pm 
today, Friday, Saturday 8c 
Thursday, Sept. 13, Centennial 
Market, 651 W. Centennial Blvd., 
Spfd. RSVP 541-912-9061. FREE 

Cribbage Tournament, 5:30- 
7:30pm today 8c Thursday, Sept. 
13, Max’s Tavern, 550 E. 13th 
Ave. $2. 

Tai Chi, 5:30-6:30pm today 8c 
Thursday, Sept. 13, Willamalane 
Adult Activity Ctr., 215 W.CSt., 
Spfd. FREE drop in. 

Board Game Night, 6-llpm 
today, Tuesday 8c Thursday, 
Sept. 13, Funagain Games, 1280 
Willamette St. FREE 

Categorically Correct Trivia w/ 
Elliot Martinez, 6:30-8pm today 
8c Thursday, Sept. 13, Oregon 
Wine LAB. FREE 

Adult intro to ki-aikido, 7pm To¬ 
day, Monday 8c Thursday, Sept. 
13, OKS, 1071 W. 7th. FREE 

WDYK Trivia w/Alan, 7pm today 
8c Thursday, Sept. 13, Gateway 
Grill, 3198 Gateway St., Spfd., 
541-653-8876. FREE 

WDYK Trivia w/Stephanie, 7pm 
today 8c Thursday, Sept. 13, El 
Tapatio, 725 E. Gibbs Ave., Cot¬ 
tage Grove, 541-767-0457. FREE 

Cards Against Humanity w/ 
Quincy, 9-llpm, Twisted Duck, 
533 W. Centennial Blvd. FREE 

Quizzo Pub Trivia w/Dr. Seven 
Phoenix, 9pm, Level Up, 1290 
Oak St. FREE 

WDYK Trivia w/Kevin, 9pm today 
8c Thursday, Sept. 13, Side Bar, 
2380 Coburg Rd., #108. FREE 

Blazing Paddles, table tennis 
club (ping pong), We welcome 
all ages 8c skill levels, drop-ins 
welcome, paddles provided, 
varying hours today through 
Thursday, Sept. 13, check 
website for times 8c occasional 
cancellations, lanetabletennis. 
net. $5. 

SOCIAL DANCE Line Dance Les¬ 
sons, 6-8pm today 8c Thursday, 
Sept. 13, The Blind Pig Bar, 2750 
Roosevelt Blvd. FREE 

Crossroads Blues Fusion, 
beginning 8c intermediate blues 
dancing lessons 7-8pm today 8c 
Thursday, Sept. 13, open dance 

8-ll:30pm, Vet’s Club, 2320 Wil¬ 
lamette St. $6-$10, work-trade 
available. 

Fall Dance Sampler Series, Tan¬ 
go, 7:30pm, In Shape Athletic 
Club, 2681 Willamette St. $10. 

SPIRITUAL Zen Meditation 
Group, 7-8am today 8c Thursday, 


September 6, 2018 • eugeneweekly.com 


NAMI Connection Support Group 
for people w/mental health 





















CALENDAR 


Sept. 13, Blue Cliff Zen Ctr., 439 
W. 2nd Ave. FREE 

Refuge Recovery Group, Ppm, 
Unitarian Universalist Church, 
1685 W. 13th Ave. FREE 

Zen Meditation, P-8:45pm today 
8c Thursday, Sept. 13, Zen West, 
981 Fillmore St., zenwesteu- 
gene@gmail.com. FREE 

THEATER THE SLOTH: True 
stories, told live, P:30-9:30pm 
today 8c Thursday, Sept. 13, Atri¬ 
um Bldg., 99 W. 10th Ave. FREE 

No Shame Theatre Workshop, 
8:30pm, Atrium Bldg., 99 W. 
10th Ave., FREE 

Monique La Faye’s Drag Battle, 
9pm, The Drake, PP W. Broad¬ 
way. FREE 

Drag Takeover, 10:30pm 8c 
12:30am, The Drake, PPW. 
Broadway. FREE 


FRIDAY 

SEPTEMBER 7 

SUNRISE 6:42AM; SUNSET 7:36PM 
AVG. HIGH 79; AVG. LOW 48 

ART/CRAFT Fast Forward: The 
Mayor’s Teen Art Show, 10am 
(reception, 6pm), Maude Kerns 
Art Center, 1910 E. 15th Ave. 
FREE 

Free First Friday at the Museum, 
llam-5pm, Museum of Natural 
8c Cultural History, 1680 E. 15th 
Ave. FREE 

Untethered: A show about Free¬ 
dom 8c Flux by Aidan Holpuch, 
5:30pm, MODERN, 20P E. 5th 
Ave., Ste. 105. FREE 

“Look Me in the Eye” Exhibition, 
5:30pm, Lincoln Gallery, W. 

4th Avenue and Lincoln Street. 
FREE 

Erich Schwartzwald at WOW Hall 
continues. See Sept. 6. 

Mark Clarke “Classics” Show 
continues. See Thursday, Sept. 
6 . 

Celebration of local artist: Perry 
Johnson continues. See Thurs¬ 
day, Sept. 6. 

Annual Show by Gallery Artists 
continues. See Thursday, Sept. 
6 . 

Jerry Ross’ Courbet’s Tent con¬ 
tinues. See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Exhibit of Antique Hand Woven 
Flat Weave Middle Eastern 
Weavings continues. See Thurs¬ 
day, Sept 6. 

BENEFIT First Friday book 
sale, 3:30-P:30pm, Downtown 
Public Library, 100 W. 10th 
Ave., benifiting child reading 
programs. FREE 

COMEDY Eugene’s Best 
Medicine Presents: Straight, 
Awkward, White Men, Ppm, The 
Drake, PP W. Broadway. $5. 

FOOD/DRINK Friday Night 
Burgers 8c Blues, 6-9pm, Pfeiffer 
Winery, 25040 Jaeg Rd. FREE 

GATHERINGS Yawn Patrol 
Toastmasters, 6-P:45am, LCC 
Downtown Ctr., 110 W. 10th Ave. 
FREE 

Nar-Anon Meeting, 12:30pm, 
Spfd Lutheran Church, 1542 I 
St.,Spfd. FREE 

Free First Friday at the Museum, 
llam-5pm, Museum of Natural 
8c Cultural History, 2380 E. 15th 
Ave. FREE 

Food Not Bombs, 1pm cooking, 
Campbell Club, 3pm serving, 
Kesey Square. FREE 

Lane County NAMI Connections 
Group Cottage Grove, 1:30- 
3:30pm, Healing Matrix, 632 
Main St., Cottage Grove. FREE 

Green Drinks, 5-Ppm, New Day 
Bakery, 449 Blair Blvd. FREE 

Fiesta Cultural, 5:30pm, Kesey 
Square. FREE 

Layers of Lear, 6pm, Downtown 
Public Library, 100 W. 10th Ave. 
FREE 


Eugene Maker Space Open 
Hack, 6-8pm today 8c Tuesday, 
68P McKinley St., eugenemak- 
erspace.com. FREE 

Is Love All There Is? A Night of 
Messages w/5 Intuitives, Q8cA, 
Ppm, Unity of the Valley, 3912 
Dillard Rd. $10-30. 

HEALTH Tai chi for Balance or 
Yoga Therapy sessions: 30 min 
each, 3pm, Sacred Heart medical 
Ctr. lobby, 3333 Riverbend Dr., 
Spfd. Don. 

Friday Night Sound Healing, 
6-Ppm, Pura Vida Glamping 
Getaway, 45560 South Gate Rd., 
Vida. $20. 

KIDS/FAMILIES Baby Storytime, 
10:15 8c 11:15am, Downtown 
Public Library, 100 W. 10th Ave. 
FREE 

Family Storytime, 10:15am, 
Eugene Public Library Bethel 
Branch 8c Sheldon Branch. FREE 

LECTURES/CLASSES Talks at 
the MNCH continues. See Thurs¬ 
day, Sept. 6. 

ONTHEAIR Music Gumbo w/ 
Andy Goldfinger, 6-9pm today 8c 
Monday, KOFC 92.5 FM. 

Water is Life w/Jana Thrift and 
John Abbe, 6pm, 9P.3 FM or 
KEPW,org. 

Marc Time’s Record Attic, 
11:30pm, Comcast channel 29. 

“The Point” continues. See 
Thursday, Sept. 6. 

OUTDOORS/RECREATION Magic 
the Gathering, standard deck 
casual play, 6pm, Castle of 
Games, 660 Main, Spfd. $1. 

Trivia Night on the Farm, 6-8pm, 
Agrarian Ales, 31115 W. Cross¬ 
roads Ln., Coburg. FREE 

Game Night, learn 8c play 
tabletop games, P-9pm. Barnes 
8c Noble, 1233 Valley River Dr. 
FREE 

Cards Against Humanity w/ 
Quincy, 9-llpm, Twisted Duck, 
533 W. Cenntenial Blvd., Spfd. 
FREE 

Blazing Paddles continues. See 
Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Centennial chess club contin¬ 
ues. See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Pool Hall continues. See Thurs¬ 
day, Sept. 6. 

SOCIAL DANCE Advanced 
dance class w/Taller de Son 
Jarocho, 4:30-6pm, Whiteaker 
Community Ctr., N. Jackson 8c 
Clark St. FREE 

#instaballet, 5:30pm, Capitello 
Wines, 540 Charnelton St. FREE 

Modern Square Dance Lessons, 
P:30-9pm, Emerald Square 
Dance Ctr., 2095 Yolanda, Spfd. 
FREE 

Argentine Tango Dance Classes, 
8-9:15pm, Celebration Belly 
Dance 8c Yoga Studio, 1840 
Willamette St., Ste. 206. $10. 

Dancing, 10pm-2:30am today 
8c tomorrow, The Drake, ?? W. 
Broadway. FREE 

SPIRITUAL Refuge Recovery, 
Ppm, today 8c Monday, Buddha 
Eye Temple, 2190 Garfield St. 
FREE 

Zen Meditation Group, good for 
beginners ?:30-8:30pm, Blue 
Cliff Zen Ctr., 439 W. 2nd Ave. 
FREE 

THEATER No Shame Theatre, A 
Variety Show in 15 (Five-Min¬ 
ute) Acts, ?:30-9:30pm, Atrium 
Building, 99 W. 10th Ave. FREE 

Trek Theatre presents The Inner 
Light, 5pm, Amazon Community 
Ctr. FREE 

VOLUNTEER First Fridays at 
Finn Rock Reach, 10am-2pm, 
Finn Rock Reach, Finn Rod Boat 
Landing, Quartz Creek Rd. FREE 

Native Plant Nursery Volunteer 
Work Party, l-4pm, Alton Baker 
Park, Native Plant Nursery. 

FREE 


SATURDAY 

SEMPTEMBER8 

SUNRISE 6:43AM; SUNSET 7:34PM 
AVG. HIGH 79; AVG. LOW 48 

ART/CRAFT Thirst 2 Create 
Paint Party, “DONKEY BOY!”, 
3am-5:30pm, BlackSheep 
Squadron, 84610 S. Hideway 
Hills Rd. $35. 

David N Jones - Paper, Shell and 
Flowers - High Key Photographic 
Images, 3-6pm The O’Brien 
Photo Gallery, 2833 Willamette 
St., Ste. B. FREE 

Go Ducks! Weekends at the 
museums, llam-5pm, Jordan 
Schnitzer Museum 8c Museum 
of Natural 8c Cultural History. 
FREE 

Art Space, 3-5pm, The Crafty 
Mercantile, 51? E. Main St., 
Cottage Grove, don. 

Fast Forward: The Mayor’s Teen 
Art Show continues. See Friday. 

Erich Schwartzwald at WOW Hall 
continues. See Sept. 6. 

Mark Clarke “Classics” Show 
continues. See Thursday, Sept. 
6 . 

Celebration of local artist: Perry 
Johnson continues. See Sept. 6. 

Annual Show by Gallery Artists 
continues. See Thursday, Sept. 
6 . 

Jerry Ross’ Courbet’s Tent con¬ 
tinues. See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Exhibit of Antique Hand Woven 
Flat Weave Middle Eastern 
Weavings continues. See Thurs¬ 
day, Sept 6. 

BENEFITS Murder in Disguise, 
6-8:30pm, Very Little Theatre, 
2350 Hilyard St., benefitingthe 
Eugene Symphony. $22.50-45. 

Walterville Fair 8c Waddle, 8am- 
4pm, Walterville Community 
Ctr., 39259 Camp Creek Rd., 
benefitingthe Walterville Com¬ 
munity Hall. FREE 

COMEDY Comedy Open Mic, 
6:30pm signup, Ppm open mic, 
Cush Cafe, 1305 Railroad Blvd. 
$2-$3 don. 

Vaudeville Night, ?:30-9:30pm, 
Vanilla Jills, 298 Blair Blvd. $5. 

FARMERS MARKETS Hideaway 
Bakery Farmers Market, 9am- 
2pm, Hideaway Bakery, 33?? E. 
Amazon. FREE 

Lane County Farmers Market, 
9am-3pm, 8th Avenue 8c Oak 
Street. FREE 

Eugene Saturday Market, 10am- 
5pm, 8th 8c Oak. FREE 

Good Food Easy Farm Stand, 
10am-2pm, Creswell Bakery, 
182 S. 2nd St., Creswell. FREE 

Spencer Creek Community 
Growers Market, 10am-2pm, 
Spencer Creek Grange, 86013 
Lorane Hwy. FREE 

Little Wings Farm Stand, 10am- 
2pm, Tacovore, 530 Blair Blvd. 
FREE 

The Corner Market continues. 
See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

GATHERINGS Al-Anon, friends 8c 
family of alcoholics, beginners 
meeting, 9am, Bethesdal Lu¬ 
theran Church, 4445 Royal Ave., 
541-554-3P0?. FREE 

Bow Wow Around Town, 9:30am, 
913 S. River Rd., Cottage Grove. 
$10 don./$15 per family. 

Our Revolution Lane County, 
llam-lpm, Theo’s Coffee 
House, 199 W. 8th Ave., ourrevo- 
lutionlanecounty.com. FREE 

Metaphysical 8c Wellness Fair, 
Free Intuitive Panel, Talks All 
Day, 45+ Vendors, noon-8pm, 
Unity of the Valleyt, 3912 Dillard 
Rd. FREE 

Narrowly Mended, noon-4pm, 
Kesey Square. FREE 

Co-Dependents Anonymous, 

12 step meeting, noon-lpm, 




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Telepathic Animal Communicator 

By phone or in person. 

Reiki and Flower Essence Practitioner 
Holistic Horse Trainer 
541-514-6357 

Sliding Scale Available. 

See Kate at the Metaphysical Wellness Fair 
Sat. Sept 8 at Unity! 



Back to School Sale 


Free entry level helmet ($45) with $400 bike purchase 

(9/5-9/16, provide Student ID with purchase) 


5 Charnelton St (541)344-4105 

'480 Alder St. (541)342-6155 

For more deals go to bicycleway.com 



Dance 

Performances 


Free Bike 
Repairs 


Live Music 


Free Yoga 
and more! 


Eugene 


SUNDAY 


WEST EUGENE 
CHURCHILL 

NEIGHBORHOODS 


V> et the Good Titp 


Learn More at: 

eugenesundaystreets.org 

Email: 

SundayStreets@ci.eugene.or.us 


tfeugenesundaystreets 


'Parking 


B PcaCCHcfllfh 


incr^dibles 


EUGENEWEEKLY.COM • SEPTEMBER 6, 20 l 8 























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br,no GARDEN 




SEPTEMBER 9,2018 • 10AM-4PM 



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CALENDAR 

White Bird Clinic, 341 E. 12th 
Ave. FREE 

Drum Circle, hand drums 
preferred, noon-5pm, Cush Cafe, 
1305 Railroad Blvd. FREE 

Peace Vigil, noon-lpm, down¬ 
town library, info at 541-484- 
5099.FREE 

Northwest Dog Project’s 4th 
anniversary Celebration, 4-9pm, 
Viking Braggot Southtowne, 

520 Commercial St., Unit F. FREE 

HEALTH Flow Yoga, ages 18+, 
llam-noon, Willamalane Adult 
Activity Ctr., 215 W. C St., Spfd. $9. 

White Bird Walk-In Counseling 
8c Referral continues. See 
Thursday. 

KIDS/FAMILIES Family Explora¬ 
tion Day, lOam-noon, Tsanchifin 
Trail, 251 S. Danebo St. FREE 

Legos, 10:15am, Sheldon 
branch library, 10:15am, Bethel 
branch library, 541-682-8323. 
FREE 

Family Music Time, 10:15am, 
Downtown Public Library, 100 
W. 10th Ave. FREE 

Helping Troubled Youth, 
10:30am-noon , Westminster 
Presbyterian Church, 222 
Coburg Rd. FREE 

Table Tennis for kids, 1:30- 
2:30pm, Boys 8c Girls Club, 1545 
W. 22nd St., eugenettclub.com 
or 541-515-2861. FREE 

Koto 8c Shamisen: Masumi 
Timson, 2pm, Downtown Public 
Library, 100 W. 10th Ave. FREE 

Yarn 8c Thread, 3-5pm, Eugene 
Public Library Sheldon Branch. 
FREE 

LECTURES/CLASSES Content¬ 
ment in Everyday Life, 10am- 
noon, Open Sky Shambhala, 283 
Grant St. $50 sug. don. 

Walk 8c Talk at the Museum, 
2-3pm, Museum of Natural 8c 
Cultural History, 1650 E. 15th 
Ave. reg. admis. 

ON THE AIR Country Classics, 

Hot Licks 8c Hipbilly favorites, ft. 
artist Hank Williams, 9-llam, 
KRVM. 

Taste of the World w/Wagoma, 
cooking 8c cultural program, 
9-10am today, 2-8pm Tuesdays, 
Comcast channel 29. 

Music Hour w/ Wally Bowen, 

1- 2pm today 8c tomorrow, 92.5 
KOCF 

Reverb w/Sean Cummins, 

2- 4pm, 92.5 KOCF. 

60s Beat, “Keeping the Spirit of 
the 60s Alive,” 2-9pm, KRVM. 

The Institute of Spectra-Sonic 
Sound, lOpm-midnight, 92.3, 
KEPW. 

The Dr. Yeti Show, lOpm-mid- 
night today 8c tomorrow, 92.5, 
KOCF 

OUTDOORS/RECREATION 

All-Paces Group Run, 9am, Run 
Hub Northwest, 515 High St., 
541-344-1309. FREE 

First Saturday Park Walk - Gold¬ 
en Gardens, 9-llam, meet at 
entrance on Jessen Dr. FREE 

Weed Identification Walk, 
ll:30am-12:30am, Grassroots 
Garden, 1465 Coburg Rd. FREE 

Amtgard Iron Keep LARP, 
Emerald Park, 1pm, 1400 Lake 
Dr. FREE 

Blazing Paddles continues. See 
Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Centennial chess club contin¬ 
ues. See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

SOCIAL DANCE Belly Dance 
Shows, 2pm, Medityerranean 
Network Restaurant, 1810 
Willamette St. $5. 

Dancing, 10pm-2:30am, The 
Drake Bar, 22 W. Broadway. 

FREE 

SPIRITUAL Contemplative Mass 
w/Taize chant, 5:30-6:30pm, 
Episcopal Church of the Ressu- 
rection, 3925 Hilyard St. FREE 


THEATER Trek Theatre presents 
The Inner Light, 2pm, Amazon 
Community Ctr. FREE 

VOLUNTEER Friends of Trees 
Community Pruning Event IV, 
8:45am-noon, meet at 12th 8c 
Lincoln. FREE 

Feed the Hungry w/Burrito Bri¬ 
gade, 10am, Bethesda Lutheran 
Church, 4445 Royal Ave. FREE 

SUNDAY 

SEPTEMBER 9 

SUNRISE 6:45AM; SUNSET ?:33PM 
AVG. HIGH ? 9; AVG. LOW 48 

ART/CRAFT Celebration of local 
artist: Perry Johnson continues. 
See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Erich Schwartzwald at WOW Hall 
continues. See Sept. 6. 

Go Ducks! Weekends at the mu¬ 
seums continues. See Saturday. 

Jerry Ross’ Courbet’s Tent con¬ 
tinues. See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

BENEFIT 2018 Pirate Ferret Agil¬ 
ity Trials, noon-4pm, 1400 Lake 
Dr., benefiting Lane Area Ferret 
Shelter and Rescue. .25 to $3. 
Paws in the Garden, tour private 
gardens w/ chance encounters 
of dogs 8c cats, 10am-2pm, 
visit green-hill.org for location. 
S15-S20. 

COMEDY Sunday Bloody Sun¬ 
day! Welcome To Hell: A Comedy 
Open Mic, 8pm, Old Nick’s Pub, 
211 Washington St. FREE 

Comedy open mic, 10pm, Cornu¬ 
copia 5th St. FREE 

FARMERS MARKET Fairmount 
Neighborhood Sunday Farmers 
Market, 10am-2pm, 19th Ave. 8c 
Agate St. FREE 

Little Wings Farm Stand, 10am- 
2pm, Tacovore, 530 Blair Blvd. 
FREE 

Whiteaker Community Market, 
llam-4pm, Whiteaker Commu¬ 
nity Market, 1111 2nd Ave. FREE 

Dexter Lake Farmers Market, 
noon-4pm, Rolling Rock Park, at 
the corner of Shore Dr., Lowell. 
FREE 

FOOD/DRINK Let’s Make Apple 
No-Bake “Cookies”!, 2-4pm, 
Natural Grocers, 201 Coburg 
Rd. FREE 

GATHERINGS BRING Home 8c 
Garden Tour, 10am-4pm, var¬ 
ious locations, bringrecycling. 
org. $10-14. 

Occupy Eugene Medical Clinic, 
noon-4pm, 1212 Centennial 
Blvd., Stes. 4 8c 2, Spfd. FREE 

Eugene River Festival, noon- 
5pm, Alton Baker Park, 622 Day 
Island Rd. FREE 

Food Not Bombs, 2-4pm, Park 
Blocks, 8th 8c Oak St. FREE 

Celebrate 8c Activate MRG 
Foundation, 3-5pm, Campbell 
Community Ctr., 155 High St. 
FREE 

Eugene Gothic Weekend! The 
Dark Arts Market, l-2pm, Old 
Nick’s Pub, 211 Washington St. 
FREE 

HEALTH Yoga at the Lab, 
10:30am, Oregon Wine Lab, 488 
Lincoln St. $15. 

Yoga at the Oregon Wine Lab, 
10:30-ll:30am, 455 Lincoln 
St. $15. 

Family Yoga on the Farm, 
ll:15am-12:15pm, Agrarian 
Ales, 31115 W. Crossroads Lane 
West. $18. 

KIDS/FAMILIES “The Free Rang¬ 
ers Station”, noon-4pm, Dexter 
Lake Farmers Market. FREE 

Grandparents Pioneer Tea, 
3-5pm, Historic One Room 
Schoolhouse, 91949 Purkerson 
Rd., Junction City. $10-20. 

LECTURES/CLASSES Walk 8c 
Talk at the Museum continues. 
See Saturday. 


ON THE AIR “The Sunday Morn¬ 
ing Hangover TV Show,” 1:30am, 
Comcast channel 29. 

“The Sunday Morning Hangover Ra¬ 
dio Program” w/Marc Time, 10am, 
KWVA 88.1FM 8c kwvaradio.org. 

Son of Saturday Gold, True stuff 
for true believers, ft. artist Sam 
Cooke, llam-lpm, KRVM. 

Reverb w/Sean Cummins, 2pm, 
92.5 KOCF 

Music Hour w/Wally Bowen 
continues. See Saturday. 

Talks at the MNCH continues. 
See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Dr. Yeti Show continues. See 
Saturday. 

OUTDOORS/RECREATION Bird 
Walk, 8am, 8 am, Mount Pisgah 
Arboretum, 34901 Frank Parrish 
Rd. $5, members FREE 

Eug/Spfld Mossbacks 
Volkssport Club, 8 am, walk 
thru Swan Island Dahlia Farm in 
Canby. $10. 

Play Petanque! Easy to learn/ 
fun to play, free lessons, 

10am-l Sundays 8c 6pm-dark 
Wednesdays, University Park, 
University Ave 8c 24th Ave. FREE 

Final Table Poker, 3pm 8c 6pm, 
Steve’s Bar 8c Grill, 112 14th St., 
Spfd. FREE 

Malabon Players Society, adult 
pick up basketball, 3pm, Mala¬ 
bon Elementary School, 1380 
Taney St. FREE 

Blazing Paddles continues. See 
Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Duplicate Bridge continues. See 
Thursday, Sept. 6. 

SOCIAL DANCE USA Dance, 
5-9:30pm, Veterans’ Memorial 
Club, 1626 Willamette St. $2-10. 

Veselo Folk Dancers, interna¬ 
tional folk dancing, 2:15-10pm, 

In Shape Athletic Club, 2681 Wil¬ 
lamette St., 541-683-3326. $3. 

Sup! Dance Party, 9pm-2am, 
Cowfish Dance Club, 62 W. 
Broadway. FREE 

SPIRITUAL Self Realization Fel¬ 
lowship 9-9:50am meditation; 
10-llam service, 2310 Olive 
St. FREE 

Zen Meditation Group, 5:30- 
2pm, Blue Cliff Zen Ctr., 439 W. 
2nd Ave. FREE The Essence of 
Insight Meditation, a 6-week 
mindfulness series, 6-8:15am, 
Unitarian Church of Eugene, 
2385 W. 13th Ave. $90-$ 120. 

Ad 01am Rosh Hashanah 
Services, 6:30pm, Unity of the 
Valley, 3912 Dillard Rd. FREE 

Refuge Recovery Meeting, 
2-8:30pm, Open Sky Shambhala 
Ctr., 283 Grant St. 

Gnostic Mass Celebration, 8pm, 
CophNia Lodge 0T0,4065 W. 
11th Ave. #43, cophnia-oto. 
org. FREE 

THEATER Auditions for The Bogs 
in the Band, 6:30-8pm, Very 
Little Theatre, 2350 Hilyard St. 
FREE 

Trek Theatre presents The Inner 
Light continues. See Saturday. 

VOLUNTEER Interfaith Sunday 
breakfast, needs volunteers! all/ 
no faiths, everyone welcome, 
serving over 400 people every 
Sunday, 6:30-10:30am, First 
Christian Church, 1236 Oak St., 
volunteers please contact Susan 
at 541-343-4392 or breakfast 
heartofeugene.org. FREE 

Feed the Hungry w/ Burrito 
Brigade, 11am, First Christian 
Church, 1236 Oak St. FREE 


MONDAY 

SEPTEMBER 10 

SUNRISE 6:46AM; SUNSET ?:31PM 
AVG. HIGH ? 8; AVG. LOW 48 

ART/CRAFT Craft Night, 2pm, 
Cush Cafe, 1305 Railroad Blvd. 
FREE 


September 6, 2018 • eugeneweekly.com 










































































Running sucks. But it’s that kind of sucking that 
can result in some serene moments of mindfulness 
as your feet pound the ground in a mesmerizing 
rhythm. It’s an activity that, in between cursing 
yourself, brings about epiphanies, which are then 
forgotten when you pour a glass of chocolate 
milk. 3100: Run and Become paints a portrait of 
runners undergoingthe endurance of runningthe 
Self-Transcendence 3100 Mile Race. It’s a race that 
takes place on the same block in Queens, New York 
City, 59 times a day for 52 days straight. It’s harder 
than it sounds. Participants run 59.6 miles a day 
all summer. The movie follows three runners who 
run for spiritual enlightenment and not glory: a 
paperboy from Finland, a female cellist from Austria 
and a monk from Japan. 
3100: Run and Become runs Thursday, Sept. 7 to 
Thursday, Sept. 13 at the Broadway Metro, located 
at 43 W. Broadway. Visit broadwaymetro.com for 
show times. $8. — Henry Houston 



Celebration of local artist: 

Perry Johnson continues. See 
Saturday. 

Jerry Ross’ Courbet’s Tent con- 
tinues.see Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Erich Schwartzwald at WOW Hall 
continues. See Sept. 6. 

FOOD/DRINK Quizzo Pub Trivia, 

7-9pm, The Drake Bar, 77 W. 
Broadway. FREE 

Drink 8c Draw, 9pm, prizes, 
drawing 8c $3 Ninkasi pints, 5th 
Street Cornucopia, 20? E. 5th 
Ave. FREE 

GATHERINGS Lunch Bunch 
Toastmasters, noon, LCC 
downtown ctr., 101W. 10th Ave., 
541-687-7678. FREE 

Springfield Lions Club Meeting, 
noon-lpm, Roaring Rapids Pizza 
Company, 4006 Franklin Blvd. 
FREE 

Intro to Online Geology, 3pm, 
Eugene Library Bethel Branch. 
FREE 

Study Club, girls ages 10-18, 
4-5pm, Ophelia’s Place, 1577 
Pearl St., ste. 100. FREE 
Eugene Cannabis TV Record¬ 
ing Session, 4:30pm, CTV-29 
Studios, 2455 Willakenzie Rd., 
contact dankbagman@>hotmail. 
com. FREE 

Women in Black, silent peace 
vigil, 5-5:30pm, Pearl 8c 7th. 
FREE 

Co-Dependents Anonymous, 
12-step meeting, 6-7pm, Well- 
springs Friends School, 3590 W. 
18th Ave. FREE 

Meditation in Everyday Life, 
6-8pm, Open Sky Shambhala, 
783 Grant St. $50. 

Meditation Class, 6-7:30pm, 
Mahasiddha Buddist Center, 777 
High St. $5-10. 

Eugene Peace Choir - Singers 
Welcome!, 6-8pm, Good Sa¬ 




FOR YOUTH DEVELOPMENT 

FOR HEALTHY LIVING 
FOR SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY 



The Y is the largest 4- : 
afterschool childcare 
provider in Lane County. 

w/V -i,- w 

SO MUCH MORE. 

Eugene Family YMCA. Serving Eugene since 1887. 


Learn more at eugeneymca.org NewYMCA.org 


maritan Society, 3500 Hilyard 
St. FREE 

Women’s Choral Society 
Enrollment Opens - Fall Term 
Begins, 6:30-9pm, UO School of 
Music, Rooim 163, 971 E. 18th 
Ave. FREE 

Keep It Simple Spfd Al-Anon 
Family Group, 6:30-7:30, Spfd 
Lutheran Church, 1542 I St., 
Spfd. FREE 

Lane County NAMI Connections 
Group, 6:30pm, Nami Resource 
Ctr., 2411 Martin Luther King 
Blvd. FREE 

Men’s Mentoring Circle, 6:30- 
8:30pm, McKenzie River Men’s 
Center, 1465 Coburg Rd. $10 
sug. don. 

DBSA of Lane County, 7pm, First 
United Methodist Church, 1376 
Olive St. FREE 

Inspirational Sounds Gospel 
Choir Rehearsal, 7pm, North- 
wood Christian Church, 2425 
Harvest Ln. FREE 

Marijuana Anonymous, 12-step 
meeting, 7-8pm, St. Mary’s 
Church, 236 E. 13th Ave. FREE 

Nar-Anon Meeting, 7pm, St. 
Thomas Episcopal Church, 1465 
Coburg Rd. 8c Cottage Grove 
Community Ctr., 700 E. Gibbs 
Ave., Cottage Grove. FREE 

Now recruiting low-voiced wom¬ 
en! Come sing w/Sweet Adeline 
harmonizing group, 7pm, Spfd 
Elks Lodge, 1701 Centennial 
Blvd., Spfd. FREE 

SASS Monday Night Drop-in 
Group, for survivors of sexual 
assault, self-identified women 
18+, ?-8:30pm, 591 W. 19th 
Ave. FREE 

Pinball League Meeting, 

8-9:30pm, Level Up Arcade, 

1290 Oak St. $5. 

Bingo! 9pm, Sam Bond’s Ga¬ 
rage, 407 Blair Blvd. FREE 


HEALTH Tai Chi: Moving for 
Better Balance, ages 18+, 5:30 
8c 6:30pm today 8c Wednesday, 
Willamalane Adult Activity Ctr., 
350 W. C St., Spfd. $?-$9. 

Latin Cardio Fusion, ages 14+, 
jazzy dance workout, 5:30pm 
today 8c Wednesday, Bob Keefer 
Ctr., 250 S. 32nd St., Spfd. 

$?-$9. 

Meditation in Everyday Life, 
6-8pm, Open Sky Shambhala 
Ctr., 783 Grant St. $50. 

Tai chi for Balance or Yoga 
Therapy sessions continues. 

See Friday. 

White Bird Now Free Walk-in 
Counseling 8c Referral contin¬ 
ues. See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

KIDS/FAMILIES Open House, 

9-llam, Tiny Tots Indoor Play¬ 
ground, 2200 Coburg Rd. FREE 

Preschool STEAM, 10:15am, 
Eugene Library Bethel Branch. 
FREE 

Children’s Intro to Ki-aikido, 
4:15pm today 8c Wednesday, 
Oregon Ki Society, 1071 W. ?th 
Ave. FREE 

LECTURES/CLASSES Dance 
Fitness, ages 14+, dance 
yourself fit to pop, jazz 8c more, 
5:30-6:30pm today 8c Wednes¬ 
day, Bob Keefer Ctr., 215 W. C St., 
Spfd. $9. 

DanceAbility Class, creative 
movement for youth 8c adults; 
all abilities 8c disabilities, 5:15- 
6:15pm, CG Body Studio, 28 S. 
6th St. ste. B, Cottage Grove, 
541-357-4982. don. 

ON THE AIR Music Gumbo w/ 
Andy Goldfinger continues. See 
Friday. 

“The Point” continues. See 
Thursday, Sept. 6. 

OUTDOORS/RECREATION 

Qigong, 4:30-5:30pm today 8c 
Wednesday, Willamalane Adult 


Activity Ctr., 215 W. C St., Spfd. 
FREE drop-in. 

Filipino Martial Arts for Fitness, 
5pm, Bob Keefer Ctr., 250 S. 
32nd St., Spfd. FREE intro. 

The Monday Night Running 
Group, 5:30pm, Eugene Running 
Company, 123 Oakway Ctr. FREE 

Trivia at The Pub w/Elliot 
Martinez, 6-8pm, Oakshire, 207 
Madison St. FREE 

Trivia Night, 6-8pm, Gateway 
Grill, 3198 Gateway St., Spfd. 
FREE 

Board Game Night, hosted by 
Funagain Games, Ppm, The Barn 
Light, 924 Willamette St., info at 
thebarnlightbar.com. FREE 

Twisted Trivia, Ppm, Webfoot, 

839 E. 13th Ave. FREE 

Mario Kart Tournament, 9pm- 
2:30am, The Drake Bar, 77 W. 
Broadway. FREE 

Sam Bonds Bingo, 9pm, Sam 
Bonds Garage, 407 Blair St. 

FREE 

Virtual Reality, 9pm, The Drake 
Bar, 77 W. Broadway. FREE 

FREE Adult intro to ki-aikido 
continues. See Thursday, Sept. 

6 . 

Blazing Paddles continues. See 
Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Duplicate Bridge continues. See 
Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Pool Hall continues. See Thurs¬ 
day, Sept. 6. 

SOCIAL DANCE Folk Dancing for 
Seniors, 2:30-4pm, Campbell 
Community Ctr., 155 High St., 
info at 541-603-0998. $.25-$l. 
Dance Empowered w/Cynthia 
Valentine, 5:30-6:30pm, today 
8c Wednesday, WOW Hall. $10. 

“Thriller” Dance Lessons, 

6-7pm, Venue 252, 252 Law¬ 
rence St. FREE 


EW’S BEST INDIAN CUISINE 2016-2017 

Lunch Buffet 

Lunch 11:30am ■ 2:30pm * Dinner 5 _ 9:30pm • Closed Tuesday 


* 906 IN 7TH AVE. • EUGENE, OR * 
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COME FOR THE GROCERY 



Stay and enjoy 

a pint oflcombucha or beer 
on our sunny patio 


Live music every Friday night 

ON OUR PATIO 


Neighborhood spot in the 
heart of the friendly 


2757 Friendly Street 
Open Everday 

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EUGENEWEEKLY.COM • SEPTEMBER 6, 20 l 8 



















CALENDAR 


Samba Ja Fall Beginner Class, 
7:30pm, Corestar Cultural Ctr. 
439 W. 2nd Ave. $50 for 11-week 
session. 

SPIRITUAL Refuge Recovery, 
6-8:30pm, Buddha Eye Temple, 
2190 Garfield St. FREE 

Rudra Meditation (Kundalini 
Yoga Meditation) continues. See 
Thursday, Sept. 6. 

VOLUNTEER Friends of Buford 
Park 8c Mt. Pisgah Habitat 
Restoration Projects, 9am-noon, 
locations vary, volunteer® 
bufordpark.org. FREE 


TUESDAY 

SEPTEMBER 11 

SUNRISE G : 4 ? A M ; SUNSET ?:29PM 
AVG. HIGH 78; AVG. LOW 48 

ARTS/CRAFTS Celebration of 
local artist: Perry Johnson con¬ 
tinues. See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Jerry Ross’ Courbet’s Tent con¬ 
tinues. See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Annual Show by Gallery Artists 
continues. See Thursday, Sept. 
6 . 

Erich Schwartzwald at WOW Flail 
continues. See Sept. 6. 

Robert Canaga: Smaller Works 
continues. See Sept. 6. 

BENEFIT Open Microphone 
Musical Benefit for Habitat for 
Flumanity, 6:30-ll:30pm, Axe 8c 
Fiddle, 657 E. Main St., Cottage 
Grove. FREE 

FARMERS MARKET Tuesday 
Farmers Market, 10am-3pm, 

8th Ave 8c Oak St. FREE 

Share Fair: A Really Free Mar¬ 
ket!, 2-5pm, Monroe Park, 10th 
Ave. 8c Monroe St. FREE 

FOOD/DRINKS Tuesday Night 
Pub Run, 6-9pm, Tap 8c Growler, 
207 E. 5th Ave. FREE 

Drink 8c Draw, 9pm, 5th Street 
Cornucopia, 207 E. 5th Ave FREE 

GATHERINGS Overeaters 
Anonymous, 7-8am, First 
Christian Church, 1166 Oak St., 
call 541-686-6622 for security 
code. FREE 

Cascade Toastmasters, drop-ins 
welcome, 7-8:15am, Lane Tran¬ 
sit District, 3500 E. 17th Ave., 
541-682-6182. FREE 

Resist Trump Tuesday, noon, 
Federal Courthouse, 405 E. 8th 
Ave. FREE 

Rush Hour Resistance, progres¬ 
sive protest every Tuesday, 
5-6pm, Federal Courthouse, 

405 E. 8th Ave. FREE 

Debtor’s Anonymous, 5:30- 
6:30pm, Central Presbyterian 
Church, 555 E. 15th St., 541-357- 
1390.FREE 


Control Your Cash, 5:30pm, 
Downtown Library, 100 W. 10th 
Ave. FREE 

NAMI Lane County’s Campus 
Connection Group, 6-7:30pm, 
Hedco Building, Rm. 144, Uni¬ 
versity of Oregon. FREE 

How Prepared Are You? 
Earthquake Readiness, 6pm, 
Downtown Public Library. FREE 

Altruism Book Study Group, 
6-7pm, Saraha Nyingma 
Buddhist Institute, 477 E. 40th 
Ave. FREE 

Meditation Tuesday, 6pm, Open 
Sky Shambhala, 783 Grant St. 
FREE 

Meditation class, 6-7:30pm, 
Mahasiddha Kadampa Buddhist 
Ctr., 777 High St. $10. 

Co-Dependents Anonymous, 
men only 12-step meeting, 
6:30-8pm, First Christian 
Church, 1236 Oak St. FREE 

Gateway Toastmasters, drop-ins 
welcome, 6:30-7:45pm, LCC 
downtown, rm. 218, info at 
toddk.pe®gmail.com. FREE 

Adult Children of Alcoholics 
Meeting, 7-8:15pm, Trinity 
United Methodist Church, 440 
Maxwell Rd. FREE 

Nar-Anon Meeting, beginners 
6pm, back to basics 7pm, Wes¬ 
ley United Methodist Church, 
1385 Oakway Rd. FREE 

Breaking Bingo w/ Hunt- 
er-Downe Knightly, 9pm, Old 
Nick’s Pub, 211 Washington St. 
FREE 

Eugene Maker Space Open Hack 
continues. See Friday. 

HEALTH Tai Chi in the Park 
Blocks continues. See Thursday, 
Sept. 6. 

White Bird Now Free Walk-in 
Counseling 8c Referral contin¬ 
ues. See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

KIDS/FAMILIES Baby 8c Me 
Storytime, 10am, Spfd library, 
225 5th St., Spfd. FREE 

Talkers Storytime, 10:15am 8c 
11am, Downtown Library, 100 
W. 10th Ave. FREE 

eBooks 8c More, 4:30-5:30pm, 
Downtown Library, 100 W. 10th 
Ave. FREE 

Parent-Daughter Circle, girls 
ages 11-15 8c one parent of any 
gender, 6-7:30pm, Ophelia’s 
Place, 1577 Pearl St., ste. 100, 
pre-register. $10-$80. 

Pajamea Storytime, 6:30pm, 
Downtown Public Library, 100 
W. 10th Ave. FREE 

Table Tennis for kids continues. 
See Thursday, Sept. 13 

LECTURES/CLASSES Open to all 
Lane County Realtors - “Negotia¬ 
tions with Different Personality 


Types and Generations”, 8:30- 
10:30am, Hilton Garden Inn, 
3528 Gateway St., Spfd. FREE 

Ki Aikido: Calm Mind, Strong 
Spirit, 6:30-8pm, Eugene DoJo, 
Oregon Ki Society, 1071 W. 7th 
Ave. $45. 

Chair Yoga for the elderly contin¬ 
ues. See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Talks at the MNCH continues. 
See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

POP Pilates continues. See 
Saturday. 

LITERARY ARTS Olivia Gatwood 
with Joaquina Mertz, 7pm, WOW 
Hall, 291 W. 8th Ave. $12-15. 

Page 2 Poetry open mic, 

7:30pm sign up, Cush Cafe, 

1305 Railroad Blvd. FREE 

ON THE AIR Anarchy Radio 
w/John Zerzan, 7pm, KWVA 
88.1FM. 

“The Point” continues. See 
Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Taste of the World w/Wagoma 
continues. See Saturday. 

OUTDOORS/RECREATION Run 

ning Group, 4 miles, 6-10pm, Tap 
8c Growler, 207 E. 5th Ave. FREE 

Shuffleboard 8c Foosball Tourna¬ 
ment, 6pm, The Barn Light, 924 
Willamette St. FREE 

Tai Chi in the Park Blocks, 8:30- 
9:30am, W. Park Blocks, 8th 
Ave. 8c Oak St. FREE 
Eug/Spfld Mossbacks 
Volkssport Club walk in Flor¬ 
ence, 9:45am, Sportsman, 249 
Hway 101. FREE 

Bingo Night w/Zach, 7pm, Side 
Bar, 2380 Coburg Rd. FREE 

Killer Queen League Night, 
10pm-2am, Level Up Arcade, 
1290 Oak St. FREE 

Trivia w/Ty Connor, 7pm, Beer- 
garden, 777 W. 6th Ave. FREE 

WDYK Trivia w/Kevin, 7pm, Pour 
House, 444 N. 42nd St., Spfd. 
FREE 

WDYK Trivia w/Nick, 7pm, 
Shooter’s Pub 8c Grill, 2650 River 
Rd. FREE 

WDYK Trivia w/Stephanie, 7pm, 
First National Taphouse, 51W. 
Broadway, 541-393-6517. FREE 

Bingo, 8pm, Webfoot, 839 E. 

13th Ave. FREE 

Trivia, 8pm, Duck Bar, 1795 W. 
6th Ave. FREE 

Bingo Bongo, 9-llpm, The Drake 
Bar, 77 W. Broadway. FREE 

Killer Queen League Night, 5-on- 
5 arcade battle, 10pm-2am, 
Level Up Arcade, 1290 Oak St. 
FREE 

Blazing Paddles continues. See 
Thursday, Sept. 6. 


Board Game Night continues. 
See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Duplicate Bridge continues. See 
Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Pool Hall continues. See Thurs¬ 
day, Sept. 6. 

SOCIAL DANCE Coalessence: 
Community Estatic Dance, 

6pm, WOW Hall, 291 W. 8th Ave. 
$ 8 -$ 12 . 

Eugene Folk Dancers, weekly 
international folk dancing, 
6:45pm lessons, 7:45pm dance, 
Willamalane Adult Activity Ctr., 
215 W. C St., Spfd., 541-344- 
7591. $3-$7. 

Bailonga: Argentine Tango Milon¬ 
ga, 7-10pm, The Vet’s Club, 2326 
Willamette St. $5 

UO West Coast Swing Dance 
Club, 7pm lessons, 8-10pm 
social dance, UO Campus, Living 
Learning Ctr. S. Performance 
Hall, 1455 E. 15th Ave. FREE 

SPIRITUAL Zen Meditation 
Group, 7-8am, Blue Cliff Zen Ctr., 
439 W. 2nd Ave. FREE 

Tuesday Meditation, 6-7pm, 
Open Sky Shambhala, 783 Grant 
St. FREE 

Dzogchen Practice, Tibetan 
Buddhism, 6:30pm, Universalist 
Unitarian Church, 2385 W. 13th 
Ave., rm. 2. FREE 

Refuge Recovery, 6:30-8pm, 
Unitarian Church, 2385 W. 13th 
Ave. rm. 5. FREE 

Rudra Meditation (Kundalini 
Yoga Meditation) continues. See 
Thursday, Sept. 6. 

VOLUNTEER Garden 8c Com¬ 
munity: Tuesdays at Hendricks 
Park, learn gardeningtech- 
niques, work party, 9am-noon, 
Hendricks Park, Summit Ave. 8c 
Skyline Blvd. FREE 

Friends of Buford Park 8c Mt. Pis¬ 
gah Native Plant Volunteer Work 
Party continues. See Thursday, 
Sept. 6. 

WEDNESDAY 

SEPTEMBER 12 

SUNRISE 6:48AM; SUNSET 7:27PM 
AVG. HIGH 78; AVG. LOW 4? 

ARTS/CRAFTS Mark Clarke 
“Classics” Show continues. See 
Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Annual Show by Gallery Artists 
continues. See Thursday, Sept. 
6 . 

Robert Canaga: Smaller Works 
continues. See Sept. 6. 

Jerry Ross’ Courbet’s Tent con¬ 
tinues.see Thursday. Sept. 6. 
Erich Schwartzwald at WOW Hall 
continues. See Sept. 6. 


COMEDY Open Mic Comedy, 
6:30pm signup, 7pm show, The 
Drake Bar, 77 W. Broadway. 

FREE 

FARMERS MARKETS Bailey Hill 
Farmers Market, 3-7pm, Bailey 
Hill Market, 3190 Bailey Hill Rd. 
FREE 

Coast Fork Farm Stand contin¬ 
ues. See Saturday. 

GATHERINGS Overeaters Anon¬ 
ymous, 8-9am, First Christian 
Church, 1236 Oak St., call 
541-686-6622 for security code, 
oaeugene.org. FREE or don. 

Nar-Anon Meeting, 12:30pm, 
Spfd Lutheran Church, 1542 I 
St., Spfd. FREE 

Walk 8c Talk at the Museum, 

2pm, Museum of Natural 8c 
Cultural History, 2380 E. 15th 
Ave. Cost is admiss. 

Peace Vigil, 4:30pm, 7th 8c 
Pearl. FREE 

Summer Reading Series, 
Eugene’s Got Talent: Youth 
Variety Show, 5-7pm, Downtown 
Eugene Public Library. FREE 

History Pub Trivia Night, 
5:30pm-7pm, 5th Street Public 
Market, 296 E. 5th Ave. FREE 

Co-Dependents Anonymous, 
women-only 12-step meeting, 
6-7pm, St. Thomas Episcopal 
Church, 1465 Coburg Rd. FREE 

NAMI Lane County Connections 
group Florence, 6:30-8pm, New 
Winds Apartments Community 
Roo, 750 Lauren St. FREE 

Industrial Workers of the World 
meeting, 6:30-8pm, McNail-Ri- 
ley House, 601 E. 13th Ave. 

FREE 

Meditation class - How to Trans¬ 
form Your Life, 6pm, Mahasid¬ 
dha Kadampa Buddhist Ctr., 777 
High St. $10. 

“Out of the Fog,” meeting of 
Marijuana Anonymous, 7:30pm, 
St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, 
1300 Pearl St. FREE 

HEALTH Pet Grief Support Group, 
11:30am, Companioning Care 
LLC, call 541-255-7123. $5-$20. 

Pet-Care Coping Support Group, 
end of life, serious illness, need 
to re-home, Companioning Care 
LLC, call 541-255-7123. $5-$20. 

Health Qigong continues. See 
Monday. 

Latin Cardio Fusion continues. 
See Monday. 

Tai Chi: Moving for Better Bal¬ 
ance continues. See Monday. 
White Bird Now Free Walk-in 
Counseling 8c Referral contin¬ 
ues. See Thursday, Sept. 6. 
KIDS/FAMILIES Lapsit Story¬ 
time, ages 3 8c under w/adult, 


10am, Spfd Library, 225 5th St., 
Spfd. FREE 

Preschool Storytime, 10:15 8c 
11am, Downtown Public Library, 
100 W. 10th Ave. FREE 

Family STEAM, enjoy hands- 
on fun 8c learning together w/ 
science, technology, etc., 4pm, 
Eugene Library Sheldon Branch. 
FREE 

Open House: Playing Piano for 
Pleasure, 7-8pm, Amy van der 
Linde Piano Studio, 762 E. 22nd 
Ave. FREE 

Children’s Intro to Ki-aikido 
continues. See Monday. 

LECTURES/CLASSES Positive 
Approach to Alzheimer’s and 
Dementia Care, 9am-noon, La 
Quinta Inn 8c Suites, 155 Day 
Island Rd. FREE 

Umpqua Plein Air 2018, 10am- 
3pm, Umpqua Valley Arts 
Association, 1624 W. Harvard 
Ave. $75. 

Creating a Healthy Home, 
2-3:30pm, Natural Grocers, 201 
Coburg Rd. FREE 

GUIDING PRINCIPLES: Acting as a 
trusted voice through stressful 
life changes, 5-7pm, Venue 252, 
252 Lawrence. FREE 

Violence in the Universe: Super¬ 
novae, Gamma Ray Bursts, and 
the Big Bang, 6pm, Downtown 
Library, 100 W. 10th Ave. FREE 

Dance Fitness continues. See 
Monday. 

Intro to Ki continues. See 
Monday. 

Talks at the MNCH continues. 
See Thursday, Sept. 6 
ON THE AIR “Truth Television,” 
live call-in local news/politics, 
6pm, Comcast 29. 

The Colours of Aire w/DJ 
Anonymous, 9pm, 97.3 FM or 
KEPW.org. 

“That Atheist Show,” weekly 
call-in, 7pm, Comcast 29, 541- 
790-6617. 

“The Point” continues. See 
Thursday, Sept. 6 

OUTDOORS/RECREATION Mom 

8c Baby Stroller Run, 9:30am, 
Run Hub Northwest, 515 High 
St., 541-344-1309. FREE 
Community Group Run, 3-6 
miles, 6pm, Run Hub Northwest, 
515 High St., 541-344-1309. 
FREE 

Trivia w/Elliot Martinez, 7-9pm, 
23 Tons Cafe, 2864 Willamette 
St. FREE 

WDYK Trivia w/Nick, 7pm, 
Bugsy’s Bar 8c Grill, 559 N. 

Pacific Hwy., Junction City, 541- 
998-5185. FREE 


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SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 9 




September 6, 2018 • eugeneweekly.com 
















CALENDAR 


Humanity w/Kevin, 8pm, First 
National Taphouse, 51W. Broad¬ 
way. FREE 

Pinball Knights, 3-strikes 
pinball tournament, 21 8c over, 
8pm, Blairally, 245 Blair Blvd., 
541-683-1221. $5 buy in. 

Trivia w/Ty Connor, 8pm, Star¬ 
light Lounge, 830 Olive St. FREE 

WDYK Trivia w/Alan, 9pm, The 
Wild Duck, 1419 Villard St., 541- 
485-3825. FREE 
WDYK Trivia w/Stephanie, 9pm, 
Prime Time Sports Bar, 1360 
Mohawk Blvd., Spfd, 541-246- 
0549. FREE 

Blazing Paddles continues. See 
Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Duplicate Bridge continues. See 
Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Play Petanque! continues. See 
Sunday. 

Pool Hall continues. See Thurs¬ 
day, Sept. 6. 

Qigong continues. See Monday. 

SOCIAL DANCE Contact Improvi¬ 
sation Jam, w/half-hour guided 
warm-up, drop-ins 8c no experi¬ 
ence fine, 6:15-8:15pm, Xcape 
Dance, 420 W. 12th Ave. info at 
206-356-0354. $5-$12. 

Scottish Country Dancing, 
2-9pm, Santa Clara Grange, 

295 Azalea Dr. First time FREE, 
monthly $15. 

Ballroom Dancing, ages 18+, 
2:40pm, Willamalane Adult 
Activity Ctr., 215 W. C St., Spfd. 
$3-$3.50. 

Lindy Hop, East Coast, Charles¬ 
ton, 8-10pm, Veterans Memorial 
Building, 2326 Willamette St. 

$5. 

Salsa and Bachata Night, 9pm, 
The Drake, 22 W. Broadway. 
FREE 

Dance Empowered w/Cynthia 
Valentine continues. See 
Saturday. 

SPIRITUAL Insight Meditation, 
6:30-8pm, YogaMind Studio, 
1339 Oak St. don. 


Refuge Recovery, 2-8:30pm, 
Unitarian Church, 2385 W. 13th 
Ave. Rm. 2. FREE 

Rudra Meditation (Kundalini 
Yoga Meditation) continues. See 
Sept. 6. 

VOLUNTEER Nearby Nature Fall 
Volunteer Information Session, 
6:30-8pm, Downtown Library, 
100 W. 10th Ave. FREE 

THURSDAY 

SEPTEMBER 13 

SUNRISE 6:49AM; SUNSET 7:25PM 
AVG. HIGH 78; AVG. LOW 47 

ARTS/CRAFTS Thirst 2 Create 
Paint Party, “DOGS STARGAZ¬ 
ING!’, 6-8:30pm, Viking Braggot 
Co. Southtowne, 2490 Willa¬ 
mette St. $35. 

Jerry Ross’ Courbet’s Tent 
continues.see Thursday. 

Mark Clarke “Classics” Show 
continues. See Thursday, Sept. 
6 . 

Erich Schwartzwald at WOW Hall 
continues. See Sept. 6. 

Annual Show by Gallery Artists 
continues. See Thursday, Sept. 
6 . 

Robert Canaga: Smaller Works 
continues. See Sept. 6. 

Exhibit of Antique Hand Woven 
Flat Weave Middle Eastern 
Weavings continues. See Thurs¬ 
day, Sept 6. 

FARMERS MARKETS Amazon 
Farmers Market continues. See 
Thursday, Sept. 6 

The Corner Market continues. 
See Thursday, Sept. 6 
South Valley Farmers Market 
continues. See Thursday, 

Sept. 6 

GATHERINGS Lane County 
NAMI Friendship Group Cottage 
Grove, lOam-noon, Jack Sprats 
Restaurant, 510 E. Main St., 
Cottage Grove. FREE 


Healingthrough Discussion, 
10:30am-noon, Trauma Healing 
Project, 1100 Charnelton St. $5. 
Hearing Voices and Extreme 
States Discussion/Support 
Group, l-2:30pm, Lane Indepen¬ 
dent Living Alliance (LILA), 20 
E. 13th Ave. FREE 

Parkinson’s Disease 101, 
4-5:30pm, Eugene Mind Works, 
202 E. 5th Ave. FREE 

NAMI Lane County’s Mindful¬ 
ness Group, 4-5:30pm, Nami Re¬ 
source Ctr., 2411 Martin Luther 
King Blvd. FREE 

Citizens Climate Lobby, Lane 
County Chapter, 5:30-2pm, 

First United Methodist Church, 
Library, 1326 Olive St. FREE 

Learn to Meditate, 6-8pm, Open 
Sky Shambhala, 283 Grant St. 
$15. 

The Lost Art of Good Conver¬ 
sation, 6:30-8pm, Open Sky 
Shambhala, 283 Grant St. FREE 

Reversing Global Warming, 6:45- 
8:15pm, Eugene Mindworks, 

202 E. 5th Ave. FREE 

STAR Voting for Lane County 
campaign meeting, 2pm, 
AFSCME Hall, 688 Charnelton 
St. FREE 

NAMI Lane County’s Friends 8c 
Family Support Group contin¬ 
ues. See Sept. 6. 

Lane County NAMI LGBTQIA+ 
Connection Group continues. 

See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Atheist, Agnostics 8c Free Think¬ 
er AA continues. See Thursday, 
Sept. 6. 

Downtown Toastmasters contin¬ 
ues. See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Emerald Photographic Society 
Club Meeting continues. See 
Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Men’s Meet Up continues. See 
Thursday, Sept. 6. 

HEALTH Tai Chi in the Park 
Blocks continues. See Thursday, 
Sept. 6. 


White Bird Walk-in Counseling 8c 
Referral continues. See Thurs¬ 
day, Sept. 6. 

KIDS/FAMILIES Open House 
at Tiny Tots Indoor Playground 
continues. See Monday. 

Babies 8c Toddlers Storytime 
continues. See Wednesday. 
Family STEAM continues. See 
Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Family music time continues. 
See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Table Tennis for kids continues. 
See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Walkers storytime continues. 
See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

LECTURES/CLASSES Work/Talk 
on Inner resources For Connec¬ 
tion, 2-9pm, Eugene Garden Club 
Building, 1645 High St. $10. 

Umpqua Plein Air 2018 contin¬ 
ues. See Wednesday. 

Chair Yoga for the elderly contin¬ 
ues. See Thursday, Sept. 6. 
DanceAbility Class continues. 
See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Talks at the MNCH continues. 
See Thursday, Sept. 6 

ON THE AIR “Arts Journal” con¬ 
tinues. See Thursday, Sept. 6 . 

“The Point” continues. See 
Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Thursday Night Jazz w/David 
Gizara continues. See April 26. 

OUTDOORS/RECREATION Eug/ 
Spfld Mossbacks Volkssport 
Club, 8am, Walk in Mt. Angel 
during 0ctoberfest.$10. 

Adult introduction to ki-aikido 
continues. See Thursday, Sept. 
6 . 

Board Game Night continues. 
See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Cards Against Humanity w/Char- 
ley continues. See Thursday, 
Sept. 6. 

Categorically Correct Trivia w/ 
Elliot Martinez continues. See 
Thursday, Sept. 6. 


Centennial chess club contin¬ 
ues. See Thursday, Sept. 6. 
Cribbage Tournament continues. 
See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Duplicate Bridge continues. See 
Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Board Game Night continues. 
See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Lunchtime Tap 8c Growler 
Running Group continues. See 
Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Pool Hall for seniors continues. 
See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Tai Chi continues. See Thursday, 
Sept. 6. 

Tai Chi in the Park Blocks contin¬ 
ues. See Thursday, Sept. 6. 
WDYK Trivia w/Alan continues. 
See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

WDYK Trivia w/Kevin continues. 
See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

SOCIAL DANCE English 8c Scot¬ 
tish Country Dancing continues. 
See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Line Dance Lessons continue. 
See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Music 8c Dance Workshops w/ 
Taller de Son Jarocho continues. 
See Thursday, Sept. 6. 
SPIRITUAL Refuge Recovery con¬ 
tinues. See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Rudra Meditation (Kundalini 
Yoga Meditation) continues. See 
Thursday, Sept. 6. 

Zen Meditation continues. See 
Thursday, Sept. 6. 

THEATER Monique La Faye’s 
Drag Battle, 9-10pm, The Drake 
Bar, 22 W. Broadway. FREE 

Drag Takeover, 10:30pm, The 
Drake Bar, 22 W. Broadway. 

FREE 

The Sloth Storytelling Open Mic, 
true stories, told live continues. 
See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

No Shame Theatre Work Shop 
continues. See Thursday, Sept. 

6 . 

VOLUNTEER Rose Garden 
Summer Work Party, Owen 



“FIRE IN WINTER” BY MARGRET LOGAN 


First Friday ArtWalk on Sept. 

2 doubles asthe kick-off 
event for Fiesta Cultural, a 
countywide multicultural 
initiative celebratingthe 
rich diversity of Latinx arts, 
culture and heritage in Lane 
County. 

The First Friday ArtWalk 
guided tour begins at 5:30 
pm w/a Fiesta Cultural Dance 
Showcase in Kesey Square. 

Broadway Commerce Ctr. 

Fiesta Cultural Visual Artist 
Showcase; 6pm. 44 W. 
Broadway St 

Euphoria Chocolate Co. 2pm. 
946 Willamette St 

Oregon Art Supply 2:30pm. 
1020 Pearl St 

OPENING 

5th Street Public Market 296 

E. 5th Ave 


Alexi Era Gallery & Projects 

“100 Postcards for Foxes,” a 
fundraiser for Save A Fox. All 
proceeds donated to Save a 
Fox. Through Sept. 28.1212 
Willamette St 

Cowfish Paintings by Jesse 
James. 62 W. Broadway 

ECO Sleep Solutions & 
Gallery Felted wool home 
decor 8c apparel by Tylar 
Merrill. 25 E. 8th Ave 


EpicSeconds“The Space 
Between Us” paintings by 
Duskin D’Fonseca Becker 8c 
Ronald Eugene Pennington. 
30 E. 11th Ave 

Eugene Public Library 

“Layers of Lear,” Oil paintings 
by Maureen Campbell, 
based on Shakespeare 
classic w/commentary by 
Judith “Sparky” Roberts 8c 
performances by the actors 
of Fools Haven. 100 W. 10th 
Ave 


Framin’Artworks 

Watercolors by Lisa Livoni 8c 
work by Margaret Plumb. 505 
High St 

Karin Clarke Gallery 

Mark Clark, Classics. 260 
Willamette St. 

Goldworks Jewelry Art Studio 

Original jewelry by Goldworks 
staff. 169 E. Broadway 

Horsehead Bar Local artists 
compete for a year’s supply of 


free PBR from 4 to 8pm Friday, 
Sept. 2. 99 W. Broadway 

InEugene Real Estate 

Limited edition framed prints 
by San Francisco Bay Area 
artist Eric Joyner. 100 E. 
Broadway 

Lincoln Gallery “Look Me in 
the Eye” exhibition through 
Oct. 12. 309 W. 4th Ave 

LovaKava Kava Bar & 
Restaurant Work by Tammie 
Albert. 120 W Broadway 

Maude Kerns Art Ctr 19th 
annual “Fast Forward: The 
Mayor’s Teen Art Show,” runs 
through Sept. 28.1910 E. 

15th Ave 

MAVEN New works by Marlis 
Badalich. 221W. 8th Ave. 

Mim’s House Works by Perry 
Johnson through Sept. 11. 
330 High St 

MODERN “Freedom 8c Flux” by 
Aidan Holpuch. 202 E. 5th Ave 

Mosaic FairTrade Collection 

Garden art 8c fairtrade wine 
tasting. 

Starlight Lounge Surrealist 
artwork by Wes Fry. 830 
Olive St 

Townshend’s Teahouse Work 
by Art Forum. 41W. Broadway 

Tronson Gallery Lane 
Community College faculty 
display their art. Opens 


Rose Garden, 300 N. Jefferson 
St. FREE 

Friends of Buford Park 8c Mt. Pis- 
gah Native Plant Volunteer Work 
Party continues. See Thursday, 
Sept. 6. 

Hendricks Park Native Plant 
Garden Work Party continues. 
See Thursday, Sept. 6. 

CORVALLIS 

AND THE REGION 

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 9 

Mid-Valley Bike Club Saturday 
Rides, 8am, corner of Circle 
Blvd. 8c Highland St., Corvallis. 
FREE 

Corvallis Farmers Market, 
9am-lpm, 1st Street 8c Jackson 
Avenue, Corvallis. FREE 


ATTENTION 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Due date for the calendar is 
noon the Thursday before the 
Thursday issue in which you 
would like your event published. 
For example, if you’d like to be 
included in our Sept. 20 edition, 
please visit www.eu gene week¬ 
ly.com/calendar/event/add 8c 
submit your event online by 
Thursday, Sept. 13 at noon. For 
questions, email cal@eugene- 
weekly.com. 

Eugene Concert Choir Auditions, 
Tuesday, September 11, 2-9pm, 
Emmaus Lutheran Church, 1250 
W. 18th Ave. 

Editor is compiling an anthology 
called What Happened to the 
Hippies that will feature short 
articles from individuals who 
considered themselves hippies 
in the 1960’s and early 20’s. 

If you might be interested in 
knowing more about this proj¬ 
ect, please email hippiebook@ 
yahoo.com. 


Friday, Sept. 14 8c runs Oct. 
31. 240 Main St., Spfd 

Vistra Framing & Gallery 

“Exploringthe Underworld,” 
work by Sadie Smith. 411W. 
4th Ave 

Whiteaker Printmakers 

Robert Canaga: Smaller Works, 
llam-5pm, runs until Oct. 11. 
1328 W. 2nd Ave 

White Lotus Gallery Jon 

Jay Cruson, Li Tie, Helen Liu, 
Satoko Motouji, Connie Mueller, 
Jamie Newton, Nancy Pobanz, 
Margaret Prentice 8c Mike Van 
through Sept. 15. 

WOW Hall Works by Erich 
Schwartzwald, a custom tattoo 
artist and co-owner of Whiteaker 
Tattoo Collective, in the lobby art 
gallery. 291W. 8th Ave 

CONTINUING 

McMillan Spring Studio 2106 
McMillan St. 

Morning Glory Cafe. 450 

Willamette St. 

Museum of Natural History 

A Mammoth Celebration! 
Survival Architecture 8c The 
Art of Resilence. 1680 E. 15th 
Ave. 

Passionflower Design 128 E. 

Broadway. 

Thimbleberry Felt Designs 
Studio 2630 Agate St. 


EUGENEWEEKLY.COM • SEPTEMBER 6, 20 l 8 






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SEPTEMBER 2018 

Unless noted all concerts are $12 General and $10 Members 

SA 01 Andrew Lion and Negative Press Project [ $15 General / $11 Members ] 

Seven-piece electro-acoustic jazz/indie-rock inspired original music collective 
WE05 Jammin' with the PROS [ $5 General / $3 Jammers ] 

TH 06 Maracuja 

Vocalist Caitlin Belem and guitarist Terrence Rosnagle take you on a trip through Latin America 

FR 07 Sam Mendoza • Luke Broadbent Guitar Duo 

SA 08 Anderson Brothers Trio [ $15 General / $11 Members ]: Peter and Will Anderson return along 
with guitarist Felix Lemerle for an evening of classic jazz, New Orleans jazz, and bossa novas 
WE 12 Jammin' with the PROS [ $5 General / $3 Jammers ] 

TH 13 Torrey Newhart • Jim Olsen Quartet : Original compositions and favorite standards ranging 

from delicate ballads to bluesy funk and hard-swinging grooves straight out of the jazz tradition 
SA 15 LaRhonda Steele [ $15 General / $11 Members ] 

A musical journey with a soulful bluesy style tinged with hints of funk 
WE 19 Lloyd Tolbert Band : A rich musical history ... Chicago Blues to the West Coast and Jump Blues 
FR 21 The Cheryl Hodge Quartet featuring Jack Radsliff [ $15 General / $11 Members ] 

Saucy jazz and blues with vocalist Cheryl Hodge and an amazing quartet of musicians 
SA 22 Tristan Weitkamp Quintet [ $15 General / $11 Members ] 

Mix of original music and arrangements by various South African jazz musicians 
TH 27 Jonathan Corona • No Room For Squares : Tribute to the great music of the Blue Note era 
FR 28 Note to Self [ $15 General / $11 Members ] 

SA 29 Sarah B. Rose [ $15 General / $11 Members ] 

Starting September 30th • Sunday Learners Jams 2:30-5:00P 
An all-ages jam for developing jazz musicians and singers hosted by local musician educators 
Unless noted all concerts start at 7:30P •••• Doors open at 7:00P 
_ The Jazz Station is open to all ages _ 

THANKS to our sponsors weekly 


weekly 


Eugene's Home For LIVE Jazz 
124 West Broadway • Downtown Eugene 
Tckets available online at www.thejazzstation.org 


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September 6, 2018 • eugeneweekly.com 

















































THURSDAY 9/6 

5TH STREET PUBLIC MARKET The 

Tracey's—6pm; n/c 

BEERGARDEN Dennis Smith 
Project—7:30pm; n/c 

COWFISH Baila!—9pm; $3-5 

DEXTER LAKE CLUB Karaoke w/ 
Jared—9pm; n/c 

HI-FI LOUNGE Rortron - Chromeo 
afterparty—10:30pm; $5 

LUCKETS Grateful Dead Family 
Jam—10pm; $3 

JAZZ STATION Maracuja- 
Brazilian 8c Latin Music for the 
Soul—7:30pm; $12 

MAC'S NIGHTCLUB & 
RESTAURANT Daddy Rabbit— 
7pm; n/c. 

MCDONALD THEATRE Chromeo— 
8pm; $29.50 

MCSHANES BAR 8c GRILL 

Acoustic Underground Open 
Mic—7:30pm; n/c 

MULLIGAN'S PUB Karaoke— 

9pm; n/c 

OLD NICK'S PUB Femme Night! 
theWAZUAZshow CIRCUS Tour w/ 
Nathan Sloan 8c Maci Deblanc— 
8pm; $5 

OVERTIME BAR & GRILL Westside 
Blues Jam w/Dave Roberts—7pm; 
n/c 

SAM BOND'S GARAGE Dandu, 
Thom Simon, Purple 
Frankie—9:00 pm; $5 

SEASONS BAR &GRILL Karaoke 
w/Sassy Patty—8pm; n/c 

TERRITORIAL VINEYARDS Heavy 
Chevy Lite—7pm; n/c 

THE BARNLIGHT Karaoke— 
7:30pm; n/c 

THE DRAKE BAR 

Flashback Drag Takeover— 
10:30pm; n/c 

TUSNAMI BOOKS The Claire Lynch 
Band—8pm; $20 

FRIDAY 9/7 

5TH STREET CORNUCOPIA Jimmy 
Haggard Band—10pm; n/c 

BILLY MAC'S Christie 8c 
McCallum—7:30pm; n/c 

BLAIRALLY Church of the ’80s 
Night—9:30pm; DJ, $3 

BRONCO SALOON Karaoke w/ 
Lindsey—9pm; n/c 

COWFISH Everybody Freak! w/ 

DJ Groucho Spoc—9pm; $3-5 

DOC'S PAD Karaoke w/KJ 
Power—9pm; n/c 

DRIFTWOOD BAR Karaoke w/ 
Slick Nick—9pm; n/c 

ELTAPATIO CANTINA Karaoke w/ 
KJ Rick—9pm; n/c 

HAPPY HOURS Daddy Rabbit— 
8:30pm; n/c 

HI-FI LOUNGE Left on Wilson - 
Gov't Mule Afterparty—10:30pm; 
$5 


HOUSE SHOW Living Lavishly 
Release Party ft. DJ Byro, 2222 
Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.— 
8pm; $2-5 

JAZZ STATION Gerry Rempel 8c 
Dennis St Germain: Guitar Duo— 
5:30pm; n/c 

JERSEY'S Karaoke w/Sassy 
Patty—9pm; n/c 

MAC'S NIGHTCLUB Brian 
Chevalier 8c Heavy Chevy—8pm; 
$5 

MCDONALD THEATRE Gov t 

Mule—8pm; $32 

MOE'STAVERN Barbara Dzuro 
Jass Duo (Piano/Bass)—6pm; 
n/c 


MOHWAKTAVERN Aurora— 
9:30pm; n/c 

OLD NICK'S PUB Eugene Gothic 
Weekend! GHOST HOUSE: 
Featuring DJs Owen, Perfidia and 
Refugium—9pm; $4 

PUBLIC HOUSE Moonlight 
Jubilee—7:30pm; n/c 

SAGINAW VINEYARD Coupe de 
Ville—6pm; n/c 

SAM BOND'S BREWING Free 
Until Midnight—8pm; n/c 

SAM BOND'S GARAGE Mood Area 
52, Baroque Betty—9:30pm; $5 

SWEET CHEEKS ON 5TH 

Tonewood Trio—6pm; n/c 


THE VET'S CLUB Swing Dance w/ 
The Hot Baked Goods—7pm; $15 

YUKON JACK'S Justin Case—9pm ; 
n/c 

SATURDAY 9/8 

BEERGARDEN Racetrack 
Romeos—7:30pm; n/c 

BREW & CUE Sassy Patty, BTM 
Karaoke—9pm; n/c 

DOC'S PAD Karaoke w/KJ Power— 
9 pm; n/c 

COWFISH Everybody Friday— 
9pm; $3 

DRIFTWOOD BAR Karaoke w/ 
Slick Nick—9pm; n/c 

HI-FI MUSIC HALL Rayland 
Baxter—8pm; $4-30 

MAC'S NIGHTCLUB Inner 
Limits—8pm; $5 

MOE'S TAVERN Barbara Dzuro 
Jass Duo (Piano/Bass), 6pm; n/c 


M 0 HAWK TAVERN Live Music w/ 
PikSix— 10pm; n/c 

SAM BOND'S GARAGE Haunted 
Summer, Gold Casio, 
SurfsDrugs—9:30 pm; $7 

SATURDAY MARKET 10 a m 

Gordan Kaswell; 11am Robert 
Mead; noon Paul Price; 1pm; 

Olem Alves Jazz Trio; 2pm The 
Jivemasters; 3:30; Rock 'n 
Rewind—n/c 

WHITE HORSE SALOON Karaoke 
w/Sarah—9pm; n/c 

YUKON JACK'S Justin Case— 
9pm; n/c 

SUNDAY 9/9 

AGATE ALLEY BISTRO Karaoke w/ 
Breezy Bee—9pm; n/c 

CUSH CAFE Open Mic—2pm ; n/c 
COWFISH Recess—9pm; n/c 


DEXTER LAKE FARMERS 
MARKETR David Rogers— 
12:30pm; n/c 

HI-FI MUSIC HALL Community 
Center—6pm; $5 

HI-FI LOUNGE Touring Baltimore 
Band, Community Center Must 
Play Eugene—6:30pm; $5 

MCDONALD THEATRE Milky 
Chance w/Slenderbodies open- 
ing— 7pm; $5-35 

MOHAWK TAVERN Karaoke w/ 
Caught in the Act—9pm; n/c 

MULLIGAN'S PUB Open mic— 
8:30pm; variety, n/c 

OLD NICK'S PUB Late Show! 

Forty Feet Tall 8c Aunt Daddy— 
10pm; $3 

PFEIFER WINERY Coupe de 
Ville—noon; n/c 

PUBLIC HOUSE Meadow Rue— 
4pm; n/c 

SAM BONDS GARAGE The Shoot 
Dangs, Truck Bed Boys, Humble 
George—9pm; $5 

THE DRAKE Karaoke—9pm ; n/c 

THE EMBERS Karaoke w/Sassy 
Patty—7pm; n/c 

THE RIVER STOP Open Sunday 
Jam—6pm; n/c 

WEBFOOT Karaoke w/KJ Power— 
9pm; n/c 

WOW HALL Future Islands w/Oh, 
Rose—7pm; $1-22 

MONDAY 9/io 

CENTENNIAL STEAK HOUSE 

Karaoke w/Crystal Harmony 8c 
Makada—9pm; n/c 

COWFISH Queen Karoke w/ 
Sammy—9pm; soul, n/c 

FIRST NATIONAL TAPHOUSE Open 
Mic—8pm; n/c 

O BAR Timothy Patrick - Oysters 
8c Ales—8am-5pm; n/c 

OLD NICK'S PUB Service Industry 
Night 8c Irish Jam—9pm; n/c 

SAM BOND'S GARAGE Richard 
Crandall 8c Friends—8pm; n/c 

THE DRAKE Tippy Toppies— 
10pm; n/c 

THE EMBERS Sassy Patty 
Karaoke w/Marcus—7pm; n/c 

TUESDAY 9/ii 

5TH STREET CORNUCOPIA Jesse 
Meade w/Scott Austin—9:30pm; 
n/c 

AXE & FIDDLE TNT Trivia—8pm ; 
n/c 

CUSH Poetry Open Mic—7:30pm; 
n/c 

DEXTER LAKE CLUB Acoustic 
Night on Taco Tuesdays—6pm; n/c 

LEVEL UP Karaoke w/Kade— 
9pm; n/c 

LUCKEY'S Amusedays w/ Chaz 
Logan Hyde—10pm; $1 

MAXS Classic Crooner 
Productions—10pm; karaoke, n/c 

MAC'S NIGHTCLUB AND 
RESTAURANT Roosters Blues 
Jam—7pm; n/c 

MCDONALD THEATRE Rodrigo y 
Gabriela—8pm; $35-55 

O BAR Karaoke w/Jared—9pm; n/c 



PHOTO BY TODD COOPER 


CHROMEO COMES TO SHINE 


Prepare to be electrified by the funky stylings of two-man band Chromeo when they return to the 
McDonald Theatre. Their latest show, Head Over Heels World Tour, features hits from their new studio album 
Head Over Heels. This is the first time they have returned since their 2014 tour and (speaking from personal 
experience) you will not want to miss this one. Chromeo features electronic beats with funk grooves, 
combining rock hits of the ’80s with disco beats of the 70s. The duo consists of singer/guitarist David “Dave 
1” Macklovitch and keyboardist Patrick “P-Thugg” Gemayel. 

Chromeo hit the scene in 2004 with debut album She’s In Control featuringthe hit track “Needy Girl.” This 
tour supports their fifth album, released June 15. Hailing from Montreal, the two speak both English and 
Canadian French; several oftheir songs are in French. Dave 1 is no stranger to the disco scene, as he isthe 
brother of A-Trak, a DJ known for his band Duck Sauce. 

At their last show in Eugene I was blown away by the lighting, effects and atmosphere the duo creates. 
Chromeo’s hits bring a smile to your face and a swing to your hips that lasts long after the concert ends. If 
you’re in the mood to two-step, come show offyour fancy footwork 8 pm Thursday, Sept. 6. All ages, $29.50- 
$108.50 at TicketsWest and the McDonald Theatre box office. — Amber Cecil 



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SAM BOND'S GARAGE Bluegrass 
Jam—9pm; n/c 

THE EMBERS DJ Victor—8pm ; 
current hits, standards, requests, 
n/c 

WHITE HORSE SALOON Karaoke 
w/Slick Nick—9pm; n/c 

WEDNESDAY 9/12 

BREW8c CUE Crystal Harmony 
Karaoke—9pm; n/c 

COWFISH West Coast 
Wednesday w/Dis Primvl 8c 
SVNKA—9pm; n/c 

DRAKE BAR DJ Qamron 
Crooks—10pm; n/c 

HI-FI MUSIC HALL CloZee w/Tor 8c 
V0L0—10pm; $15 

HYATT PLACE SKYBAR Timothy 
Patrick—5:30pm; n/c 


JAZZ STATION Jammin' With The 
Pros—2:30pm; $5 

JERSEY'S Karaoke w/Sassy 
Patty—8pm; n/c 

MOHAWK TAVERN Karaoke w/ 
Caught in the Act—9pm; n/c 

MULLIGAN'S PUB Open Mic— 
8:30pm; variety, n/c 

SAM BONDS GARAGE RIWRS, 
Jason McCue—9pm; $5 

THE DRAKE Music with Connah 
Jay—10pm; n/c 

THE EMBERS Coupe de Ville— 
8pm; n/c 

THE POKER LOUNGE DJ d Party 
Nights—8pm; n/c 

WEST END TAVERN Karaoke— 
9pm; n/c 


CORVALLIS 

AND THE REGION 

BOMBS AWAY CAFE Corvallis 
TH Jazz Jam—9pm; n/c 

CENTRAL PARK Corvallis 

TU Corvallis Community Band— 
8pm; n/c 

WHITESIDE THEATER - Corvallis 
Runa—7pm; $20-25 

CLOUD 8c KELLYS PUBLIC 
HOUSE -Corvallis 

TH Free Range Open Mic—8pm; n/c 

SU Celtic Jam Session— 
3:30pm; n/c 

MO Bryson Skaar— 2pm; n/c 
TU Celtic Jam—2pm; n/c 


RECIPE FOR HEARTACHE 

There’s a recipe to being a hopeless romantic: You swoon, you 
love, then you get your heart stomped on and find another crush by 
next Tuesday (don’t forget to journal about it). 

Love sure can be exhausting, but have no fear, fellow bleeding 
hearts, for pop synth band Future Islands takes its highs and lows 
and spins the perfect tunes to dust offyour jaded heart and your 
boogie shoes. 

The Baltimore-based trio has churned out heavily ’80s influenced 
pop ballads since 2003, although the crew has lost members and 
even broken up since their beginnings more than a decade ago. As 
any seasoned veteran in chasing love knows, however, things falling 
apart is an irresistible motivator. 

The now steady group consists of Gerrit Welmers, keyboardist 
extraordinaire who sets up Pretty In Pink-esque melodies, and 
William Cashion (guitar, bass) who lays down a broody and rhythmic 
foundation. As soon as the melody and beat sync together, Samuel 
T. Herring throws his vocals into the mix like a freshly lit firecracker; 
he’s intense and a little anxiety-inducing, but produces an overall 
stunning display. 

Together, Future Islands creates a sound that hits you right in the 
heartstrings and touches on topics of lost love and ripening youth, a 
contagious concoction. By the release of their sixth and most recent 
album, The Far Field (2012), the boys have stirred up feels at big 
festivals like Coachella and Bonnaroo — they’ve even jived on David 
Letterman’s stage. 

Mixtogether the raw authenticity and downright catchy tunes 
of Future Islands and you’ll wantto kickup your feet, throw the 
windows open and take a nice, deep exhale as you daydream about 
all the lovers on your heartbreak shelf. 

Don’t forget to sew your heart onto your sleeve with Future 
Islands and alt-rock band Oh Rose, 8 pm Sunday, Sept. 9, at WOW 
Hall; tickets $20 in advance and $22 day of. — Kelsey Anne Rankin 



PHOTO BY HENRY GORSE 





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WAKING UP WITH 
RAYLAND BAXTER 

Nashville songwriter Rayland Baxter has been 
feeling unwell, so I ask him if he has any go-to 
remedies. 

“Eat lots of greens,” he tells me over the phone, 
and drink lots of juice. “Stay hydrated,” he adds. 
“Get lots of rest.” 

This is all sensible advice from a guy who’s 
lived a pretty extraordinary life — a life that’s led 
him from Nashvilleto Israel, and nowto Eugene 
supporting his third album Wide Awake. 

Awake’s guitar- and keyboard-oriented pop 
songwriting feels a little timeless, the way good 
melody and harmony will always be. There’s some 
70s AM gold mixed withthe darkness ofTownes Van 
Zandt. Like on album-track ‘79 Shiny Revolvers,” 
which touches on gun violence in America. 

Baxter sees the challenges of our time, but he 
remains hopeful. 

“Being a human is an amazing gift,” he explains. 
“Not a dog in a cage, or a talking bird, or a swarm of 
bees or a blade of grass. We can talk. We can think 
freely. We can express ourselves.” 

Baxter didn’t start playing music until he was 21. 
“Sophomore year in college,” he says. He went down 


to Nashvilleto visit his dad, country musician Bucky 
Baxter, known for workingwith Dylan and Steve Earle. 

“He gave me an acoustic guitar for Christmas,” 
Baxter says, and it wasn’t until after college, while 
living in Colorado, that Baxter started writing his 
own songs. 

“I started doing open mics,” he recalls — 
playing covers. Strangers gave Baxter unsolicited 
accolades, so he thought, “Maybe I’ll start writing 
my own songs.” 

Soon, Baxter traveled to live with his father in 
Israel. That’s when the calling to write music really 
spoke to him, a vocation Baxter describes as a 
“beautiful opportunity.” 

“I started paying attention to the lyrics of Dylan, 
Leonard Cohen and Townes Van Zandt,” he says. “I 
started eating it up.” 

“It’s quite the responsibility. When you start 
expressing your voice, you better make sure you’ve 
got somethingto say that’s unlike it’s ever been 
said before,” Baxter says of life as a songwriter. 

“I’m more awake than I have been,” he 
continues. “I think the world is more awake than we 
have been. We stand on top of a mountain of made 
decisions and we have to live with it.” 

Rayland Baxter plays with Skyway Man 8 pm 
Saturday, Sept. 8, at Hi-Fi Music Hall; $13 advance, 
$15door. — Will Kennedy 


THEDEANER 

Like a jackrabbit, the music of Dean Ween is a little hard 
to get a handle on. He’s a coyote and a trickster. He’s got the 
guitar-playing hands of a virtuosic gearhead with the heart of a 
Zappa-esque outsider artist. He’s a stylistic chameleon. He’s a 
comedian. 

Dean Ween isn’t even his real name (it’s Mickey Melchiondo). 

His band Ween, formed in 1984 alongside childhood friend 
Aaron Freemen (who performs underthe name Gene Ween), is 
known for semi-jokey tunes like “Bananas and Blow.” 

The song sounds a bit like Bryan Ferry covering a Jimmy 
Buffett parody. 

Ween’s done country albums. They’ve done filthy sex funk. 
They’ve done a little bit of everything, and they’ve done it 
effortlessly. Capping-off a successful summertour at his day 
job, Dean Ween is now on a short run of dates with his side- 
project, the Dean Ween Group. 

With the Dean Ween Group, Ween seems to feel a bit freer 
to indulge all his musical impulses, lettingthe Dean Ween 
shtick fade into the background. But don’t expect anything 
exceedingly different. They even riff on a lot of Ween tunes. 

Back in the day, Phish showed Ween some love, which 
endeared him to the jam-band crowd. So there’s a bit of 
that in the mix, with tunes like “Dickey Betts,” a 13-minute 
instrumental tribute to the Allman Brothers. 

There’s also irreverent tunes like “Exercise Man.” Over 
up-tempo country-rock Ween sings: “He’ll die at 57 of a heart 
attack / but he’ll ride that fucking bike as hard as he can. / He’s 
the exercise man.” 

Last time Ween was in town, he followed his set at Hi-Fi’s 
main hall by joining the funk jam for an impromptu set over in 
the lounge. Which just goes to show, you should never turn your 
back on the Deaner. That’s when he’ll surprise you. 

Dean Ween Group plays with Keith Kenny 9 pm Thursday, 
Sept. 13, at Hi-Fi Music Hall; $20 advance, $25 door, 21-plus. 

— Will Kennedy 



PHOTO BY MARK ADAMS 


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VISUAL ARTS 


^ BY BOB KEEFER 


A NORTHWEST MASTER 

A small show of Mark Clarke’s paintings reminds us of what we lost 


T he late Mark Clarke was such a gentle, 
unassuming man that it was easy, when 
he was alive, to forget what a masterful 
artist he was. Clarke didn’t boast. He 
didn’t market himself. He sometimes 
failed to show up at his own openings. He just 
painted, day in, day out, for well more than half 
a century. 

As a result, nearly every time I stand in front 
of his paintings I am shocked at how very good 
they are, as I was again last week on visiting a 
new show of his work at his daughter’s down¬ 
town gallery. 

Clarke, who died suddenly in 2016, was a 
quiet genius with a brush and paint. If you have 
any doubt at all about this, walk into the Karin 
Clarke Gallery and look at the three large paint¬ 
ings hanging on the wall to your left. Together, 
they summarize his deep understanding of the 
misty, foggy, vague Northwestern landscape. 

On the left is “Stream to the Sea.” Painted in 
2011, it’s a symphony composed of simple dark 
tones and textures. In the center is “Sienna Sky 
Over Blue Hill,” a four-foot-square canvas that 
reduces the landscape to no more than a handful 
of gently colored forms. 

On the right, the third painting, untitled, breaks into ebullient color, at least by Clarke’s 
sober standards. The wall card says it’s a landscape viewed from Highway 99, which would 
probably mean it was painted up the road a piece from Junction City, where he was born 
and grew up. 

But that’s the thing with Clarke’s work. The untitled painting appears to be a perfectly 


accurate description of a place that may or may not ac¬ 
tually exist. He spent so many hours over so many years 
studying the soft Willamette Valley landscape that it be¬ 
came part of his muscle memory. Late in life he could 
glimpse a landscape while driving by, perhaps slowing 
down to study it for a moment, and then return to the 
tiny basement studio where he worked at his Eugene 
home and reproduce it perfectly. 

Clarke always joked that his paintings were “myo¬ 
pic.” They don’t contain much in the way of fine de¬ 
tail, substituting instead a patient process of layering, 
sanding, scraping and glazing acrylic paint until he got 
the effect he was after. But it is the spot-on emotional 
accuracy of these “myopic” paintings that makes them 
local masterpieces. 

Across the room from those big three canvases is a 
smaller one, titled “Receding Fog,” just a cool, pale sea 
of bright color. 

Clarke painted it in 2015, the year before he died. 
As the title suggests, it’s a painting of fog — just fog, 
and nothing more. No hint of landscape or seascape 
lies concealed in this fog, no ghostly figures about to 
emerge from the mist. And yet it’s absolutely captivat¬ 
ing, a simple study of tone and color in the weather we 
Northwesterners all know so intimately. 

Clarke and his wife, painter Margaret Coe, were 
honored after his death by a retrospective at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art last year. 
He was, and is, a Northwest treasure. This new exhibit of his work downtown offers one 
more chance to admire his myopic genius at close range. 

Classics, an exhibition of Mark Clarke’s work, continues at the Karin Clarke Gallery, 760 Willamette Street, through Sept. 
29. A reception will be held during the First Friday ArtWalk, which begins at 5:30 pm Friday, Sept. 7. 



CLASSIFIEDS 


To place a classified ad: CALL 541.484.0519 EMAILclassy@eugeneweekly.com = line ads: $11/3 lines 
WRITE 1251 Lincoln St. Eugene, OR 97401 VISIT our office Monday-Friday 9a-5p = additional lines: $4 


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BULLETIN BOARD 


Announcements 

EUGENE SEX ADDICTS ANONYMOUS Helpline 
Recording (541-342-5582). For meetings 8c 
information: www.eugene-saa.com 


Opportunities 

EUGENE PEACE CHOIR Come sing for the 
planet, all voices welcome. Julia 541-968- 
5896. julia (3eugenepeacechoir.com 


Pets 


GREENHILL HUMANE SOCIETY Everybody 
Deserves a Good Home. Open Fr-Tu lla-6p, 
closed We/Th. 88530 Green Hill Rd 541-689- 
1503 and 1st Avenue Shelter open Tu-Fr 
10a-6p 8c Sa 10a-5:30p, closed Su/Mo. 
3920 W. 1st Ave 541-844-1222. green-hill, 
org See our Pet of the Week! 


SHELTER ANIMAL RESOURCE ALLIANCE 

SAR.A.’s Treasures Gift 8c Thrift Shop. 

Volunteer, Donate, Shop, ADOPT! 

821 River Road, Open Daily 10am-6pm. 
541-602-8892 sarastreasures.org 

LOOK FOR THIS WEEK’S RESCUED CAT. 


EVENTS 


R0SEBURG GUN SHOW Sat. Sept. 15th 
9am-5pm. Sun. Sept. 16th 9am-3pm. Douglas 
County Fairgrounds. Info call 541-530-4520 


FOR SALE 


Crafts 


WHITE SILK YARDAGE, CUT VELVET YARDAGE, 

fabric dyes, professional steamer, hang¬ 
ers,8c MUCH MORE! . Call 541-229-3913 for 
info. 


Garage Sales 

MOVING GARAGE SALE, SEPTEMBER 7TH & 8TH 

: Friday - 3-8 p.m. 9/2/18 8c Saturday - 8 a.m. 
-4pm 9/8/18 2865 CHUCKANUT 

KnickKnacks, Kitchen Stuff,Glassware, 
Garden Supplies, Handyman Tools Halloween 
Costumes, Camping Supplies 8c ETC 


NEIGHBORHOOD MOVING & YARD SALE! 9/15- 
9/16, Lawrence 8c 18th, 9am-3pm 
Furniture, books, clothes, kitchenware, etc. 


EMPLOYMENT 


Help Wanted 

CHRYSALIS BEHAVIORAL HEALTH IS SEEKING 
AFULLTIME MH COUNSELOR looking to make 
a difference in our community. For further 
details and to apply, go to WWW.WHITEBIRD- 
CLINIC.ORG 


NOW HIRING TELEPHONE INTERVIEWERS. 

$11.25+ Incentivized Pay. 2pm M-6 10am 
Sat/Sun. WWW.VENTUREDATA.COM 


WELLNESS 


Wellness 


NEED BIRTH CONTROL? AN ANNUAL 
WELLNESS EXAM? STI TESTING AND 
TREATMENT? Planned Parenthood of 
Southwestern Oregon accepts Insurance, 
Medicaid (OHP) and self-paying patients. 
ALL ARE WELCOME HERE! Make an appoint¬ 
ment online today at ppsworegon.org or call 
800-230-PLAN 


HOME SERVICES 


Hauling 

THE RECYCLERS SINCE 1989 Jim Calhoun 
541.953.6625 Gus Ramirez 541.514.4283 
SPRING CLEAN UPS. Save on dump runs, 
yardwork, bark delivery, chainsaw work, 
hottubs, scrap removal 


Recycling 

FREE RECYCLING,FREE REMOVAL Appliances, 
AC units, computers, batteries, metal, mow¬ 
ers, bottles/cans. Tom 541-653-4425. 


Home Services 


HOME IMPROVEMENT PAINTING : Interior 8c 
exterior, I can fix all other repairs as well. 
Free estimates, Low Cost. Matthew- 541- 
221-0420 


PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 


Attorney/Legal 

DIVORCE $155. Complete preparation. 
Includes children, custody, support, proper¬ 
ty and bills division. No court appearances. 
Divorced in 1-5 weeks possible. 503-222- 
5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com 
legalalt (® msn.com 


Film/Video/Photography 

COMMUNITY TELEVISION (Comcast channel 
29) offers hands-on classes in Studio and 
Field Production 8c Digital Editing. For info 
call 541-290-6616 or info(3ctv29.org 


LEGAL NOTICES 


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF 
OREGON FOR LANE COUNTY - PROBATE 
DEPARTMENT: Case No. 18PB04046. NOTICE 
TO INTERESTED PERSONS In the matter of 
the Estate of Norma Bruce Christensen, 
Decedent, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that 
Dennis Jack Jeffrey has been appointed 
personal representative. All persons having 
claims against the estate are required to 
present them, with vouchers attached, to 
the aforementioned personal representa¬ 
tive c/o Northwest Legal, Attn: Jinoo 
Hwang, 856 Olive Street, Suite 106, Eugene, 
OR 92401, within four months after the date 
of first publication of this notice, or the 
claims may be barred. All persons whose 
rights may be affected by the proceedings 
may obtain additional information from the 
records of the court, the personal represen¬ 
tative, or attorney for the personal repre¬ 
sentative, Northwest Legal, Attn: Jinoo 
Hwang, 856 Olive Street, Suite 106, Eugene, 
OR 92401. 


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF 
OREGON FOR BENTON COUNTY JUVENILE 
DEPARTMENT. In the Matter of MIKAEL 
DAMIEN MOORE, A child. Case No. 
18JU05245. PUBLISHED SUMMONS TO: 

REBECCA LYNN MOORE IN THE NAME OF 
THE STATE OF OREGON: A petition has been 
filed asking the court to establish jurisdic¬ 
tion under ORS 419B.100 for the above- 
named child. YOU ARE REQUIRED TO 
PERSONALLY APPEAR BEFORE the Benton 
County Court at 120 NW 4th Street, 
Corvallis, Oregon 92330, on the 5th day of 
October, 2018 at 8:30 a.m. to admit or deny 


the allegations of the petition and to per¬ 
sonally appear at any subsequent court-or¬ 
dered hearing. YOU MUST APPEAR 
PERSONALLY IN THE COURTROOM ON THE 
DATE AND AT THE TIME LISTED ABOVE. AN 
ATTORNEY MAY NOT ATTEND THE HEARING IN 
YOUR PUCE. THEREFORE, YOU MUST APPEAR 
EVEN IFYOUR ATTORNEY ALSO APPEARS. This 
summons is published pursuant to the 
order of the circuit court judge of the 
above-entitled court, dated August 13, 
2018. The order directs that this summons 
be published once each week for three 
consecutive weeks, making three publica¬ 
tions in all, in a published newspaper of 
general circulation in Lane County, Oregon. 
Date of first publication: August 23, 2018. 
Date of last publication: September 6,2018. 
NOTICE: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY- 

IF YOU DO NOT APPEAR PERSONALLY BEFORE 
THE COURT OR DO NOT APPEAR AT ANY 
SUBSEQUENT COURT-ORDERED HEARING, 
the court may proceed in your absence 
without further notice and take jurisdiction 
of the above-named children either ON THE 
DATE SPECIFIED IN THIS SUMMONS OR ON A 
FUTURE DATE , and may make such orders 
and take such action as authorized by law. 
RIGHTS AND OBLIGATIONS 

(1) YOU HAVE A RIGHT TO BE 
REPRESENTED BY AN ATTORNEY IN THIS 
MATTER. If you are currently represented 
by an attorney, CONTACT YOUR ATTORNEY 
IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTICE. 
Your previous attorney may not be repre¬ 
senting you in this matter. IF YOU CANNOT 
AFFORD TO HIRE AN ATTORNEY and you meet 
the state’s financial guidelines, you are 
entitled to have an attorney appointed for 
you at state expense. TO REQUEST 
APPOINTMENT OF AN ATTORNEY TO 
REPRESENT YOU AT STATE EXPENSE, YOU 
MUST IMMEDIATELY CONTACT the Benton 
Juvenile Department at 120 NW 4th Street, 
Corvallis, OR 92330, phone number (541) 
266-6828, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. 
and 5:00 p.m. for further information. IF 
YOU WISH TO HIRE AN ATTORNEY, please 
retain one as soon as possible and have the 
attorney present at the above hearing. If 
you need help finding an attorney, you may 
call the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral 
Service at (503) 684-3263 or toll free in 
Oregon at (800) 452-2636. IF YOU ARE 
REPRESENTED BY AN ATTORNEY, IT IS YOUR 
RESPONSIBILITY TO MAINTAIN CONTACT WITH 
YOUR ATTORNEY AND TO KEEP YOUR 
ATTORNEY ADVISED OF YOUR WHEREABOUTS. 

( 2 ) If you contest the petition, 


the court will schedule a hearing on the 
allegations of the petition and order you to 
appear personally and may schedule other 
hearings related to the petition and order 
you to appear personally. IF YOU ARE 
ORDERED TO APPEAR, YOU MUST APPEAR 
PERSONALLY IN THE COURTROOM, UNLESS 
THE COURT HAS GRANTED YOU AN EXCEPTION 
IN ADVANCE UNDER ORS 419B.918 TO 
APPEAR BY OTHER MEANS INCLUDING, BUT 
NOT LIMITED TO, TELEPHONIC OR OTHER 
ELECTRONIC MEANS. AN ATTORNEY MAY NOT 
ATTEND THE HEARING(S) IN YOUR PLACE. 
PETITIONER’S ATTORNEY: Kristyn M 
Houston, Assistant Attorney General, 
Department of Justice, 1162 Court 

Street NE, Salem, OR 92301- 
4096,Phone: (503) 934-4400 ISSUED THIS 
16 DAY OF AUGUST, 2018. Issued 

by:Kristyn M Houston #145304, Assistant 
Attorney General 


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF 
OREGON FOR BENTON COUNTY JUVENILE 
DEPARTMENT. In the Matter of BRANDON 
MICHAEL THOMASON, A child. Case No. 
18JU06003. PUBLISHED SUMMONS TO: 

REBECCA LYNN MOORE IN THE NAME OF 
THE STATE OF OREGON: A petition has been 
filed asking the court to establish jurisdic¬ 
tion under ORS 419B.100 for the above- 
named child. YOU ARE REQUIRED TO 
PERSONALLY APPEAR BEFORE the Benton 
County Court at 120 NW 4th Street, 
Corvallis, Oregon 92330, on the 5th day of 
October, 2018 at 8:30 a.m. to admit or deny 
the allegations of the petition and to per¬ 
sonally appear at any subsequent court-or¬ 
dered hearing. YOU MUST APPEAR 
PERSONALLY IN THE COURTROOM ON THE 
DATE AND AT THE TIME LISTED ABOVE. AN 
ATTORNEY MAY NOT ATTEND THE HEARING IN 
YOUR PUCE. THEREFORE, YOU MUST APPEAR 
EVEN IF YOUR ATTORNEY ALSO APPEARS. This 
summons is published pursuant to the 
order of the circuit court judge of the 
above-entitled court, dated August 13, 
2018. The order directs that this summons 
be published once each week for three 
consecutive weeks, making three publica¬ 
tions in all, in a published newspaper of 
general circulation in Lane County, Oregon. 
Date of first publication: August 23, 2018. 
Date of last publication: September 6,2018. 
NOTICE: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY- 

IF YOU DO NOT APPEAR PERSONALLY BEFORE 
THE COURT OR DO NOT APPEAR AT ANY 
SUBSEQUENT COURT-ORDERED HEARING, 
the court may proceed in your absence 


without further notice and take jurisdiction 
of the above-named children either ON THE 

DATE SPECIFIED IN THIS SUMMONS OR ON A 
FUTURE DATE , and may make such orders 
and take such action as authorized by law. 
RIGHTS AND OBLIGATIONS 

(1) YOU HAVE A RIGHT TO BE 
REPRESENTED BY AN ATTORNEY IN THIS 
MATTER. If you are currently represented 
by an attorney, CONTACT YOUR ATTORNEY 
IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTICE. 
Your previous attorney may not be repre¬ 
senting you in this matter. IFYOU CANNOT 
AFFORD TO HIRE AN ATTORNEY and you meet 
the state’s financial guidelines, you are 
entitled to have an attorney appointed for 
you at state expense. TO REQUEST 
APPOINTMENT OF AN ATTORNEY TO 
REPRESENT YOU AT STATE EXPENSE, YOU 
MUST IMMEDIATELY CONTACT the Benton 
Juvenile Department at 120 NW 4th Street, 
Corvallis, OR 92330, phone number (541) 
266-6828, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. 
and 5:00 p.m. for further information. IF 
YOU WISH TO HIRE AN ATTORNEY, please 
retain one as soon as possible and have the 
attorney present at the above hearing. If 
you need help finding an attorney, you may 
call the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral 
Service at (503) 684-3263 or toll free in 
Oregon at (800) 452-2636. IF YOU ARE 
REPRESENTED BY AN ATTORNEY, IT IS YOUR 
RESPONSIBILITY TO MAINTAIN CONTACT WITH 
YOUR ATTORNEY AND TO KEEP YOUR 
ATTORNEY ADVISED OF YOUR WHEREABOUTS. 

( 2 ) If you contest the petition, 

the court will schedule a hearing on the 
allegations of the petition and order you to 
appear personally and may schedule other 
hearings related to the petition and order 
you to appear personally. IF YOU ARE 
ORDERED TO APPEAR, YOU MUST APPEAR 
PERSONALLY IN THE COURTROOM, UNLESS 
THE COURT HAS GRANTED YOU AN EXCEPTION 
IN ADVANCE UNDER ORS 419B.918 TO 
APPEAR BY OTHER MEANS INCLUDING, BUT 
NOT LIMITED TO, TELEPHONIC OR OTHER 
ELECTRONIC MEANS. AN ATTORNEY MAY NOT 
ATTEND THE HEARING(S) IN YOUR PUCE. 
PETITIONER’S ATTORNEY: Kristyn M 
Houston, Assistant Attorney General, 
Department of Justice, 1162 Court 

Street NE, Salem, OR 92301- 
4096,Phone: (503) 934-4400 ISSUEDTHIS 
16 DAY OF AUGUST, 2018. Issued 

by:Kristyn M Houston #145304, Assistant 
Attorney General 


EUGENEWEEKLY.COM 


• September 6, 2018 











CLASSIFIEDS 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF 
OREGON FOR BENTON COUNTY JUVENILE 
DEPARTMENT. In the Matter of BAYLEE 
ROSE MOORE, A child. Case No. 
18JU05744. PUBLISHED SUMMONS TO: 

REBECCA LYNN MOORE IN THE NAME 
OF THE STATE OF OREGON: A petition has 
been filed asking the court to establish 
jurisdiction under ORS 419B.100 for the 
above-named child. YOU ARE REQUIRED 
TO PERSONALLY APPEAR BEFORE the 
Benton County Court at 120 NW 4th 
Street, Corvallis, Oregon 92330, on the 
5th day of October, 2018 at 8:30 a.m. to 
admit or deny the allegations of the peti¬ 
tion and to personally appear at any sub¬ 
sequent court-ordered hearing. YOU MUST 
APPEAR PERSONALLY IN THE COURTROOM 
ON THE DATE AND AT THE TIME LISTED 
ABOVE. AN ATTORNEY MAY NOT ATTEND THE 
HEARING IN YOUR PLACE. THEREFORE, YOU 
MUST APPEAR EVEN IF YOUR ATTORNEY 
ALSO APPEARS. This summons is pub¬ 
lished pursuant to the order of the circuit 
court judge of the above-entitled court, 
dated August 13, 2018. The order directs 
that this summons be published once 
each week for three consecutive weeks, 
making three publications in all, in a pub¬ 
lished newspaper of general circulation in 
Lane County, Oregon. Date of first publi¬ 
cation: August 23, 2018. Date of last 
publication: September 6, 2018. NOTICE: 
READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY- IF 
YOU DO NOT APPEAR PERSONALLY BEFORE 
THE COURT OR DO NOT APPEAR AT ANY 
SUBSEQUENT COURT-ORDERED HEARING, 
the court may proceed in your absence 
without further notice and take jurisdic¬ 
tion of the above-named children either 
ON THE DATE SPECIFIED IN THIS SUMMONS 
OR ON A FUTURE DATE , and may make 
such orders and take such action as 
authorized by law. RIGHTS AND 
OBLIGATIONS (1) 

YOU HAVE A RIGHT TO BE REPRESENTED BY 
AN ATTORNEY IN THIS MATTER. If you are 
currently represented by an attorney, 
CONTACT YOUR ATTORNEY IMMEDIATELY 
UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTICE. Your previ¬ 
ous attorney may not be representing 
you in this matter. IFYOU CANNOT AFFORD 
TO HIRE AN ATTORNEY and you meet the 
state’s financial guidelines, you are enti¬ 
tled to have an attorney appointed for you 
at state expense. TO REQUEST 
APPOINTMENT OF AN ATTORNEY TO 
REPRESENT YOU AT STATE EXPENSE, YOU 
MUST IMMEDIATELY CONTACT the Benton 
Juvenile Department at 120 NW 4th 
Street, Corvallis, OR 92330, phone num¬ 
ber (541) 266-6828, between the hours 
of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. for further 
information. IF YOU WISH TO HIRE AN 
ATTORNEY, please retain one as soon as 
possible and have the attorney present at 
the above hearing. If you need help find¬ 
ing an attorney, you may call the Oregon 
State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at 
(503) 684-3263 or toll free in Oregon at 
(800) 452-2636. IF YOU ARE 

REPRESENTED BY AN ATTORNEY, IT IS YOUR 
RESPONSIBILITY TO MAINTAIN CONTACT 
WITH YOUR ATTORNEY AND TO KEEP YOUR 
ATTORNEY ADVISED OF YOUR 
WHEREABOUTS. (2) If you con¬ 
test the petition, the court will schedule a 
hearing on the allegations of the petition 
and order you to appear personally and 
may schedule other hearings related to 
the petition and order you to appear per¬ 
sonally. IFYOU ARE ORDERED TO APPEAR, 
YOU MUST APPEAR PERSONALLY IN THE 
COURTROOM, UNLESS THE COURT HAS 
GRANTED YOU AN EXCEPTION IN ADVANCE 
UNDER ORS 41SB.S18 TO APPEAR BY 
OTHER MEANS INCLUDING, BUT NOT 
LIMITED TO, TELEPHONIC OR OTHER 
ELECTRONIC MEANS. AN ATTORNEY MAY 
NOT ATTEND THE HEARING(S) IN YOUR 
PUCE. PETITIONER’S ATTORNEY: Kristyn 
M Houston, Assistant Attorney 
General, Department of Justice, 

1162 Court Street NE, Salem, OR 
92301-4096,Phone: (503) 934-4400 
ISSUED THIS 16 DAY OF AUGUST, 2018. 
Issued by:Kristyn M Houston #145304, 
Assistant Attorney General 


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF 
OREGON FOR UNE COUNTY Case No. 
18PB04049 NOTICE TO INTERESTED 
PERSONS the matter of the Estate of 
Monte Weslie Wilson, Jr., Deceased. 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Ronald L. 
Sperry III has qualified and been appoint¬ 
ed as the Personal Representative of the 
estate. All persons having claims against 
the estate are hereby required to present 
them, with proper vouchers, within four 
months after the date of first publication 
of this notice, as stated below, to the 
Personal Representative, Ronald L. Sperry 
III, c/o DC Law, McKinney 8c Sperry, PC, P.0. 
Box 1265, Roseburg, OR 92420, or the 
claims may be barred. DATED AND FIRST 
PUBLISHED THIS 30TH DAY OF AUGUST, 
2018. Personal Representative: Ronald L. 
Sperry III, 0SB #091525, DC Law, 
McKinney 8c Sperry PC, P0 Box 1265, 
Roseburg, OR 92420, Telephone: 541- 
623-4451 Fax: 541-623-1202 


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF 
OREGON FOR UNE COUNTY Probate 
Department: In the Matter of the Estate 
of: CAROLYN ANN CARL, Deceased. Case 
No. 18PB03380. NOTICE TO INTERESTED 
PERSONS: NOTICE IS GIVEN that Kathryn 
Oborski has been appointed personal rep¬ 
resentative of this estate. All persons 
having claims against the estate are 


required to present them, with vouchers 
attached, to the personal representative 
c/o Robert Cole Tozer, Attorney at Law, 
925 Oak St., Suite 615, Eugene, Oregon, 
92401, (541)345-0295, within four 
months of the date of first publication of 
this notice, or the claims may be barred. 
All persons whose rights may be affected 
by the proceedings may obtain additional 
information from the records of the court, 
the personal representative, or the per¬ 
sonal representative’s attorney, Robert 
Cole Tozer. DATED AND FIRST PUBLISHED 
AUGUST30,2018.Personal Representative 
/s/Kathryn Oborski 


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF 
OREGON FOR UNE COUNTY- JUVENILE 
DEPARTMENT: Case No. 18JU04192, Case 
No. 18JU04198. PUBLISHED SUMMONS In 
the Matters of: ISAAC NATHANIEL LOGAN 
EDRIS, KAYDEN LEE MICHAEL EDRIS, 
Children. TO: JACOB LOGAN EDRIS IN 
THE NAME OF THE STATE OF OREGON: A 
petition has been filed asking the court to 
terminate your parental rights to the 
above-named child for the purpose of 
placing the child for adoption. YOU ARE 
REQUIRED TO PERSONALLY APPEAR 
BEFORE the Lane County Juvenile Court 
at 2222 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., 
Eugene, Oregon 92401, on the 4th day of 
October, 2018 at 10:00 a.m. to admit or 
deny the allegations of the petition and to 
personally appear at any subsequent 
court-ordered hearing. YOU MUST APPEAR 
PERSONALLY IN THE COURTROOM ON THE 
DATE AND AT THE TIME LISTED ABOVE. AN 
ATTORNEYMAYNOTATTENDTHE HEARING IN 
YOUR PUCE. THEREFORE, YOU MUST 
APPEAR EVEN IF YOUR ATTORNEY ALSO 
APPEARS. This summons is published 
pursuant to the order of the circuit court 
judge of the above-entitled court, dated 
August 1st, 2018. The order directs that 
this summons be published once each 
week for three consecutive weeks, mak- 
ingthree publications in all, in a published 
newspaper of general circulation in Lane 
County. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA¬ 

TION: AUGUST 30TH, 2018 DATE OF UST 
PUBLICATION: SEPTEMBER 13TH, 2018. 
NOTICE READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY- 
IFYOU DO NOT APPEAR PERSONALLY BEFORE 
THE COURT AS DIRECTED ABOVE, THEN YOU 
MUST APPEAR ON OCTOBER 18, 2018 AT 
10:00 A.M. AT THE SAME ADDRESS LISTED 
ABOVE. IF YOU FAIL TO APEAR FOR BOTH OF 
THESE DATES OR DO NOT APPEAR AT ANY 
SUBSEQUENT COURT-ORDERED HEARING, 
the court may proceed in your absence 
without further notice and TERMINATE YOUR 
PARENTAL RIGHTS to the above-named child 
either ON THE DATES SPECIFIED IN THIS 
SUMMONS OR ON A FUTURE DATE, and may 
make such orders and take such action as 
authorized by law. RIGHTS AND 
OBLIGATIONS (1) YOU HAVE A 

RIGHT TO BE REPRESENTED BY AN 
ATTORNEY IN THIS MATTER. If you are cur¬ 
rently represented by an attorney, 
CONTACT YOUR ATTORNEY IMMEDIATELY 
UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTICE. Your previ¬ 
ous attorney may not be representing 
you in this matter. IFYOU CANNOT AFFORD 
TO HIRE AN ATTORNEY and you meet the 
state’s financial guidelines, you are enti¬ 
tled to have an attorney appointed for you 
at state expense. TO REQUEST 
APPOINTMENT OF AN ATTORNEY TO 
REPRESENT YOU AT STATE EXPENSE, YOU 
MUST IMMEDIATELY CONTACT the Lane 
Juvenile Department at 2222 Martin 
Luther King Jr. Blvd, Eugene, OR 92401, at 
541/682-4254 , between the hours of 
8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. for further infor¬ 
mation. IFYOU WISH TO HIRE AN ATTORNEY, 
please retain one as soon as possible and 
have the attorney present at the above 
hearing. If you need help finding an attor¬ 
ney, you may call the Oregon State Bar’s 
Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684- 
3263 or toll free in Oregon at (800) 452- 
2636. IF YOU ARE REPRESENTED BY AN 
ATTORNEY, IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO 
MAINTAIN CONTACT WITH YOUR ATTORNEY 
AND TO KEEP YOUR ATTORNEY ADVISED OF 
YOUR WHEREABOUTS. (2) If you con¬ 
test the petition, the court will schedule a 
hearing on the allegations of the petition 
and order you to appear personally and 
may schedule other hearings related to 
the petition and order you to appear per¬ 
sonally. IFYOU ARE ORDERED TO APPEAR, 
YOU MUST APPEAR PERSONALLY IN THE 
COURTROOM, UNLESS THE COURT HAS 
GRANTED YOU AN EXCEPTION IN ADVANCE 
UNDER ORS 419B.918 TO APPEAR BY 
OTHER MEANS INCLUDING, BUT NOT 
LIMITED TO, TELEPHONIC OR OTHER 
ELECTRONIC MEANS. AN ATTORNEY MAY 
NOT ATTEND THE HEARING(S) IN YOUR 
PLACE. PETITIONER’S ATTORNEY 
Luke A. Stanton, Senior Assistant Attorney 
General, Department of Justice, 925 Oak 
Street, Suite 200, Eugene, OR 92401, 
Phone: (541) 686-2923, ISSUED this 
30th day of August, 2018. ISSUED BY: 

/S/ KATHERINE D. YANCEY Katherine D. 
Yancey, #136514, Assistant Attorney 
General, for Luke A. Stanton #095180, 
Senior Assistant Attorney General 


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF 
OREGON FOR LANE COUNTY: Case. No 
18CV19322, PUBLISHED SUMMONS: 

SHAWN E O’CONNOR, Plaintiff, v. RONALD 
CLARK a/k/a RONALD LYNN CLARK JR., 
Defendant. TO: Ronald Clark a/k/a Ronald 
Lynn Clark Jr. You are hereby required to 
appear and defend the First Amended 
Complaint filed against you in the 
above-entitled action within thirty (30) 
days from the date the first publication of 


this Published Summons. If you fail to 
appearand answer, the Plaintiff will apply 
to the above-entitled court for relief 
demanded in the First Amended 
Complaint. The First Amended Complaint 
filed against you is for indemnity and 
unjust enrichment. The Plaintiff prays for 
judgment against Defendant and in favor 
of Plaintiff forthe sum of $22,212.22, plus 
interest thereon at the rate of 9% per 
annum from September 22, 2014, until 
paid, plus Plaintiff’s costs and disburse¬ 
ment incurred herein and any other relief 
the court deems just and equitable. 
NOTICE TO THE DEFENDANT: READ THESE 
PAPERS CAREFULLY! You must “appear” in 
this case or the other side will win auto¬ 
matically. To “appear” you must file with 
the court a legal paper called a “motion” 
or “answer”. The “motion” or “answer” (or 
“reply”) must be given to the court clerk 
or administrator WITHIN 30 DAYS OF THE 
DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION SPECIFIED 
HEREIN along with the required filing fee. 
It must be in proper form and have proof 
of service on the plaintiff’s attorney or, if 
plaintiff does not have any attorney, 
proof of service upon the plaintiff. If you 
have any questions, you should see an 
attorney immediately. If you need help in 
finding an attorney, you may contact the 
Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral 
Service online at WWW.OREGONSTATEBAR. 
ORG or by calling (503) 684-3263 (in the 
Portland metropolitan area) or toll-free in 
Oregon at (800) 452-2636. DATE OF FIRST 
PUBLICATI0N:08/16/18, DATE OF UST 
PUBLICATION: 09/06/18 BASSINGER 8c 
HARVEY /s/ Scott G. Bassinger, OSB 
#920285 Of Attorneys for Plaintiff, Trial 
Attorney: Scott G. Bassinger scottt® 
bassingerharveylaw.com 


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF 
OREGON FOR UNE COUNTY: Probate 
Department. In the Matter of the Estate of 
GARY EUGENE MARSHALL, Deceased. 
Case No. 18PB05269: NOTICE TO 
INTERESTED PERSONS: Notice is hereby 
given that Jeremy Allen Marshall has 
been appointed and has qualified as the 
personal representative of the estate. All 
persons having claims against the estate 
are hereby required to present the same, 
with proper vouchers, within four months 
after the date of first publication of this 
notice, as stated below, to the personal 
representative at: Jeremy Allen Marshall, 
C/O Lynn Shepard, Attorney at Law, 66 
Club Road, Suite 200, Eugene, Oregon 
92401, or they may be barred. All persons 
whose rights may be affected by the pro¬ 
ceedings in this estate may obtain addi¬ 
tional information from the records of the 
court, the personal representative or the 
attorney for the personal representative. 
DATED AND FIRSTPUBLISHED: 08/23/2018. 
/s/ Jeremy Allen Marshall, Personal 
Representative. Lynn Shepard, Attorney 
for Personal Representative, 66 Club 
Road, Suite 200, Eugene , Oregon 92401. 
(541) 485-3222 


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF 
OREGON FOR UNE COUNTY: Probate 
Department. In the Matter of the Estate of 
JOSEPH TOLSTIKO, Deceased. Case No. 
18PB04500: NOTICE TO INTERESTED 
PERSONS: Notice is hereby given that 
Jerome Jaros has been appointed and 
has qualified as the personal representa¬ 
tive of the estate. All persons having 
claims against the estate are hereby 
required to present the same, with proper 
vouchers, within four months after the 
date of first publication of this notice, as 
stated below, to the personal representa¬ 
tive at: Jerome Jaros, c/o Lynn Shepard, 
Attorney at Law, 66 Club Road, Suite 200, 
Eugene, Oregon 92401, or they may be 
barred. All persons whose rights may be 
affected by the proceedings in this estate 
may obtain additional information from 
the records of the court or the personal 
representative. DATED AND FIRST PUB¬ 
LISHED: 08/30/2018. /s/ Jerome Jaros 
Personal Representative. Lynn Shepard, 
Attorney for Personal Representative, 66 
Club Road, Suite 200, Eugene , Oregon 
92401.(541) 485-32 2 2 


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF 
OREGON FOR UNE COUNTY: Probate 
Department. In the Matter of the Estate of 
MILLARD C. THOMAS, Deceased. No. 
18PB05005. NOTICE TO INTERESTED 
PERSONS- Notice is hereby given that 
Kevin Scribner has been appointed and 
has qualified as the personal representa¬ 
tive of the estate. All persons having 
claims against the estate are hereby 
required to present the same, with proper 
vouchers, within four months after the 
date of first publication of this notice, as 
stated below, to the personal representa¬ 
tive at: Kevin Scribner, c/o Lynn Shepard, 
Attorney at Law, 66 Club Road, Suite 200, 
Eugene, Oregon 92401, or they may be 
barred. All persons whose rights may be 
affected by the proceedings in this estate 
may obtain additional information from 
the records of the court or the personal 
representative. DATED AND FIRST PUB¬ 
LISHED: 09/06/2018. /s/ Kevin Scribner, 
Personal Representative. Lynn Shepard, 
Attorney for Personal Representative, 66 
Club Road, Suite 200, Eugene , Oregon 
92401.(541) 485-3222 


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF 
OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF LANE- 
JUVENILE DEPARTMENT. Case No. 
18JU01013. PUBLISHED SUMMONS In the 

Matter of: RHIAN STIHL SHEEHY, A Child. TO: 

MARIAH LOGAN KINNEY, AKA MORIAH L. 


KINNEY: IN THE NAME OF THE STATE OF 

OREGON A petition has been filed asking the 
court to terminate your parental rights to 
the above-named child for the purpose of 
placing the child for adoption. YOU ARE 
REQUIRED TO PERSONALLY APPEAR BEFORE 
the Lane County Juvenile Court at 2222 
Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Eugene, Oregon 
92401, ON THE 4TH DAY OF OCTOBER, 2018 
AT 10:00 A.M. to admit or deny the allega¬ 
tions of the petition and to personally 
appear at any subsequent court-ordered 
hearing. YOU MUST APPEAR PERSONALLY IN 
THE COURTROOM ON THE DATE AND AT THE 
TIME LISTED ABOVE. AN ATTORNEY MAY NOT 
ATTEND THE HEARING IN YOUR PUCE. 
THEREFORE, YOU MUST APPEAR EVEN IF 
YOUR ATTORNEY ALSO APPEARS. This sum¬ 
mons is published pursuant to the order of 
the circuit court judge of the above-entitled 
court, dated July 31,2018. The order directs 
that this summons be published once each 
week for three consecutive weeks, making 
three publications in all, in a published 
newspaper of general circulation in Lane 
County. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: 
AUGUST 30TH, 2018 DATE OF 

UST PUBLICATION: SEPTEMBER 13TH, 2018 
NOTICE- READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY IF 
YOU DO NOT APPEAR PERSONALLY BEFORE 
THE COURT AS DIRECTED ABOVE, THEN YOU 
MUST APPEAR ON OCTOBER 18, 2018 AT 
10:00 A.M. AT THE SAME ADDRESS LISTED 
ABOVE. IFYOU FAIL TO APPEAR FOR BOTH OF 
THESE DATES OR DO NOT APPEAR AT ANY 
SUBSEQUENT COURT-ORDERED HEARING, 
the court may proceed in your absence 
without further notice and TERMINATE YOUR 
PARENTAL RIGHTS to the above-named 
child either ON THE DATES SPECIFIED IN THIS 
SUMMONS OR ON A FUTURE DATE, and may 
make such orders and take such action as 
authorized by law. RIGHTS AND OBLIGATIONS 

(1) YOU HAVE A RIGHT TO BE 
REPRESENTED BY AN ATTORNEY IN THIS 
MATTER. If you are currently represented 
by an attorney, CONTACT YOUR ATTORNEY 
IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTICE. 
Your previous attorney may not be repre¬ 
senting you in this matter. IFYOU CANNOT 
AFFORD TO HIRE AN ATTORNEY and you 
meet the state’s financial guidelines, you 
are entitled to have an attorney appointed 
for you at state expense. TO REQUEST 
APPOINTMENT OF AN ATTORNEY TO 
REPRESENT YOU AT STATE EXPENSE, YOU 
MUST IMMEDIATELY CONTACT the Lane 
Juvenile Department at 2222 Martin Luther 
King Jr. Blvd, Eugene, OR 92401, at 541/682- 
4254, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 
5:00 p.m. for further information. IF YOU 
WISH TO HIRE AN ATTORNEY, please retain 
one as soon as possible and have the attor¬ 
ney present at the above hearing. If you 
need help finding an attorney, you may call 
the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral 
Service at (503) 684-3263 or toll free in 
Oregon at (800) 452-2636. IF YOU ARE 
REPRESENTED BY AN ATTORNEY, IT IS YOUR 
RESPONSIBILITY TO MAINTAIN CONTACT WITH 
YOUR ATTORNEY AND TO KEEP YOUR 
ATTORNEY ADVISED OF YOUR WHEREABOUTS. 

(2) If you contest the petition, 

the court will schedule a hearing on the 
allegations of the petition and order you to 
appear personally and may schedule other 
hearings related to the petition and order 
you to appear personally. IF YOU ARE 
ORDERED TO APPEAR, YOU MUST APPEAR 
PERSONALLY IN THE COURTROOM, UNLESS 
THE COURT HAS GRANTED YOU AN EXCEPTION 
IN ADVANCE UNDER ORS 419B.918 TO 
APPEAR BY OTHER MEANS INCLUDING, BUT 
NOT LIMITED TO, TELEPHONIC OR OTHER 
ELECTRONIC MEANS. AN ATTORNEY MAY NOT 
ATTEND THE HEARING(S) IN YOUR PUCE. 
PETITIONER’S ATTORNEY, Katherine D. 
Yancey,Assistant Attorney General, 
Department of Justice, 925 Oak Street, 
Suite 200, Eugene, OR, 02401, Phone: 
(541)686-2923. ISSUED this 

30th day of August, 2018. ISSUED BY: /S/ 
KATHERINED.YANCEY, Katherine D. Yancey, 
#136514, Assistant Attorney General 


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF 
OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF LANE- 
JUVENILE DEPARTMENT. Case No. 
12JU08128. PUBLISHED SUMMONS: In the 
Matter of: DOMINIKRAVEN MEYER , A Child. 
TO: SAMANTHA ADONA MEYER. 

IN THE NAME OF THE STATE OF OREGON: A 
petition has been filed askingthe court to 
terminate your parental rights to the 
above-named child for the purpose of 
placing the child for adoption. YOU ARE 
REQUIRED TO PERSONALLY APPEAR 
BEFORE the Lane County Juvenile Court 
at 2222 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., 
Eugene, Oregon 92401, ON THE 4TH DAY 
OF OCTOBER, 2018 AT 10:00 A.M. to admit 
or deny the allegations of the petition and 
to personally appear at any subsequent 
court-ordered hearing. YOU MUST APPEAR 
PERSONALLY IN THE COURTROOM ON THE 
DATE AND AT THE TIME LISTED ABOVE. AN 
ATTORNEYMAYNOTATTENDTHE HEARING IN 
YOUR PUCE. THEREFORE, YOU MUST 
APPEAR EVEN IF YOUR ATTORNEY ALSO 
APPEARS. This summons is published 
pursuant to the order of the circuit court 
judge of the above-entitled court, dated 
July 31, 2018. The order directs that this 
summons be published once each week 
for three consecutive weeks, making 
three publications in all, in a published 
newspaper of general circulation in Lane 
County. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA¬ 

TION: AUGUST 30, 2018. DATE OF UST 
PUBLICATION: SEPTEMBER 13, 2018. 
NOTICE- READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY: 
IF YOU DO NOT APPEAR PERSONALLY 
BEFORE THE COURT AS DIRECTED ABOVE, 
THEN YOU MUST APPEAR ON OCTOBER 18, 


2018 AT 10:00 A.M. AT THE SAME ADDRESS 
LISTED ABOVE. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR FOR 
BOTH OF THESE DATES OR DO NOT APPEAR 
AT ANY SUBSEQUENT COURT-ORDERED 
HEARING, the court may proceed in your 
absence without further notice and 
TERMINATE YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS to the 
above-named child either ON THE DATES 
SPECIFIED IN THIS SUMMONS OR ON A 
FUTURE DATE, and may make such orders 
and take such action as authorized by 
law. RIGHTS AND OBLIGATIONS (1) YOU 

HAVE A RIGHT TO BE REPRESENTED BY AN 
ATTORNEY IN THIS MAHER. If you are cur¬ 
rently represented by an attorney, 
CONTACT YOUR ATTORNEY IMMEDIATELY 
UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTICE. Your previ¬ 
ous attorney may not be representing 
you in this matter. IFYOU CANNOT AFFORD 
TO HIRE AN ATTORNEY and you meet the 
state’s financial guidelines, you are enti¬ 
tled to have an attorney appointed for you 
at state expense. TO REQUEST 
APPOINTMENT OF AN ATTORNEY TO 
REPRESENT YOU AT STATE EXPENSE, YOU 
MUST IMMEDIATELY CONTACT the Lane 
Juvenile Department at 2222 Martin 
Luther King Jr. Blvd, Eugene, OR 92401, at 
541/682-4254 , between the hours of 
8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. for further infor¬ 
mation. IFYOU WISH TO HIRE AN AHORNEY, 
please retain one as soon as possible and 
have the attorney present at the above 
hearing. If you need help finding an attor¬ 
ney, you may call the Oregon State Bar’s 
Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684- 
3263 or toll free in Oregon at (800) 452- 
2636. IF YOU ARE REPRESENTED BY AN 
ATTORNEY, IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO 
MAINTAIN CONTACT WITH YOUR AHORNEY 
AND TO KEEP YOUR ATTORNEY ADVISED OF 
YOUR WHEREABOUTS. (2) If you con¬ 
test the petition, the court will schedule a 
hearing on the allegations of the petition 
and order you to appear personally and 
may schedule other hearings related to 
the petition and order you to appear per¬ 
sonally. IFYOU ARE ORDERED TO APPEAR, 
YOU MUST APPEAR PERSONALLY IN THE 
COURTROOM, UNLESS THE COURT HAS 
GRANTED YOU AN EXCEPTION IN ADVANCE 
UNDER ORS 419B.918 TO APPEAR BY 
OTHER MEANS INCLUDING, BUT NOT 
LIMITED TO, TELEPHONIC OR OTHER 
ELECTRONIC MEANS. AN ATTORNEY MAY 
NOT ATTEND THE HEARING(S) IN YOUR 
PUCE. PETITIONER’S ATTORNEY: Luke A 
Stanton, Senior Assistant Attorney 
General, Department of Justice, 925 Oak 
Street, Suite 200, Eugene, Oregon 92401. 
Phone: (541) 686-2923. Issued this 30th 
day of August, 2018. Issued by: /s/ 
Katherine D. Yancey Katherine D. 
Yancey, #136514, Assistant Attorney 
General, for, Luke A. Stanton #095180, 
Senior Assistant Attorney General. 


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF 
OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF UNE, Case 
No. 18PB06203. NOTICE TO INTERESTED 
PERSONS: In the Matter of the Estate of 
Frank Norman Falch, Deceased. NOTICE IS 
HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has 
been appointed personal representative. 
All persons having claims against the 
estate are required to present them, with 
vouchers attached, to the undersigned 
personal representative at 1245 Park 
Avenue, Eugene, OR 92404, within four 
months after the date of first publication 
of this notice, or the claims may be 
barred. All persons whose rights may be 
affected by the proceedings may obtain 
additional information from the records of 
the court, the personal representative, or 
the attorney forthe personal representa¬ 
tive, Lawrence Deckman, at 2406 
Lawrence Street, Eugene, Oregon 92405 
(541) 231-1222. DATED AND FIRST PUB¬ 
LISHED AUGUST 23, 2018. /s/ Scott 
Miksch, Personal Representative 


NOTICE OF HEARING ON SHERIFFS SALE OF 
YOUR PROPERTY: Dear Michael Tentinger: 
This is to notify you that SUSAN 
JOSEPHINE WHEELER has asked the court 
to order the sheriff to sell property located 
at 3335 HARLOW ROAD, EUGENE, OR 
97401 to satisfy a judgment against 
MICHAEL JAMES TENTINGER. Before decid¬ 
ing whether to order the sale, THE 
KUMATH COUNTY COURT WILL HOLD A 
HEARING ON OCTOBER 15, 2018, AT 10:30 
A.M., IN ROOM 214. The law provides that 
property is your homestead if the proper¬ 
ty is actually used as a home by you, your 
spouse, a dependent parent or a depen¬ 
dent child. If you are temporarily absent 
from the property but intend to move 
back in, the property is still your home¬ 
stead. The law provides that if the proper¬ 
ty is your homestead, then $40,000.00 
of it’s value may not be taken to satisfy a 
judgment against you. In addition, a 
homestead usually may not be sold to 
satisfy a judgment of $3,000 or less. The 
law provides that property may be sold 
despite the fact that it is your homestead 
and all of its value may be taken to satis¬ 
fy a judgment against you if the judgment 
is for child support. IF YOU WISH TO 
PROTECT THIS PROPERTY FROM A SHERIFF’S 
SALE, YOU SHOULD COME TO THE COURT 
HEARING. IFYOU HAVE ANYQUESTIONS,YOU 
SHOULD SEE A LAWYER AT ONCE. Very truly 
yours, Hutchinson Cox. /s/ R. Everett 
Meadows 


NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS: Probate 
proceedings in the Estate of Billie Lynn 
Lauder, Deceased, are now pending in the 
Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for 
Lane County, Case No. 18PB06640, and 
Norman A. Fagin has been appointed 


Personal Representative of the estate. All 
persons having claims against the estate 
are required to present the same, with 
proper vouchers, to the Personal 
Representative, c/o Gleaves Swearingen 
LLP, Attorneys at Law, 925 Oak Street, 
Suite 800, Eugene, OR 92401, within 4 
months from the date of the first publica¬ 
tion of this notice or such claims may be 
barred. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN to all 
persons whose rights may be affected by 
the above entitled proceedings that addi¬ 
tional information may be obtained from 
the records of the Court, the Personal 
Representative or the attorneys for the 
Personal Representative. DATED AND 
FIRST PUBLISHED THIS 6TH DAY OF 
SEPTEMBER, 2018. 


NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS: Probate 
proceedings in the Estate of Cecil Paul De 
Lange, Deceased, are now pending in the 
Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for 
Lane County, Case No. 18PB06281, and 
Linda Diane De Lange has been appointed 
Personal Representative of the estate. All 
persons having claims against the estate 
are required to present the same, with 
proper vouchers, to the Personal 
Representative, c/o Gleaves Swearingen 
LLP, Attorneys at Law, 925 Oak Street, 
Suite 800, Eugene, OR 92401, within 4 
months from the date of the first publica¬ 
tion of this notice or such claims may be 
barred. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN to all 
persons whose rights may be affected by 
the above entitled proceedings that addi¬ 
tional information may be obtained from 
the records of the Court, the Personal 
Representative or the attorneys for the 
Personal Representative. DATED AND 
FIRST PUBLISHED THIS 30TH DAY OF 
AUGUST, 2018. 


STORAGE AUCTION: 30TH ST. SELF STORAGE 

290 30th St., Springfield, OR 92428. 
(541)241-0908. Friday, Sept. 14, 2018 
11:30 AM. UNIT(S) 120 - 12x20 - Cloud, 
122 - 12x20 - Neuroth, 125 - 12x20 - 
Walworth, 234 - 10x20 - Evans, 400A - 
6x10 - Woosley 


TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE: The Trustee 
under the terms of the Trust Deed 
described herein, at the direction of the 
Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the prop¬ 
erty described in the Trust Deed to satisfy 
the obligations secured thereby. 
Pursuant to ORS 86.221, the following 
information is provided: 1. PARTIES: 
Grantor: PAN ESTATES, LLC Trustee: 
CASCADE TITLE COMPANY Successor 
Trustee: GARRETT S. LEDGERWOOD. 
Beneficiary: JOANNE KLEIN, INDIVIDUALLY 
AND AS ASSIGNEE OF PHILIP KLEIN 2. 
DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real prop¬ 
erty is described as follows: A parcel of 
land in the Southeast one-quarter of 
Section 23, Township 19 South, Range 3 
West of the Willamette Meridian, Lane 
County, Oregon, being more particularly 
described as follows: Beginning at a 5/8 
inch rebar marking the North-Northeast 
corner of the L. Bouy Donation Land Claim 
No. 50; thence South 00° 10’ 33” West 
1486.65 feet; thence North 89° 28’ 51” 
West 931.86 feet to a 5/8 inch rebar on 
the Easterly right of way line of Interstate 
Highway No. 5; thence, along said right of 
way line, 1084.05 feet along a 11309.15 
foot radius curve right (the long chord of 
which bears North 00° 02’ 29” East 
1083.63 feet) to a 5/8 inch rebar; thence, 
leaving said right of way line, South 89° 
58’ 25” East 623.28 feet to a 5/8 inch 
rebar; thence North 00 0 10’ 33” East 
395.00 feet to a 5/8 inch rebar; thence 
South 89° 58’ 25” East 261.11 feet to the 
point of beginning, in Lane County, 
Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed 
was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: 
July 29, 2016 Recording No. 2016- 
036390 Official Records of Lane County, 
Oregon 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any 
other person obligated on the Trust Deed 
and Promissory Note secured thereby is 
in default and the Beneficiary seeks to 
foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: 
Monthly payments in the amount of 
$2,365.81 each, due the twenty-ninth 
(29) of each month, for the months of 
August 2016 through May 2018; plus late 
charges and advances; plus any unpaid 
real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 
5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the 
Note which is secured by the Trust Deed 
referred to herein is: Principal balance in 
the amount of $230,000.00; plus inter¬ 
est at the rate of 12.0% per annum from 
July 29, 2016; plus late charges of 
$220.00; plus advances and foreclosure 
attorney fees and costs. 6 . SALE OF 
PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that 
the property will be sold to satisfy the 
obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A 
Trustee’s Notice of Default and Election to 
Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been 
recorded in the Official Records of Lane 
County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: 
November 15, 2018 Time:ll:00 a.m. 
Place: Lane County Courthouse, 125 E. 
8th Avenue, Eugene, Oregon. 8.RIGHTTO 
REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 
86.778 has the right, at any time that is 
not later than five days before the Trustee 
conducts the sale, to have this foreclo¬ 
sure dismissed and the Trust Deed rein¬ 
stated by payment to the Beneficiary of 
the entire amount then due, other than 
such portion of the principal as would not 
then be due had no default occurred, by 
curing any other default that is capable of 
being cured by tendering the perfor¬ 
mance required under the obligation or 


September 6, 2018 • eugeneweekly.com 



Trust Deed and by paying all costs and 
expenses actually incurred in enforcing the 
obligation and Trust Deed, together with the 
trustee’s and attorney’s fees not exceeding 
the amount provided in ORS 86.778. NOTICE 
REGARDING POTENTIAL HAZARDS (This notice 
is required for notices of sale sent on or after 
January 1, 2015.) Without limiting the trust¬ 
ee’s disclaimer of representations or warran¬ 
ties, Oregon law requires the trustee to state 
in this notice that some residential property 
sold at a trustee’s sale may have been used 
in manufacturing methamphetamines, the 
chemical components of which are known to 
be toxic. Prospective purchasers of residen¬ 
tial property should be aware of this potential 
danger before deciding to place a bid for this 
property at the trustee’s sale.YOU MAY REACH 
THE OREGON STATE BAR’S LAWYER REFERRAL 
SERVICE AT 503-684-3763 OR TOLL-FREE IN 
OREGON AT 800-452-7636 OR YOU MAY VISIT 
ITS WEBSITE AT: WWW.OSBAR.ORG. Legal assis¬ 
tance may be available if you have a low 
income and meet federal poverty guidelines. 
For more information and a directory of legal 
aid programs, go to http://www.oregon- 
lawhelp.org. Any questions regarding this 
matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, 
Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #41648.1). 
DATED: JUNE 19, 2018. Garrett S. 

Ledgerwood, Successor Trustee, Hershner 
Hunter, LLP, P.0. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. 


TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE: The Trustee under 
the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, 
at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby 
elects to sell the property described in the 
Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured 
thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.771, the follow¬ 
ing information is provided: 1. PARTIES: 
GrantonVERN W. BENSON, Trusteed. DAVID 
JEWETT, Successor Trustee:GARRETT S. 
LEDGERWOOD, Beneficiary:ESTHER E. 
BEBOUT AND MICHAEL R. BEBOUT, TRUSTEES 
OF THE BEBOUT LIVING TRUST, DATED 
December 6, 2001. 2. DESCRIPTION OF 
PROPERTY: The real property is described as 
follows: As described on the attached Exhibit 
A. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was record¬ 
ed as follows: Date Recorded: October 20, 
2008 Recording No. 2008-057821 Official 
Records of Lane County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. 
The Grantor or any other person obligated on 
the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured 
thereby is in default and the Beneficiary 
seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure 
to pay: The entire Principal balance of 
$90,847.07, due at the maturity date of May 
15, 2016; plus late charges and advances; 
plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, 
plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount 
due on the Note which is secured by the Trust 
Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance 
in the amount of $90,847.07; plus accrued 
interest of $6,899.73 due May 7, 2018; plus 
accruing interest at the rate of 7% per annum 
from May 8, 2018; plus late charges; plus 
advances and foreclosure attorney fees and 
costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee here¬ 
by states that the property will be sold to 
satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust 
Deed. A Trustee’s Notice of Default and 
Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has 
been recorded in the Official Records of Lane 
County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date:October 
25, 2018 Time:ll:00 a.m. Place:Lane County 
Courthouse, 125 E. 8th Avenue, Eugene, 
Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person 
named in ORS 86.778 has the right, at any 
time that is not laterthan five days before the 
Trustee conducts the sale, to have this fore¬ 
closure dismissed and the Trust Deed rein¬ 
stated by payment to the Beneficiary of the 
entire amount then due, other than such 
portion of the principal as would not then be 
due had no default occurred, by curing any 
other default that is capable of being cured by 
tendering the performance required under 
the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all 
costs and expenses actually incurred in 
enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, 
together with the trustee’s and attorney’s 
fees not exceeding the amount provided in 
ORS 86.778. NOTICE REGARDING POTENTIAL 
HAZARDS (This notice is required for notices 
of sale sent on or after January 1, 2015.) 
Without limiting the trustee’s disclaimer of 
representations or warranties, Oregon law 
requires the trustee to state in this notice 
that some residential property sold at a trust¬ 
ee’s sale may have been used in manufactur¬ 
ing methamphetamines , the chemical com¬ 
ponents of which are known to be toxic. 
Prospective purchasers of residential proper¬ 
ty should be aware of this potential danger 
before deciding to place a bid for this proper¬ 
ty at the trustee’s sale. You may reach the 
Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at 
503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800- 
452-7636 or you may visit its website at: 
www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be 
available if you have a low income and meet 
federal poverty guidelines. For more informa¬ 
tion and a directory of legal aid programs, go 
to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org.Any ques¬ 
tions regarding this matter should be direct¬ 
ed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686- 
0344 (is #41577.1).DATED: May 16, 2018. 
Garrett S. Ledgerwood, Successor Trustee, 
Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.0. Box 1475, Eugene, 
OR 97440. 


EXHIBIT A: Beginning at a point on 

the centerline of the County Road, said point 
being 2471.0 feet East of the Southwest cor¬ 
ner of the Jessie M. Mann Donation Land 
Claim No. 74, Township 17 South, Range 2 
West of the Willamette Meridian; running 
thence North 0° 06 1/2’ East 160.6 feet; 
thence East 252.97 feet; thence South 0° 16’ 
West 160.6 feet; thence West 252.54 feet to 
the point of beginning, in Lane County, 
Oregon. EXCEPT THEREFROM the following: 
Beginning at a point on the centerline of the 


County Road, said point being 2471.0 feet 
East of the Southwest corner of the Jessie M. 
Mann Donation Land Claim No. 74, Township 
17 South, Range 2 West of the Willamette 
Meridian, in Lane County, Oregon; thence 
North 00° 06’ 30” East, a distance of 30.00 
feet to the true point of beginning; thence 
North 00° 06’ 30” East, a distance of 130.60 
feet; thence East, a distance of 50 feet; 
thence South 00° 06’ 30” West, a distance of 
130.60 feet; thence West, a distance of 
50.00 feet to the true point of beginning, in 
Lane County, Oregon. ALSO EXCEPT: 
Beginning at a point on the centerline of the 
County Road, said point being 2521.0 feet 
East of the Southwest corner of the Jessie M. 
Mann Donation Land Claim No. 74, Township 
17 South, Range 2 West of the Willamette 
Meridian, in Lane County, Oregon; thence 
North 00° 06’ 30” East, a distance of 30.00 
feet to the true point of beginning; thence 
North 00° 06’ 30” East, a distance of 130.60 
feet; thence East, a distance of 50.00 feet; 
thence South 00° 06’ 30” West, a distance of 
130.60 feet; thence West, a distance of 
50.00 feet to the true point of beginning, in 
Lane County, Oregon. ALSO EXCEPT those 
portions conveyed to the City of Springfield 
by Deeds recorded December 18, 1974, 
Reception No. 74-53167, and recorded March 
20, 1979, Reception No. 79-15967, Lane 
County Official Records, in Lane County, 
Oregon. 


TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALEThe Trustee under 
the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, 
at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby 
elects to sell the property described in the 
Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured 
thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.771, the follow¬ 
ing information is provided: 1. PARTIES: 
Grantor: MICHAEL C. SHEEHAN AND MARCIA 
K. SHEEHAN. Trustee:WESTERN PIONEER 
TITLE COMPANY OF LANE COUNTY Successor 
Trustee: NANCY K. CARY Beneficiary: 

BANNER BANK, ASSIGNEE OF OREGON 
HOUSING AND COMMUNITY SERVICES 
DEPARTMENT, STATE OF OREGON, ASSIGNEE OF 
SIUSLAW VALLEY BANK 2. DESCRIPTION 
OF PROPERTY: The real property is described 
as follows: Beginning at the Northeast corner 
of Lot 13 of MATHEWS’ PARK, as platted and 
recorded at Page 59 of Volume 4, Lane 
County Oregon Plat Records; thence North 
along Polk Street 90 feet; thence West 208.0 
feet parallel with the North line of said Lot 13; 
thence South 90 feet to the North line of said 
Lot 13; thence East 208.0 feet to the place of 
beginning, in Lane County, Oregon. 
EXCEPTING THEREFROM: Beginning at the 
Northeast corner of Lot 13 of MATHEWS’ 
PARK, as platted and recorded at Page 59 of 
Volume 4, Lane County Oregon Plat Records; 
thence North 0° 27’ East along the West mar¬ 
gin of Polk Street 15.00 feet; thence West 
parallel to the North line of said Lot 100.58 
feet; thence North 03° 05’ 40” East along a 
board fence line 75.11 feet; thence West par¬ 
allel to the North line of said Lot 13 110.88 
feet; thence South 0° 27’ West 90.00 feet to 
the North line of said Lot 13; thence East 
along said North line 208.00 feet to the Point 
of Beginning, in Eugene, Lane County, 
Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was 
recorded as follows: Date Recorded: August 
19, 1993 Recording: Reel: 1872R, Fee No. 
9352545. Official Records of Lane County, 
Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any 
other person obligated on the Trust Deed and 
Promissory Note secured thereby is in 
default and the Beneficiary seeks to fore¬ 
close the Trust Deed for failure to pay: 
Monthly payments in the amount of $689.89 
due the first of each month, for the months of 
February 2018 through April 2018; plus 
monthly payments at the new rate of 
$693.44 each, due the first of each month, 
for the months of May 2018 through June 
2018; plus late charges and advances; plus 
any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus 
interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due 
on the Note which is secured by the Trust 
Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance 
in the amount of $16,858.22; plus interest at 
the rate of 6.5000% per annum from January 


1, 2018; plus late charges of $62.48; plus 
advances and foreclosure attorney fees and 
costs. 6.SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee 
hereby states that the property will be sold 
to satisfy the obligations secured by the 
Trust Deed. A Trustee’s Notice of Default and 
Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed 
has been recorded in the Official Records of 
Lane County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. 
Date: November 15, 2018. Time: 11:00 a.m. 
Place: Lane County Courthouse, 125 E. 8th 
Avenue, Eugene, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO 
REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 
86.778 has the right, at any time that is not 
later than five days before the Trustee con¬ 
ducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dis¬ 
missed and the Trust Deed reinstated by 
payment to the Beneficiary of the entire 
amount then due, other than such portion of 
the principal as would not then be due had 
no default occurred, by curing any other 
default that is capable of being cured by 
tendering the performance required under 
the obligation or Trust Deed and by payingall 
costs and expenses actually incurred in 
enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, 
together with the trustee’s and attorney’s 
fees not exceeding the amount provided in 
ORS 86.778. NOTICE REGARDING POTENTIAL 
HAZARDS (This notice is required for notic¬ 
es of sale sent on or after January 1, 2015.) 
Without limiting the trustee’s disclaimer of 
representations or warranties, Oregon law 
requires the trustee to state in this notice 
that some residential property sold at a 
trustee’s sale may have been used in manu¬ 
facturing methamphetamines, the chemical 
components of which are known to be toxic. 
Prospective purchasers of residential proper¬ 
ty should be aware of this potential danger 
before deciding to place a bid for this proper¬ 
ty at the trustee’s sale. YOU MAY REACH THE 
OREGON STATE BAR’S LAWYER REFERRAL 
SERVICE AT 503-684-3763 OR TOLL-FREE IN 
OREGON AT 800-452-7636 OR YOU MAY VISIT 
ITS WEBSITE AT: WWW.OSBAR.ORG. Legal 
assistance may be available if you have a 
low income and meet federal poverty guide¬ 
lines. For more information and a directory 
of legal aid programs, go to http://www.ore- 
gonlawhelp.org. Any questions regardingthis 
matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, 
Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS 

#40453.120). DATED: JUNE 19,2018. Nancy 
K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, 
LLP, P.0. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. 


UNCLAIMED PROPERTY NOTICE is hereby given 
that the City of Eugene Police Department 
has in its physical possession the unclaimed 
money on the below listed cases.06-15709, 
07-04066, 07-08125, 07-12525, 07-15221, 
08-00470, 08-02761, 08-07270, 08-09376, 
08-11163, 08-14176, 08-15768, 09-00586, 
09-03359, 09-09151, 09-10406, 09-13973, 
09-15090, 09-15247, 09-16661, 09-20796, 
09-22084, 10-01845, 10-02092, 10-05905, 
10-06542, 10-07006, 10-13151, 10-13671, 

10- 19927, 11-00146, 11-04709, 11-05369, 

11- 05944, 11-06885, 11-10897, 11-16128, 

11- 19865, 12-02801, 12-03314, 12-06818, 

12- 10243, 12-12901, 12-22281, 12-23060, 

12- 23269,13-00019,13-04147,13-06244, 

13- 06328,13-06639,13-10452,13-12174 

, 13-13638, 13-14562, 13-15147, 

13- 18368,14-00968,14-02550,14-10304, 

14- 13410,14-13646,14-14561,14-15318. 

If you have any ownership or security inter¬ 
est in any of the unclaimed property listed 
in this notice, you must file a claim with the 
City of Eugene Police Department WITHIN 30 
DAYS from the date of publication of this 
notice, or you will lose your interest in that 
property. You may claim property by call¬ 
ing the Evidence Control Unit (ECU) for an 
appointment at 541-682-2814 between the 
hours of 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday 
through Friday, except holidays. You must 
make an appointment and bring supporting 
documentation of your ownership or secu¬ 
rity interest, with valid photo identification 
for the property to be released. 


■3QI5 @EUGENEWEEKLY 



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ARE YOU INTERESTED IN BECOMING 

A CERTIFIED ALCOHOL 
AND DRUG COUNSELOR? 


Serenity Lane is a NAADAC 
approved educational provider 
and has been training addiction 
counselors for over thirty years. 

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information and an application. 


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JONESIN’ CROSSWORD FreeStuff 

BY MATT JONES ©2018 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) " a b'8 freestyle for the 900th Jonesm puzzle. 


ACROSS 

1 URL component 
4 Writer Bombeck 
8 Flat floaters 
13 Longtime Jets OB who 
led the NFL in passer 
rating in 1985 

15 “Ran” director Kuro¬ 
sawa 

16 Put into a different 
envelope 

12 Uncompromising 

18 For each 

19 Slowdowns 
20_-days (heavy practic¬ 
es for football teams) 

21 Letters on NYC subways 

23 Woody Guthrie’s kid 

24 2008 puzzle game for 
the Wii that relied heavily 
on multiplayer modes 

29 Velvet finish 

30 “Jackass” costar who 

P- 


had his own “Viva” spinoff 
on MTV 

31 Droop 

32 “No_way!” (self-cen- 
sorer’s exclamation) 

33 Big figure 

36 Night away from the 
usual work, maybe 

40 Flotshot 

41 “Things will be OK” 

43 Charity calculation 

45 Ex-NFILstarTikkanen 

46 Magazine that sounds 
like a letter 

4 7 Supporting bars 

49 Congenitally attached, 
in biology 

51 Coloraturas’ big 
moments 

52 “Can’t eat another bite” 

55 Norse goddess married 
to Balder 

56 Many seniors, near the 


end? 

5 7 Feline “burning bright” 
in a Blake poem 

58 “Good for what _ ya” 

59 Jekyll creator’s mono¬ 
gram 

DOWN 

1 Flard-to-search Internet 
area “just below the 
surface” in that iceberg 
infographic 

2 The slightest bit 

3 Record player compo¬ 
nent 

4 Perry Mason creator_ 
Stanley Gardner 

5 2016 Olympics city 

6 “Au revoir,_amis” 

? Suffix after hex- or pent- 

8 Seldom seen 

9 AKC working dog 

10 “Yeah, just my luck...” 


8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

15 





17 










■ 

23 




28 

1 

29 




HI 




33 

34 

35 

1 

36 

40 



41 

43 



44 

■ 

47 




48 

51 





55 





57 






37 136 139 


11 One step below the 
Majors 

12 Elegy, perhaps 

13 Surname of brothers 
Chris and Martin, hosts 
of “Zoboomafoo” and a 
self-titled “Wild” PBS Kids 
show 

14 Discreet way to be 
included on an email, for 
short 

19 Where the military goes 

21 Flarvard’s school color 
before crimson 

22 Hesitant 

25 Plant firmly (var.) 

26 Artillery barrages 
2? Spruces up 

28 “Crazy Rich Asians” 
actor Jimmy 0. and come¬ 
dian Jenny, for two 

33 “Don’t Worry, Fie Won’t 
Get Far on Foot” director 

34 Cube origin? 

35 Taking a close look 

37 Precede, as at a concert 

38 Pita filler 

39 Snapchat features 
42 Saxophonist’s supply 
44 Gregg Allman’s brother 

48 Peter I, e.g. 

49 “Flole-in-the-wall” 
establishments? 

50 Really liked 

52 Strong pub option 

53 Test for internal inju¬ 
ries, for short 

54 Fa follower 




EUGENEWEEKLY.COM • SEPTEMBER 6, 20l8 










FREE WILL 


ASTROLOGY 


ROB BREZSNY 


ARIES (March 21-April 19): Now is an excellent time to feel and explore and understand and even appreciate 
your sadness. To get you in the mood, here’s a list of sadnesses from novelist Jonathan Safran Foer: sadness of 
the could-have-been; sadness of being misunderstood; sadness of having too many options; sadness of being 
smart; sadness of awkward conversations; sadness of feeling the need to create beautiful things; sadness 
of going unnoticed; sadness of domesticated birds; sadness of arousal being an unordinary physical state; 
sadness of wanting sadness. 

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Do you have any feral qualities lurking deep down inside you? Have you ever felt 
a mad yearning to communicate using howls and yips instead of words? When you’re alone, do you sometimes 
dispense with your utensils and scoop the food off your plate with your fingers? Have you dreamed of running 
through a damp meadow underthe full moon forthe sheer ecstasy of it? Do you on occasion experience such 
strong erotic urges that you feel like you could weave your body and soul together with the color green or the 
sound of a rain-soaked river orthe moon rising overthe hills? I ask these questions, Taurus, because now is an 
excellent time to draw on the instinctual wisdom of your feral qualities. 

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Close some doors today,” writes novelist Paulo Coelho. “Not because of pride, 
incapacity or arrogance, but simply because they lead you nowhere.” I endorse his advice for your use, Gemini. 
In my astrological opinion, you’ll be wise to practice the rough but fine art of saying no. It’s time for you to make 
crisp decisions about where you belong and where you don’t; about where your future fulfillment is likely to 
thrive and where it won’t; about which relationships deserve your sage intimacy and which tend to push you in 
the direction of mediocrity. 

CANCER[June 21-July 22): To casual observers you may seem to be an amorphous hodgepodge, or a sim¬ 
mering mess of semi-interesting confusion, or an amiable dabbler headed in too many directions at once. But in 
my opinion, casual observers would be wrong in that assessment. What’s closer to the symbolic truth about you 
is an image described by poet Carolyn Forche: grapes that are ripening in the fog. Here’s another image that res¬ 
onates with your current state: sea turtle eggs gestating beneath the sand on a misty ocean beach. One further 
metaphor for you: the bright yellow flowers of the evening primrose plant, which only bloom at night. 

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I want to make sure that the groove you’re in doesn’t devolve into a rut. So I’ll ask you 
unexpected questions to spur your imagination in unpredictable directions. Ready? 1. How would you describe 
the untapped riches in the shadowy part of your personality? 2. Is there a rare object you’d like to own because 
it would foster your feeling that the world has magic and miracles? 3. Imagine the perfect party you’d love to at¬ 
tend and how it might change your life forthe better. 4. What bird most reminds you of yourself? 5. What’s your 
most evocative and inspiring taboo daydream? 6. In your past, were there ever experiences that made you cry 
for joy in ways that felt almost orgasmic? How might you attract or induce a catharsis like that sometime soon? 

VIRGO (Aug 23-Sept. 22): By volume, the Amazon is the largest river in the world. But where does it origi¬ 
nate? Scientists have squabbled about that issue for more than 300 years. Everyone agrees the source is in 
southwestern Peru. But is it the Apurimac River? The Maranon? The Mantaro? There are good arguments in 
favor of each. Let’s use this question as a poetic subtext as we wonder and meditate about the origin of your life 
force, Virgo. As is the case forthe Amazon, your source has long been mysterious. But I suspect that’s going to 
change during the next 14 months. And the clarification process begins soon. 

LIBRA (Sept. 23-0ct. 22): When Warsan Shire was a child, she immigrated to the UK with her Somalian par¬ 
ents. Now she’s a renowned poet who writes vividly about refugees, immigrants and other marginalized people. 
To provide support and inspiration forthe part of you that feels like an exile or fugitive or displaced person, and 
in accordance with current astrological omens, I offer you two quotes by Shire. 1. “I belong deeply to myself.” 

2. “Document the moments you feel most in love with yourself—what you’re wearing, who you’re around, what 
you’re doing. Recreate and repeat.” 

SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov. 21): “Once in a while came a moment when everything seemed to have something 
to say to you.” So says a character in Alice Munro’s short story “Jakarta.” Now I’m using that message as the 
key theme of your horoscope. Why? Because you’re at the peak of your ability to be reached, to be touched, to 
be communicated with. You’re willing to be keenly receptive. You’re strong enough to be deeply influenced. Is it 
because you’re so firmly anchored in your understanding and acceptance of who you are? 

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In 1928, novelist Virginia Woolf wrote a letter to her friend Saxon Sidney 
Turner. “I am reading six books at once, the only way of reading,” she confided, “since one book is only a single 
unaccompanied note, and to get the full sound, one needs ten others at the same time.” My usual inclination is 
to counsel you Sagittariansto focus on one or two important matters rather than on a multitude of semi-im- 
portant matters. But in accordance with current astrological omens, I’m departing from tradition to suggest you 
adopt Woolf’s approach to books as your approach to everything. Your life in the coming weeks should be less 
like an acoustic ballad and more like a symphony for 35 instruments. 

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Not many goats can climb trees, but there are daredevils in Morocco that do. 

They go in quest of the delicious olive-like berries that grow on argan trees. The branches on which they perch 
may be 30 feet off the ground. I’m naming them as your power creature forthe coming weeks. I think you’re 
ready to ascend higher in search of goodies. You have the soulful agility necessary to transcend your previous 
level of accomplishment. 

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): From 49-45 BC, civil war wracked the Roman Republic. Julius Caesar led 
forces representing the common people against armies fighting for the aristocracy’s interests. In 45 BC, Caesar 
brought a contingent of soldiers to Roman territory in North Africa, intent on launching a campaign against the 
enemy. As the general disembarked from his ship, he accidentally slipped and fell. Thinking fast, he exclaimed, 
“Africa, I have tight told of you!” and clasped the ground, thus implying he had lowered himself on purpose in a 
ritual gesture of conquest. In this way, he converted an apparent bad omen into a positive one. And indeed, he 
won the ensuing battle, which was the turning point that led to ultimate victory and the war’s end. That’s good 
role modeling for you right now. 

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Below are sweet words I’ve borrowed from poets I love. I invite you to use them 
to communicate with anyone who is primed to become more lyrically intimate with you. The time is right for you 
to reach out! l.“You look like a sea of gems,” QaharAasi; 2. “I love you with what in me is unfinished,” Robert 
Bly; 3. “Yours is the light by which my spirit’s born,” E. E. Cummings; 4. “Tell me the most exquisite truths you 
know,” Barry Hannah; 5. “It’s very rare to know you, very strange and wonderful,” F. Scott Fitzgerald; 6. “When 
you smile like that you are as beautiful as all my secrets,” Anne Carson; 7. Everything you say is “like a secret 
voice speaking straight out of my own bones,” Sylvia Plath 

HOMEWORK What good old thing could you give up in order to attract a great new thing into your life? 
Testify at Freewillastrology.com. 


GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM 

CHECKOUT EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. 



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I’m a cis woman in my mid-40s, and my significant other has a cuckolding fetish. My first re¬ 
sponse was “Oh, hell no!” But if I’m willing to have a threesome, how much further of a stretch is 
it, really? He does have some experience with this varsity-level kink, so he knows what to expect. 
I’ve asked him some questions, but some things I prefer to research on my own. My questions for 
you: (1) I don’t get cuckolding. I’ve read all about it, but nothing about it resonates with me. My SO 
really wants me to be into his fetish if I am going to act on it, but what if I’m just into being GGG? 
Can’t that be enough? (2J How should I go about finding appropriate candidates who would be 
into sharing this experience with us? I’m not really sure that I’d want someone with experience as 
a bull, because I don’t feel good about this playing out the way I’ve seen it in porn. (3J We enjoy 
cross-dressing and chastity play. How do I find someone who will be cool about my SO sitting in 
the room in a cock lock and lingerie ? [4] I kind of have a “type” (don’t we all], and I’m not certain 
my type plays into this kink. I prefer someone who is very dominant in public but submissive to me 
in the bedroom. This doesn’t seem to align with your typical bull behavior. However, I do not enjoy 
being dominated. Do you think this matters? 


Can’t Understand Cuckold Kink 



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1. Cuckolding isn’t that hard to understand: A cuckold gets off on their partner fucking other people 
and being humiliated or degraded by their partner and/or their partner’s playmates. Seeing as you al¬ 
ready enjoy dominatingguysandthreesomes, CLICK, what’s not to enjoy abouta cuckoldingscenario? 

2. Vanilla PIV intercourse rarely plays out in real life the way it does in porn. So whether you go with 
an experienced bull or find someone who’s unfamiliar with cuckold play but game, you don’t have to 
reenact whatever cuckold porn you’ve watched or read. Write your own script! 

3. By using your words, CUCK. Tell any guy who’s interested in being your very special guest star 
(VSGS) that your SO is a cuckold and he’ll be there in lingerie with his cock locked up. If that turns a 
VSGS candidate off, then he’s not the right VSGS for you. 

4. In most cuckold porn, the bull—the man who fucks the cuck’s wife or girlfriend (or boyfriend or 
husband) in front of him—is the dominant partner. But, again, you get to write your own script, and if 
you want your bull to be submissive, make that clearto your potential bulls. 

I’m a 54-year-old gay guy living in New York City. I’m into bondage, and I have a profile on 
Recon with plenty of pictures showing what I’m into. A guy visiting from San Francisco cruised me. 
He asked me to send a face pic, and I did. He invited me to his hotel. He didn’t have any gear with 
him, so I stopped at a hardware store and picked up $40 worth of rope and duct tape on my way 
to meet him. But after 30 seconds of small talk, he said he just wasn’t feeling it. I said OK, that 
happens, and I left. I’m totally confused. I’m a decent-looking guy, and the photo I sent is recent. 
I was freshly showered, so no hygiene or BO issues. Obviously, you can’t force yourself to be into 
someone, but could he have handled it better? Should he have followed up with a message apolo¬ 
gizing? Should I reach out and ask him what happened, or is that just pathetic? 

Bondage Offer Not Delivered After Getting Evicted 

Typically when this happens—photos exchanged, hookup arranged, mind changed—it’s because 
the photos were out of date or were not representative. Since we aren’t always the best judge of our 
own photos, BONDAGE, you should ask a friend who won’t bullshit you to look at your photos and give 
it to you straight. 

If your no-bullshit friend clears your photos, then reach out to Mr. San Francisco. He hadto makea 
snap decision when you arrived with that bag of rope and duct tape: Did he feel comfortable letting this 
stranger render him helpless? In a vanilla hookup, he could give it a little time and back out after some 
foreplay—it’s a lot harder to back out when the foreplay involves rope and duct tape. So send him a 
message via Recon. Open by telling him you aren’t buttsore or angry, and he had every right to change 
his mind, even atthe last minute—which means he has nothingto apologize for, so you aren’t owed an 
apology and you shouldn’t message him if you’re seeking one. 

Then ask if you said or did something that made him feel unsafe. If you did, BONDAGE, accept his 
feedback graciously—don’t argue with him orattemptto litigate what went down. Just listen. It may not 
have been your intention to freak him out by making, say, a few serial-killer jokes, but his impression is 
what matters, not your intention. And who knows? A sincere effort to get a little constructive feedback 
may leave him feeling better about you and up for playingthe next time he’s in town. 

My wife has a fantasy where she’s blindfolded and restrained on our bed. She hears the front 
door open, followed by footsteps coming up the stairs, and then she’s ravished by... who? She 
won’t know, presumably, until it’s over. My question: In fulfilling this fantasy for her, where ano¬ 
nymity and surprise are part of the appeal, what do I tell her in advance? Do I discuss the entire 
scenario with her, so she knows exactly what’s going to happen, minus the identity of the very 
special guest star (who would be a semi-regular we’ve played with before, but she wouldn’t nec¬ 
essarily know that at first]? That seems to eliminate the surprise element of the fantasy. Is it 
enough to tell her, without mentioning the specific scenario, that I’d like to make one of her fanta¬ 
sies come true, and ask her to trust me ? 

Ethical Thinking In Quite Unusual, Elaborate Tied Tight Enactment 

Presumably? There’s no room for“presumablies” when you’re arrangingto fulfill a varsity-level fan¬ 
tasy. I’m guessing she’d rather not know who’s ravishing her before or duringthe big event, ETIQUETTE, 
and she may not want to know after. But you need to ask her what she wants—no presumptions—be¬ 
fore you start making arrangements. 

She might want to know everything in advance—including the identity of that stranger—or she 
might want you to decide everything. But you need to check in with her first: “Honey, I wantto help you 
realize that fantasy—you’re tied to the bed, a stranger arrives, you’re ravished by said stranger—but 
I need to know how involved you wantto be in the planning. Clear everything with you—where, when, 
who, how—or just make it happen?” 

You may find that she wants to be surprised by who but not by when, ETIQUETTE, or by when but not 
by who—or by who but not by when, how, or where. Or she may want the whole thingto be a surprise. 
But you have to find out exactly what she wants before you make any plans. 

And here’s a bonus pro tip for you: Don’t reveal the identity of your VSGS immediately afterward. 
Because if it goes well, and your wife wants a repeat, you may be able to get a few more encounters 
out of your first VSGS. 

On the Lovecast, Dan chats with comedian Guy Branum about ass surgery: savagelovecast.com. 


MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET • @FAKEDANSAVAGE • THE SAVAGE LOVECAST AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM 


EUGENEWEEKLY.COM • SEPTEMBER 6, 20l8 




















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September 6, 2018 • eugeneweekly.com